November 2014

48 hours. New York Stories | Patrick La Roque

Its 10:15 AM when we land at Laguardia — wait… I shouldn’t start like that. Hic et nunc, here and now; My french lit teacher used to hate this: too obvious, an “expected stratagem” he’d say. Good ‚ole Monsieur Godart… He’d repeat it over and over, sometimes taking a shoe off and banging it on someone’s desk to make his point. Crazy mofo… Good crazy — the kind that makes an impression. Still, it IS 10:15 AM. The last time I was in New York the towers were standing. That’s a whole other reality right there, a whole other reality away from this one. Sometimes life isn’t linear. Sometimes it jumps sideways and we’re left struggling in its wake. There’s a new theory out, something published and serious. According to this article our entire universe could be a holographic projection. Apparently it explains a whole big bunch of discrepancies in our understanding of the laws of physics at the quantum level. I guess Plato was right all along: we’re just the shadows projected by some far away world. Everything we know is a mirage. Makes you think doesn’t it? That science is now slowly proving the chemically induced fantasies of a million teenage kids, or every bad Hollywood ending ever shot — turns out it was allll aaaa dreeeaaammmm… Damn. If this is the reflection, you have to wonder what the hell kind of insane reality is out there…….

Source: www.laroquephoto.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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Sensor Crop Factors and Equivalence | Nasim Mansurov

The subject of sensor crop factors and equivalence has become rather controversial between photographers, sparking heated debates on photography sites and forums. So much has been posted on this topic, that it almost feels redundant to write about it again. Sadly, with all the great and not-so-great information out there on equivalence, many photographers are only left more puzzled and confused. Thanks to so many different formats available today, including 1″/CX, Micro Four Thirds, APS-C, 35mm/Full Frame, Medium Format (in different sizes), photographers are comparing these systems by calculating their equivalent focal lengths, apertures, depth of field, camera to subject distances, hyperfocal distances and other technical jargon, to prove the inferiority or the superiority of one system over another. In this article, I want to bring up some of these points and express my subjective opinion on the matter. Recognizing that this topic is one of the never-ending debates with strong arguments from all sides, I do realize that some of our readers may disagree with my statements and arguments. So if you do disagree with what I say, please provide your opinion in a civilized manner in the comments section below. Before we get started, let’s first go over some of the history of sensor formats to get a better understanding of the past events and to be able to digest the material that will follow more easily……

Source: photographylife.com

Fuji XF60mm f/2.4 R Macro: A Lens Re-visited | Dave Young

With the release of the X-pro1, Fuji released 3 prime lenses for their interchangeable lens system cameras, the 18mm, 35mm and 60mm.

With a 35mm focal equivalent view of 90mm, Fuji’s 60mm lens was the ideal portrait lens, together with having the ability to be useful as a macro lens offering a 2:1 ratio for macro use. It’s ability to shoot sharp is well known with many top Fuji professionals once favouring it as their go to lens, however it’s ability to focus fast in anything other than good light has been questioned and with the release of the razor like 56mm f/1.2, the 60mm is less popular than it once was. Last Christmas, I had an opportunity to try the 60mm for a few days and loved it. OK, so the focussing wasn’t lightning quick, but it was OK and the rendered images made up for it. At the time I’d have bought one there and then given the right incentive. Since then I’ve changed my criteria of shooting and with the XT1, been giving serious consideration to the 56mm. The perfect lens for portraiture work, and super fast with its f/1.2 aperture and its ability to melt away backgrounds. However, a very lightly used 60mm became available at just a third of the cost of a 56mm, and so this seems to work all ways……..

Source: daveyoungfotografia.co.uk
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 60mm F2.4

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Fujifilm TCL-X100 tele-conversion lens | Phil Hall

For me, the Fujifilm X100S is one of the standout cameras of the past few years. I love the relatively compact size, classic styling, handling and the results it produces thanks to the excellent sensor and 35mm equivalent lens. With the TCL-X100 teleconverter, the focal length is increased to 50mm for times when the lens is a bit too wide. As the TCL-X100 screws directly onto the front of the X100S, there are no electronic connections, while the large front element means the combination is a more bulky affair. However, it still balances nicely in the hand, and while focusing behaves in a similar way when shooting normally, in macro mode it struggled to acquire focus at times. Images look very good, with the X100S applying in-camera corrections to control distortion very well. The good news is that if you’re shooting raw, Adobe Camera Raw 8.4 applies these same corrections, so you’re not restricted to JPEG-only corrected files……..

