Aspects of Digital Photography

Light, Form, Function – Breaking Symmetry | Sven Schroeter

Ever since Silo park opened to the public and was transformed into a recreation area, it has become an increasingly popular photographic subject. The tall standing towers, with stairs spiralling to the top, are perfect for symmetric, abstract, fine art images. The key when chasing symmetric patterns is discovering the element which breaks the symmetry, regaining balance and automatically providing the focal point for your eye to gravitate to. Consider the first image, the stairs are balanced with the black cut out on the bottom right. Without these two elements, and just the pipe guiding your eye to the top of the tower, there is very little interest. The tower as a whole is symmetric, including the placement of the pipe running up the middle. But the inclusion of the stairs and the tower cutout break the symmetry and encourage your eye to wander throughout……

Source: www.bokeh-monster.com

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What is a macro lens? Magnification and minimum focus
distance explained | Digital Camera World

Our photography cheat sheet answers the question ‘What is a macro lens?’, explaining the different magnifications and minimum focus distance….

Source: www.digitalcameraworld.com

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Transformational Imagemaking: An Interview with Robert Hirsch |
Photo.net

….my position has been that all photographs are constructions. The “window on the world” point of view is based on where the photographer is standing, the time of day, the quality of light, what equipment and processes are utilized, what is included and excluded in the frame, and so on. What determines the photographic outcome we see in magazines, museums, galleries, and in all forms of media are largely determined by this realistic perception mindset. I’m interested in haptic imagemakers who are expressionistically interpreting their subject matter. In place of an outward linear narrative, these artists often rely on an inner psychological approach to their storytelling. This encourages their unconscious to come to the fore and reveal multiple pathways for viewers to explore both the subject matter and the maker. Regardless of their approach, these artists delight in the act of picturemaking……

Source: photo.net

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Using an external lightmeter for accurate, failproof metering |
Thorsten Overgaard

The advantage of using an external light meter is that you deal with an absolute reading of what light there is, not what the reflection is from some default background. Important: If you look at the white bubble on the lightmeter you can see that it is held in an angle so the light and shadow on each side equals the light on the face (the window highlight to the left and the shadows from the room to the right). It is an artistic decision where to hold the light meter, because if you tilt it a bit to the left in this picture it will pick up more light from the window and give a slightly darker exposure. If there is strong light coming in from the window that would be an idea as you then make sure the bright side of the face is correctly exposed, whereas the shadow side of course till be darker (as the whole exposure gets darker)………
 
Source: overgaard.dk

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4 x 3, 3 x 2, 16 x 9, 1 x 1… What’s the Ideal Image Aspect Ratio? |
Theme

There is no ideal image aspect ratio. Depending on the situation, each and every crop ratio has its own pros and cons. Personally I prefer the more landscapy 3 x 2 format, digital imaging’s equivalent to film’s classic 35mm proportions. To some it seems unnatural. Also, the more squarish 4 x 3 offers better corner performance. With all the aspect choices digital cameras offer, which one to go for? If you’re one of the few human beings left who prints photos, most labs will print uncropped if you ask them to. If you don’t specify they will usually fill the paper size or chop off the borders, notwithstanding the possibility that a group portrait of your Micro Four Thirds camera just lost auntie Ann and uncle Joe. Aspect ratios matter………

Source: www.the.me

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Why Sharpness is Overrated in Street Photography | Eric Kim

Sharpness is over-rated in street photography. Even Henri Cartier-Bresson once said, “Sharpness is a bourgeois concept.” I remember when I first saw one of HCB’s exhibitions in person in Paris, I was surprised by how soft most of his shots were. And many of his photos were significantly out of focus (thinking about the famous shot of the man in a bullfighter’s ring in Spain (above). When I stated street photography, I was obsessed with sharpness. This of course, was due to all the nerds on gear forums who showed corner to corner sharpness tests on brick walls. I was suckered into thinking a sharp photo was a good photo. However once I discovered the work or Daido Moriyama, I realized that a good photo didn’t need to be sharp. In-fact, a grainy, out of focus, and soft photo often had more mood, emotion, and soul than an uber-sharp photo…….

Source: erickimphotography.com

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The ART of BOKEH | Sven Schroeter

Not only is Bokeh beautiful, but it also happens to be a key story telling element. Once understood, it will open your eyes to new opportunities and improve your work by adding additional punch, wowing your audience. Our band name ‘Bokeh Monster’ came from the frequent use of the technique; shallow depth of field is one of the many ingredients to our unique style. By removing the distracting elements from a background through the use of shallow depth of field techniques, everyone we photograph can be compared on a even playing field. Context and placement are subtracted from the distraction equation, isolating and honing in on a subject’s beauty for honest appreciation…….

Source: www.bokeh-monster.com

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The Most Informative Tripod, Monopod and Tripod Head
Buying Guide | Leigh Diprose

Are you finding your landscape, wedding, sports or wildlife photos are a bit blurry? If that’s the case you may need to rethink the way you shoot. Have you ever considered photographing with a tripod or monopod before? If not then you’re missing out on producing the sharpest images you could ever possibly imagine. You see without a tripod or monopod to steady your camera, there’s bound to be camera shake, especially in low light situations. As a landscape, wedding, wildlife and portrait photographer myself I find a good quality tripod and monopod are an essential piece of my kit. The first reason I stated earlier, but secondly you should consider using a tripod or monopod for heath reasons. If you’re anything like me you probably use your camera quite a bit and after a while of carrying around heavy camera equipment it can take a toll on your back, just ask any wedding photographer and I’m sure they’ll agree with me……

Source: fstoplounge.com

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The Mirrorless Debate | Alien Skin Software

We’ve all heard different opinions about the fancy new mirrorless camera systems available today. Some photographers have made the change while others don’t think it wise. I asked a bunch of Alien Skin’s photographer friends to share their thoughts about adopting a mirrorless rig as their main camera. Their responses have really helped solidify my now undying desire to own one. Thanks for spending my money, guys! ;-P You may notice how much controversy there is over these little beasts. It reminds me of the quarrels over film and digital capture in the beginning. Is the market headed that way? What do you think? ……

Source: www.alienskin.com

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Profi oder doch nur Amateur? | Patrick Ludolph

Immer mal wieder stolpere ich über eine Diskussion zum Thema Profi vs. Hobbyfotograf, bzw. Amateur. Dabei schwingt unweigerlich auch eine Diskussion über das jeweilige Können des Fotografen mit. Dem Hobbyfotografen stellt man gerne das kleine Wörtchen “nur” voran und degradiert ihn damit. Er ist ja nur Hobbyfotograf. Dem Profi wiederum wird generell unterstellt, dass er ein gewisses, vermeintlich hohes, Niveau bei der Fotografie an den Tag legt. Der Hobbyfotograf stellt sich auch mal unter den Scheffel und macht sich klein. Da kommen dann so Äusserungen wie “Equipment xyz ist nichts für mich, bin ja nur Hobbyfotograf”. Dabei ist es löblich, dass ein Hobbyist sich nicht aufblasen möchte und seien Platz in der Rangordnung unter dem Profi einnimmt. Wie kann man sich auch nur anmassen sich mit einem richtigen echten Profi auf eine Stufe zu stellen. Bescheidenheit ehrt. Nüchtern betrachtet ist das aber alles Bullshit…….

Source: neunzehn72.de

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