Juni 2015

Cheap Samyang 12mm any good for Fuji X? | Lars Øivind Authen

I didn’t see this one coming, that a cheap Samyang 12mm lens at third of the price of the more known Zeis Touit 12mm for Fuji, would perform this good. For a long time the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 has been one of my favorite lenses for my X-T1. Even though I’m not a pixel peeper, I found it pretty sharp. It’s easy to manual focus thanks to the focusing scale on the lens itself, and it’s small and lightweight. Most importantly, it fits my eye, my vision, when I compose my landscape shots. Sometimes I’ve been thinking that maybe just having the 14mm is too limiting. I have longed for something a bit wider, like the Zeiss Touit 12mm f/2.8 – or just buy the Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 wide angle zoom. But, I like shooting primes. I like having the aperture settings marked on the lens. It’s easier for me to learn this way. And the XF 10-24 mm doesn’t have the aperture numbers on the lens.  And, most importantly – trying to learn how to „see“ –  having a zoom isn’t helping me that much. I could be wrong. Probably I am wrong – but it’s still an idea in my head that shooting primes is more fun. I had the very good Fujinon XF 18-55 mm f/2.8-4.0 for a while, but sold it. I never got used to the zooming. BUT – the Zeiss Touit 12mm f/2.8 is very expensive. And it doesn’t even have the aperture stops printed on the lens – and there’s no scale for manual focusing scale on the lens like on the Fujinon XF 14mm. Most important is the price though……..

Source: www.larsauthen.com
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

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Zoom Lenses Vs. Prime Lenses | Sebastian Boatca

Many people asked me one of the oldest questions in Modern Era Photography : is it better to shoot with primes or with zooms? Here are my thoughts about this topic and I remember I have asked this question myself many times. I had strong debates with friends and this topic invited me to search the web, looking for a clear answer. I needed the expertise of professionals, to see what are the pros and cons when working on site with different type of lenses. After I have slowly built my limited experience as a photographer (especially Landscape and Travel), I have felt on my own skin the pros and cons of using both prime and zoom lenses. Of course I have started with a kit lens, my first zoom being EF-S 17-85mm IS USM on a Canon 60D and my first prime was the famous EF 50mm F1.8 II plastic-fantastic lens. As a beginner, I loved the Canon EF zoom more, but the IQ from the nifty-fifty was way better……

Source: www.sebastianboatca.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF10-24mm F4.0

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Understanding AF and MF: focusing aids tested | Ming Thein

Right after the question of ‘what X should I buy?’ comes ‘how do you manually focus your lenses?’ in popularity. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to dismiss everything under the sufficiency banner; contrary to the trends in image quality, we’ve gone the opposite direction away from sufficiency. There used to be a time when viewfinders were actually very good for acquiring focus manually; there was no choice because there was simply no other way to focus, either. That required a few things: firstly, a focusing screen with adequate coarseness (sometimes also referred to as ‘snap’); the same distance between flange and focusing screen and flange and imaging plane; adequate magnification, and fast lenses – to compensate for the coarseness of the focusing screen making it somewhat dark. Looking through the viewfinder of an F2 or a Hasselblad is a revelation compared to the drinking straws of modern finders. It seems we barely have the latter these days. So what can we do? ……

Source: blog.mingthein.com
 


Fuji X-T1 Graphite Silver

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The X100T, my personal review | Stockografie

New is an all-electronic shutter, which reaches up to 1/32000s shutter speed. The downside is that the flash does not work with the electronic shutter. What a shame. The four-way controller is new, which I talked about already, and new is that you can assign the four way controller either as four FN buttons, or you can set it to move the focus point without having to hit the button twice. I personally us them as four FN buttons as I do tend to change the settings regularly. I have also assigned the other FN buttons to my taste. The Wi-Fi is used to toggle between face detection on/off, the trash can button is used to switch on/off the in-built ND Filter and the top FN button next to the exposure compensation dial is used for the metering mode. Fujifilm gave us 3 custom profiles for the Auto-ISO setting. This can be great but it can also be a little bit confusing. I personally tend to stick with Auto-ISO 200-6400 with the minimum shutter speed set to 1/60s. In some cases I will set the ISO manually to the value that I need. On the above picture you can see which FN button I have assigned to ISO. Another new feature which many of us Fuji X users have been waiting for is a customizable Q menu. At first I was not in to it at all. I don’t need it; Fuji did a great job on the Q menu anyway…….
 
Source: stockografie.de
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji X-T1 vs Sony A7r – A Pixel-To-Pixel Showdown | Alik Griffin

Since early 2013 with the introduction of the X100s, the Fuji X-Trans CMOS II APS-C has been Fujifilm’s flagship sensor that they’ve been using in all their APS-C cameras. While winning much praise from Fuji fans, the sensor also holds a lot of mystery and even retains some criticism. The performance specs of the sensor after all remain relatively unknown. The last time DXOMark touched a Fujifilm camera was back 2013, completely ignoring this new sensor and we’ve been left in the dark on how it rates against the competition in terms of dynamic range, sharpness, high ISO and color accuracy. As we all know, or should I say, according to DXOMark, Sony makes what are considered to be the best sensors out there. With the Sony A7r (and soon to be A7rII) being their best camera in terms of sensor performance with still photography, the cameras also has this special capability of being placed in a 16 megapixel APS-C crop mode. This makes it the perfect camera to put up against the Fuji X-T1 at a pixel-to-pixel comparison. Meaning, I’m not going to compare the Full Frame vs. APS-C qualities of the camera, instead I’m comparing the real estate of the sensor itself. With the Sony A7r placed in APS-C crop mode it becomes nearly identical to the Fuji X-T1. Both cameras will be at 16 megapixels, both having a 1.5x APS-C crop factor. Both sensors are even manufactured by Sony, but both cameras seem to produce two very different RAW files……

