März 2015

The Death of Kaizen? A Change in Fujifilm’s Update Strategy |
Henry Smiths

It’s hard to remember now, but was actually back in September of 2010, that Fujifilm, abandoned the hybrid Fujifilm imager/Nikon Body template that it had been following since the early 2000’s, and introduced a new and intriguing digital camera that hearkened back to rangefinder cameras of the past.  This camera, known as the X 100, was introduced as a premium product for the discerning photographer. It was a beautiful camera, and its design evoked an emotional response from older photographers, who could recall an earlier age when camera settings were set by turning dials, and aperture rings.   It featured, a fast , sharp fixed focus lens, and an excellent imager.   It had the effect of reducing photography,which had been increasingly complicated by burgeoning technology, back to its essence. But it was a deeply flawed product at its introduction……..

Source: henrysmithscottage.com
 


Fujifilm X100s

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Top 5 Ways For Improving Food Photography Composition |
We Eat Together

Hey everyone we’re giving away a free 3 part Guide To Better Composition here http://bit.ly/Nx6LGW that will spice up your food photos. Hosted by Skyler Burt from http://weeattogether.com In this tutorial, Skyler walks you through the basics of improving food photography composition. He takes you through the different camera angles and some styling techniques that will get you making those jaw-dropping, mouth-watering images……..

Source: www.youtube.com

Aurora, Fuji, Sony and Fish-Eye | Mac Sokulski

Aurora, Northern Lights, what ever you like to call it, is quite a beautiful sight, if you manage to catch it.  Not only our Sun should be having an angry fit, spouting radiation into space in a fit of rage, but the sky, here on earth, should be preferably cloudless.  It is also hard to predict.  If you want to photograph this phenomenon it’s best to go out early enough, find a pleasing location before it gets fully dark.  Bring a sandwich, hot tea, and settle down for the wait.  Or you can be like us. See it, grab the cameras, and hope for the best.  Trust me, our way is not a very good way, since you will miss most of the light show. Photographing the Aurora, is relatively easy.  Tripod, wide angle lens, possibly a remote shutter cord, and patience.  I use a manual fish-eye lens on my Fuji X-T1.  I set it to infinity focus, wide open, and set the camera to bulb mode.  Then press the trigger and time my shots.  Depending on the brightness of the event the exposures are 15-20 sec. Kasia uses her Sony NEX camera in the same fashion. The most important thing you can do to capture compelling images of the Northern Lights is planning.  If you are like us, and run out the door with half the things forgotten, you might be in for a frustrating evening, with the dancing light in the sky mocking you…….

Source: www.miksmedia.photography
 


Fuji X-T1

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Understanding the Difference Between Photoshop and Lightroom |
Digital-Photography-School

One of the most common questions I hear from people just starting out in photography is, “What program should I use to edit my photos?”. There are many free options such as iPhoto, Picasa, GIMP, and other commercial programs such as AfterShot Pro and Pixelmator but the most popular programs are Photoshop and Lightroom. That question is usually followed by another, which seems quite logical, “What’s the difference between Photoshop and Lightroom?”. While the two programs do share many similarities, and are both widely used by the photographic community, they each serve a unique purpose and are quite different in some very major ways. Understanding what makes them similar, as well as different, can help you make an informed choice when selecting the right software for your needs……
 
Source: digital-photography-school.com

Fujifilm X-E2 REVIEW | Skyler Burt

We purchased a Fujifilm X-E2 recently, mainly because we liked the Fujifilm X-E1 so much, that we wanted to have two of these badass cameras for when we travel or shoot food. The two cameras are so very similar, you can’t really tell them apart whether by looks or specs. So I find it a little difficult to say anything more than my previous review of the Fujifilm X-E1. Originally, I thought of doing a comparison like when I pitted the Fujifilm X-E1 against Canon’s 5DMKII and 7D. I wanted to try to beat that very unscientific post, by doing and even more unscientific post. I wanted to compare the Fujifilm X-E2 with a completely ridiculous contender the Mamiya 645 AFDII with a ZD Digital Back. Alas, I’m having some CF card issues with the Mamiya (as it’s 10 years old) so that idea was tossed. So what am I going to talk about now, you ask? Well, since Fujifilm has put out a new camera that is basically the same as it’s predecessor, I’ll have to expound on more of the same, which is surprisingly good……….

Source: weeattogether.com
 


Fujifilm XE-2

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A year with the Fuji X-T1 | Mike Croshaw

I hadn’t realised until a few days ago that I’ve now had the Fuji X-T1 for a year, and its been just over a year that I’ve been shooting almost totally with a mirrorless system….. Since that shoot I’ve completed around 50 model shoots, 5 weddings, a few football matches, family events too numerous to mention, around 10 lighting workshops and one trip to London shooting street photography and buildings.  Basically, I’ve shot every week of the past year and loved almost every minute. The most challenging environment for this camera was without doubt the weddings.  I’m still not confident of my ability to capture the down the aisle shots or the dancing.  That being said, I’ve managed ok, but I’m sure I could do better.  I see photographers like Andrew Billington and Kevin Mullins shoot those moments all the time, but they have their workarounds and they shoot this stuff every week, I don’t. Here are some of the wedding shots from the past year……..
 
