Aspects of Digital Photography

Differences between eye and camera: practical implications | Ming Thein

Many photographs do not work. Subsequently, we find out they do not work because there is a difference between what you saw and what your audience sees in the image. Sometimes this comes down to lack of skill in translating an idea, but often it’s more subtle than that: the camera doesn’t see what we see, and we need to be both highly aware of that and how to compensate for it. Yesterday’s photoessay is a good example: it’s no big deal to make a monochrome image, but our eyes only perceive a lack of color under very exceptional circumstances. Yet it’s these differences that make some images stand out, and others not really ‘work’. There are a few important properties of the eye/brain combination to note: firstly, we have an incredibly wide dynamic range, but it isn’t linear. Highlights seldom clip to white or oversaturate, though blacks go black fairly quickly. Also, our vision switches to luminance-sensitive rods at lower brightness levels, meaning that the darker it gets, the more desaturated and flat things appear. A camera mostly maintains linear tonal response across the entire tonal range, and thus the final output will look different to both what we see and our idea of how a scene of that given brightness should look…….

Source: blog.mingthein.com
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

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Nature Photography and the Law | Simon Booth

How do we stand legally when it comes to photographing the flora and fauna that we find in the British countryside? Simon Booth gives us a whistle stop tour of nature photography and the law. For the most part, we needn’t concern ourselves with trespassing whilst out with our cameras enjoying what Britain has to offer, but just occasionally, nature photography and the law run very closely side by side. On these occasions, it’s important to know where you stand, quite literally, when photographing some of our most exciting species. The water vole, kingfisher, badger, otter and barn owl are all high on the nature photographer’s list of things to photograph, and are frequently splashed across the pages of magazines as a result. But how often do we actually consider that all these animals receive some degree of legal protection that as photographers, we should be mindful of? It’s easy to get bogged down in legislation and as part of my job as an ecologist and professional photographer, I know just how much of a minefield it can be. Fortunately though, we only need to learn the basics as photographers…….

Source: www.photographymonthly.com
 


Fujifilm X-T10

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My Philosophy | Luminous Landscape

This essay is the first in a series of essays focused on my work.  I thought it best to start the series with a description of my philosophy in regards to art and photography.  The following essays will focus on explaining specific aspects of my work, namely how I approach and use color, form, composition, light and so on.  Each of these essays will describe the aspects of art and landscape photography that are essential to my work and therefore particularly important to me. I like great gear but I am aware that improving gear means getting better gear, not creating better art. Quite simply better gear equals better resolution, sharpness, dynamic range, stability, functions and other technical qualities.  Better gear does not equal better art or more interesting photographs.  Better knowledge of art and photography equals better art and more interesting photographs…….

Source: luminous-landscape.com
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

How to Make Your Photos More Interesting with a Human Element |
Andrew S. Gibson

I believe that when someone asks how to improve their composition, that what they’re really asking is how they can make their photos more interesting. The skill of composition is in arranging the elements of the scene in such a way that the resulting image is aesthetically pleasing, and interesting to look at. Composition involves using techniques such as including leading lines, isolating the subject, exploiting tonal contrast, deciding what to leave out of the frame, and so on. But none of this matters much if your subject matter is boring. The most effective way to create interesting images is to find an interesting subject. Composition becomes much easier when your subject is interesting. You are more likely to be enthusiastic about the photos, and put more effort into finding a good composition, if you are engaged with, or passionate about the subject. Luckily, there are lots of interesting things to take photos of. But for me the most interesting subject of all is people……..

Source: digital-photography-school.com
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Why Shoot Film? | Leicaphilia

Why shoot film? In a digital world of instant information and communication, there is something very appealing about a medium that requires one to slow down, focus and delay, (thus enhancing) gratification.  There is nothing like shooting a roll of film, then, whether processing yourself, or waiting to receive your results from a lab, viewing the results of what was so carefully crafted. Professional photographers know and love the image quality of film.  Many professional artists will tell you that there is a quality to film that isn’t easy to, or even impossible to replicate digitally. In a fast paced digital world, there is definitely a need for digital photography within the professional realm, but there will always remain a cherished place, and desire for film as well.  There is a growing embracement of film among creative youths, who are discovering its magic for the first time. With the increasing accessibility of high quality cameras and lenses at affordable prices, it’s easy for anyone to get started with film. This has opened up a thrilling resurgence of creativity and ingenuity within the world of photography…….