Source: www.amateurphotographer.co.uk
 


Fuji TCL-X100

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Olympus E-M1 vs. Fuji X-T1 – after using both for a longer period
of time | Robin Schimko

Verdict

There are more things that separate those two cameras and my findings just represent the most important ones for me. Either way both of these cameras are very capable and both have their strengths and weaknesses. If you want a lightweight and small kit then the E-M1 might be the way to go. But if you want direct access to the most important controls and you don’t mind a little more weight and a little bulkier lenses, then the X-T1 could be the camera of your choice. The bottom line is that you can’t go wrong with any of these cameras and in the end it’s more about personal preferences. No matter how you gonna decide, enjoy your camera and keep shooting……

Source: www.fotodesign-rs.de
 


Fuji X-T1

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Fujifilm XF 56mm f/1.2 APD, XF 50-140mm f/2.8 and
Zeiss Touit 50mm f/2.8 – A portrait gallery | MirrorLessons

A couple of weeks ago, Heather and I spent the day at a special Touch & Try event organised by the great people at the Riflessi Shop in Turin. There we had the chance to have a second look at the new Fujinon lenses announced at Photokina, which we briefly tried at the event. Due to limited time and the restricted location, this article isn’t an actual review of the lenses but a gallery of images taken in a studio environment combined with a few personal thoughts. While testing these different lenses, I came to the realisation of just how perfectly executed the Fujifilm lens road map is. The company has worked extremely hard to create as many tools as possible, not only for amateurs and enthusiasts but also professional photographers. One of the best ways to do this is to concentrate not only on the cameras but also the lenses. If we count 2015, in three years Fujifilm will have manufactured all the lenses users need for 99% of situations and just as with the X series cameras, the quality of these lenses is extremely high. From the first well chosen trio of focal lengths (a wide angle, standard and macro/portrait lens) to the latest addition, Fuji engineers have never seemed to veer away from the path. Thanks to the latest releases, the options for portrait photographers are now expanding, and with the lenses coming out next year, they will soon have everything they need to work…….

Source: www.bestmirrorlesscamerareviews.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Close Examination of Fuji X-Series Lag Time |
Easycass on Digital Photography Review

Conclusions

From these tests, one can conclude that the lag time, between firing the shutter and capturing the image, is variable according to what camera and lens is being used, the aperture selected, the focal length of the lens, the focus distance and any adjustments in focus. Whilst under test conditions it is possible to somewhat predict might happen at a given aperture, with a given lens, at a certain focal length and focus distance, the huge number of variations and combinations of these parameters made it impossible to come up with a general rule to allow one to predict the lag under normal shooting conditions. It is unclear what is happening to cause this extra delay after a focus adjustment, but the audible noise that can be heard from the lenses give some clue that there is some extra mechanical activity taking place before exposure at the time the lag is greatest. Whether or not this lag variation can be resolved for the affected lenses, in this case the 35mm, 56mm and 60mm, through a firmware update is not clear. The internal design may actually make it necessary to have such variable delays. However, it seems possible that there may in fact be some way to improve the performance, eliminating the extra delay, by not reacting to the focus adjustments, since these adjustments do not seem necessary in the 18mm and 18-55mm lenses…..

Source: www.dpreview.com

That one shot | Othman Kammah

Last week’s travel to Mexico was great. The weather was beautiful, the people were fantastic, and the Fuji X100S by my side — once again — did not disappoint. As a matter of fact it allowed me to get „that one shot“. You know, that shot that you look back at and just can’t seem to get your eyes off of. The one that isn’t necessarily perfectly sharp. The one you keep admiring. The one you are so proud of but can’t explain why. Maybe other people don’t see it that way but you do. During a walk around Playa Del Carmen, I was amazed by the amount of locals just running around the streets. It seemed everyone was rushing to approach the tourists crowd and sell them whatever goods they stocked in their stores. But despite the chaos, the loudness, and the overall feeling of sales pressure; There stood one scene. One peaceful, beautiful moment of happiness and love. I noticed a little girl from across the street. She was sitting on a ledge playing with her two puppies. Blissful at the ability to enjoy that moment with her dogs. I knew I had to capture that moment. I knew it would be that one shot for me…….

Source: www.kammah.ca
 


Fuji X100S

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Street Beats – Toronto with the X-Pro1 and
Some Scary Mean Dude | Peter Evans

Toronto. City of Scott Pilgrim, craft beer, trams, music and skyscrapers. But was it going to be a city prime for street photography? Or one where the hapless Brit with a Fuji camera get the ever-loving crap beaten out of him? In planning my photography expedition to the rust-belt town of Bradford, PA, it seemed odd to me that the cheapest way of getting there wasn’t to fly to Pittsburgh and coach it up but instead to fly over to Toronto in Canada and catch the Greyhound over the border. Once in Buffalo, it was simply a ninety mile road trip south. Not that I was complaining about getting the chance to see Toronto. I’d been a little in awe of it ever since that wonderful film Scott Pilgrim. It’s a big city and getting bigger, and if you go and catch a film set in New York, chances are its actually filmed in Toronto. But I didn’t have long there; a mere few days to hang out with a friend, drink some fine beer and go walking the streets, taking pictures. Unfortunately visiting Toronto didn’t turn out as pleasant as I hoped. Indeed, it was there that photography, for the first time, got me a nasty beating…

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Storyteller Series: The secret side of childhood | Patrick St-Hilaire

As a portrait photographer, I am always inspired by other photographers that have the ability to capture a portrait that is so compelling and thought provoking.  It is a rare gift to capture the essence of a person within a photograph, really touching the hearts of those that view the portrait. I would like to introduce to you, a photographer that does this very thing, his images are so beautiful and raw. Harsh in presence, yet emotional while inviting you into a very personal space. I have always loved his work, so it is my honour to share with you all, Patrick St-Hilaire…..

Source: grryo.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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