Source: www.mikecroshaw.com
 


Fujifilm XT-1

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Fujifilm Q&A @ CP+ 2015: What next for X-mount | Imaging Resouce

But [for example], while we have provided firmware upgrades for the X100S many times, now we have the X100T, we’re finished, no firmware upgrades [for the X100S] anymore. Makoto Oishi

Continuing my series of executive interviews from the recent CP+ 2015 show in Yokohama Japan, I met with Mr. Makoto Oishi from the Sales & Marketing Division, Optical Device & Electronic Imaging Products Division at Fujifilm Corp. Topics for discussion included the company’s X-mount mirrorless camera plans, first and third-party glass for X-mount cameras, and Fuji’s unusually generous firmware update philosophy. Perhaps most interesting to me, though, was an insight into how Fuji sees 4K video capture and its place in the market — doubly so when Oishi-san turned the tables and I briefly became the interviewee, sharing my own thoughts on the adoption of ultra high-def video.

(As always, we’ve done some editing to the dialog to remove conversational glitches and make the text scan better. Places where we’ve inserted a word or changed the phrasing for better readability are enclosed in square braces and italicized. So, too, are comments of my own, reading between the lines of the discussion.) ……

Source: www.imaging-resource.com
 


Fuji X100S

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Welding Glass | Mark L. Simpson

Although I’m a huge fan of Lee Filters’ 10 stop neutral density filter, the ‘Big Stopper’, there are occasions when 10 stops simply isn’t enough. Formatt-Hitech now market 13 and 16 stop versions of their Firecrest ND filters but I thought I would seek a more economical solution before spending another £100 on a brittle glass filter. So I purchased a piece of 4 1/4″ x 3 1/4″ (107 x 82mm) shade 10 welding glass on eBay for the princely sum of 99p delivered (!) and mounted this to an old 77mm filter ring using double sided padded car number plate tape to make it light tight. The welding glass is a tad rough around the edges so it is best to be careful when handling it and also not to go too near anyone when it is mounted on the lens and camera. Obviously there are no UV or Infra Red filters on the welding glass and it also gives a very strong green colour cast but this is easily sorted with a custom white balance or in Lightroom with a Temp of 5000 and a Tint of +150 (max magenta). Dull cloudy days are best as any direct sun creates very strange patterns on the image, straight edges also give very strong purple fringing or chromatic aberration but this is no problem if the image is converted to black and white………

Source: www.electriclemonade.co.uk
 


Fuji X-T1

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A visit to Minninglow | Nick Lukey

Last week I pulled the trigger on a new lens, one that I swore i wasn’t going to purchase. The Fuji 10-24mm arrived a few days ago, but due to other commitment,s and the weather I had not had a chance to shoot outdoors with it much. This lens will replace the legendary 14mm, one lens I thought i would never change. So what was it like out in the field?  Quite simply it’s outstanding. So with the promise of some spring sunshine, I took off from the gallery a little early and headed of to Minninglow near Parwich. It’s been a year since I last visited the place, and I am always happy to be back for a wander round the Bronze age site. It’s a great place to spend an hour or two, very easy access from the Tissington trail. So how does the 10-24mm compare to my much loved 14mm. Well I can say without a doubt that it seems to me to be pretty equal, maybe the 14mm edges it in micro contrast just. The 14mm has the aperture ring, and it’s a shame that its not present on the ultra wide. However the differences in extra viewing real estate is the real issue for me…….

Source: www.thebigpicturegallery.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF10-24mm F4.0

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Das Carl Zeiss Distagon 35mm f1.4 ZM | Mehrdad Samak-Abedi

Auf der Photokina 2014 kündigte die Carl Zeiss AG das Distagon 35mm f1.4 ZM für das Leica Bajonett an. Bei einem Straßenpreis von knapp 2000 Euro kann man es nicht unbedingt als Schnäppchen bezeichnen, jedoch ist es recht offensichtlich, welchen Kundenkreis Carl Zeiss mit diesem Objektiv ansprechen will. Vergleicht man das Distagon mit seinem Leica Pendant, das Summilux 35mm (ca. 4500 Euro), sieht das mit dem Schnäppchen schon ganz anders aus. Wie immer ist das eine Frage des Standpunktes. Ich gehöre zur ersten Gruppe, also zu der, die das nicht als ein Schnäppchen sehen und eher mit Objektiven vergleichen, die preislich weiter unten angesiedelt sind. Aktuell fällt mir da im Moment nur das Voigtländer  35mm f1.2 Nokton II oder das sehr charaktervolle Voigtländer 35mm f1.4 Nokton ein. Das Nokton II habe ich von einem Fotofreund derzeit geliehen bekommen, aber bitte erwartet hier keine Vergleiche, ich komme derzeit nicht so zum Ausprobieren des selben. Hier soll es aber eh nur um das Distagon gehen. Und bevor ich das vergesse zu erwähnen: Ich bin kein Technikfreak, will sagen: Das ist hier ist ein Nutzer-Erfahrungsbericht. Ich verliere mich hier weniger in technischen Details (ganz einfach, weil ich davon auch viel zu wenig Ahnung habe, aber psssst!!) als mehr in aus dem Fotoalltag gewonnenen Erkenntnissen…….

Source: www.qimago.de
 


Fuji X-Pro1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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