Source: leicaphilia.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

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Thoughts on portraiture: a morning with Bridget (and the Fuji X100s) |
James Conley

I get depressed every time I see a headshot. Our sense of the “portrait” has been degraded to the most superficial and meaningless, and the headshot has now been consecrated as the most important popular image: the “selfie.” This is bad enough. But when photographers succumb to this popular misconception as a standard, it’s easy to lose hope. Like most things, a large part of the problem is the language. When a photographer is asked to make a “portrait” the photographer of course relies upon the common definition, which is informed by the popular language. This is the start of the problem, but photographers often make it worse with their conception of their “subject.” Photographers commonly talk about the “subject” of a portrait, just as we would talk about the “subject” of a product illustration. By commoditizing the object of our attention, we also limit the ways in which we think about it……..

Source: effeleven.blogspot.de
 


Fuji X100S

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A Brief Review of Formatt Hitech Filters for Mirrorless | Jason Row

My recent move to a mirrorless system using Fuji X series cameras has been a smooth and enjoyable transition. One of the items of kit I had decided to get for the new system was a square filter system. The king of the squares is, of course Lee and they have recently introduced their new mirrorless filter system, Seven5. As befits the quality of Lee, the Seven5 is an expensive piece of kit so I went looking to see if there were any cheaper alternatives. The obvious candidate was the Cokin A series, recently rebadged for mirrorless but in my experience, the quality of their filters tends to be poor and they acrylic seems to scratch very easily. I did, however with a little more research come across a small British company producing good quality square filter systems. Like Lee, Formatt HiTech have a background in cinema lighting filters and have used their knowledge to apply it to photographic filters. They have also recently created a small square filter system for mirrorless based on their 67mm filters……..

Source: www.lightstalking.com
 


Formatt Hitech Filter

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Lightroom CC & the Ghosts of Aperture | Patrick La Roque

So Lightroom CC is out. Yes, CC not 6; although there is or will be a 6. Which will be the same… I think. Frankly, it’s confusing as hell and I’m pretty sure it’s Adobe’s way of slowly getting folks psychologically ready for the inevitable total cloud switch. But, having hopped on board the Photography Plan last year I guess I can’t really bitch about it anymore. And unless the prices change, I still believe the arguments that made me decide to subscribe still hold true. I’ll be honest with you, I’m ambivalent about this release. Not because there aren’t nice additions and fixes but because I can’t help but find it lacking in imagination, given Adobe’s immense ressources. And because even at version 6, the reality is that it still trails behind the now defunct Aperture in way too many departments, even as it adds “new” Aperture inspired features. So while I started writing this post as a short overview of what was new in CC, it devolved into a re-examination of the application as a whole—something I haven’t done publicly in a long time……

Source: www.laroquephoto.com
 


Lightroom CC

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

How to Fix Light Leaks in Long Exposure Photography | Kevin Choi

If you have experimented with long exposure photography, you may have seen light leakage issues in your images. For the uninitiated – your camera is a light tight body that is intended to allow light from one end only, and that’s the front of the lens. Light only enters when you press the shutter release. Normally, your camera wouldn’t allow light to enter through any other opening in the camera. However, unless you have a badly manufactured camera, there is typically only one source that could potentially harm your images, and that’s your camera’s viewfinder. Let’s talk about what you can do to mitigate light leaks during those long exposures…..

Source: photographylife.com

Black and White photography post processing techniques in the
digital age | Joel Tjintjelaar

People familiar with my black and white post processing workflow may conclude that the technique I utilise for black and white post processing isn’t that advanced and are merely tricks to obtain a visual effect. It’s just partly true, yes, the techniques aren’t very advanced at all but no, they’re not just tricks to obtain a specific visual effect. The method I developed for myself, called iterative selective gradient masking 2.0 (iSGM2.0) and use in practice, originate from the fundamental notion that I can’t and won’t let myself be restricted in my artistic expressions by what is seemingly possible with the tools everyone knows for black and white photography post processing: Photoshop, Lightroom and plug-ins like Silver Efex Pro 2 and Topaz to name just a few……..

Source: www.bwvision.com

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