Source: alikgriffin.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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14mm f/2.8 vs. 16mm f/1.4 vs. 18mm f/2 | Fuji vs. Fuji

It’s been relatively easy to decide between Fuji’s wide angle prime offerings up until recently. One could either go for the really wide, full(er)-featured, king of landscapes, the XF 14mm f/2.8, or the smaller, faster, lighter, more portrait and street-focused XF 18mm f/2. There was enough of a variance in focal length to make choosing simple, or owning both perfectly viable. Fuji has thrown a large wrench into our purchase decision with the release of the XF 16mm f/1.4. It packs all the features of the 14mm f/2.8 and adds weather sealing, a Nano GI coating, offers even faster aperture performance than the 18mm f/2, but comes with a significant enough size and weight penalty. This article will hopefully help you decide which wide angle primes are right for you, if any…..

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16mm F1.4

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Fujifilm XF 16mm F1.4 R WR Review | PhotographyBLOG

The Fujifilm XF 16mm F1.4 R WR is a fast wide-angle prime lens in Fujifilm’s XF line-up. The weather-proof 16mm F1.4 lens boasts an angle-of-view similar to that of a 24mm lens in a 35mm system, making it suitable for street photography, landscapes and reportage. Other highlights include an iris diaphragm with nine rounded blades, an optical formula that comprises 13 lens elements in 11 groups, including two ED and two aspherical elements, a built-in high-torque DC coreless motor which delivers ultra-fast AF performance, HT-EBC and Nano GI coatings to reduce reflections, a camera-to-subject distance indicator and a depth-of-field scale on the lens barrel, a minimum working distance of 15cm, and aperture and focusing rings. The Fujifilm XF 16mm F1.4 R WR lens is available in black for £729.99 / $999.95 in the UK and the US, respectively. A premium-quality metal lens hood (LH-X16, optional) will be released in September……

Source: www.photographyblog.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16mm F1.4

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Fujifilm X100T | Dylan Seeger

Last summer, I became pretty obsessed with cameras. After hearing countless good things from respected camera geeks about recent Sony releases, I took a trip to the Sony store at a nearby mall to play with the A7R and, more importantly, the RX1. And by ‚a trip‘, I of course mean twenty trips. I was never impressed. Every time I used the Sony cameras, I struggled. Autofocus wouldn’t focus. Switching between modes was complicated. Shooting in manual made the camera feel like it was designed by a software engineer. I always assumed that it wasn’t the camera’s fault that I struggled with it, and that it all came down to my own suckiness. After all, I had never really spent much time with cameras that weren’t iPhones. So I think it’s still safe to say that my struggles with the Sony hardware were at the very least partially my fault. Either way, I decided not to buy…….

Source: dylanseeger.com

Part1: http://dylanseeger.com/blog/2015/6/fuji-01
Part2: http://dylanseeger.com/blog/2015/6/fuji-02
Part3: http://dylanseeger.com/blog/2015/6/fuji-03
 


Fuji X100T

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Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) review | Digital Camera World

A digital camera that shoots only in black and white might seem mad, but Leica has embraced the idea and introduced an updated version of its Monochrom rangefinder. The most obvious upgrade is the move from an 18-million-pixel CCD sensor to a 24-megapixel CMOS unit. Not only does this improve resolution, but the use of CMOS technology means the Monochrom (Typ 246) gets live view display and the ability to shoot 1080p Full HD video. The new 3-inch 921,600-dot LCD monitor is also a great improvement over the previous 2.5-inch 230k-dot screen and is protected by a sheet of super-hard, scratch-resistant sapphire glass. There’s also a faster processor that can push DNG raw files and JPEGs to the memory card a lot quicker than before, as well as being able to display captured images with less delay. As the camera shoots only in black and white, the Monochrom has no need for the coloured filters that usually cover pixels on digital sensors. Without these filters more light reaches the photodiodes, hence the base sensor sensitivity has been upped to ISO 320, with the range extending to ISO 25,000. As with most other modern Leica M cameras, you can choose between manual exposure or aperture priority, but focussing is an entirely manual affair……

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.digitalcameraworld.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

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Q – continuum | Mehrdad Samak-Abedi

No, this is not something just for you Trekkies. This is a little review of a camera. Read on. „It’s up to YQU“ – now that’s the new slogan for the English speaking market to advertise the latest offering of Leica – the Q. It has been in my hands for a few days and I have mixed thoughts about Typ 116 as it is called in Leica terms. There are brands that polarize people whenever they release a new product. One of them – in photo business – is Leica. Usually there are two major kinds of response, the lovers will buy their new „baby“ without questions, the haters will look for things not to like about the new product just to rip it apart in discussions. Unfortunately in the past Leica produced some simple point’n’shoot cameras for a much higher price than comparable cameras by other manufacturers. Also in the M-series over time there weren’t too many positive changes. Things like these led to a lot of criticism. Don’t get me wrong, I really like the M-series, but in it’s substance the system is 60-70 years old. My thoughts about the M (Typ 240) you can read here. (in german only, but there is a google translate button). When I learned about a new camera by Leica, I wasn’t really interested. Point’n’shoot is not my territory and that there is now one more button on the M-bodies is of minor interest to me……

Source: www.qimago.de
 


Leica Q

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