Aspects of Digital Photography

Camera Raw 8.6 and Lightroom 5.6 Now Available! | Adobe

For more information on Camera Raw 8.6 and Lightroom 5.6 – including new camera support and bug fixes – please view the release notes on the Lightroom Journal blog. Or, click here for Camera Raw and click here for Lightroom…..

Source: blogs.adobe.com

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Crop or Crap :: Math or Moment | Dedpxl

So why am I back pedaling now? I started shooting personal work with my little Fuji. Then I pulled it out on jobs from time to time because I loved that little camera. Then I used it more. Then I got the X-Pro1. Then I started seeing my Fuji images in print. Then I started putting the Q&A book together and I had the chance to run pages of test prints for the book. I printed every type of image I had from every camera I had owned. Studio shots. High ISO shots. Portraits. Street photos. I cropped into some images and enlarged them to full page. I received the test prints back and I taped them to the wall and took one step back. My Fuji images ran side by side with D3 and 5d2 images without a single noticeable drop in quality. If anything, my Fuji images were just a tad sharper. My PhaseOne medium format images were the only images that had a noticeable change in quality when I looked at everything side by side…….

Source: dedpxl.com

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Crop or Crap? Zack Arias Tackles The Question Of Full Frame vs
Crop Sensors | SLR Lounge

Zack Arias is one of the biggest names in photography education of recent years. He built his name on the idea that a photographer can use one light to create stunning images. Today, I am sharing a recent video Zack did tackling the age old (haha, not really) question of Full Frame Sensors vs APS-C Sensors. “I have said, in the past, that you should move toward full frame sensors. I have always championed full frame sensors.” Zack states in the description of his video, “At the end of the day, full frame sensors beat APS sized and smaller sensors.” …….

Source: www.slrlounge.com

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Light, Form, Function – Breaking Symmetry | Sven Schroeter

Ever since Silo park opened to the public and was transformed into a recreation area, it has become an increasingly popular photographic subject. The tall standing towers, with stairs spiralling to the top, are perfect for symmetric, abstract, fine art images. The key when chasing symmetric patterns is discovering the element which breaks the symmetry, regaining balance and automatically providing the focal point for your eye to gravitate to. Consider the first image, the stairs are balanced with the black cut out on the bottom right. Without these two elements, and just the pipe guiding your eye to the top of the tower, there is very little interest. The tower as a whole is symmetric, including the placement of the pipe running up the middle. But the inclusion of the stairs and the tower cutout break the symmetry and encourage your eye to wander throughout……

Source: www.bokeh-monster.com

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What is a macro lens? Magnification and minimum focus
distance explained | Digital Camera World

Our photography cheat sheet answers the question ‘What is a macro lens?’, explaining the different magnifications and minimum focus distance….

Source: www.digitalcameraworld.com

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Transformational Imagemaking: An Interview with Robert Hirsch |
Photo.net

….my position has been that all photographs are constructions. The “window on the world” point of view is based on where the photographer is standing, the time of day, the quality of light, what equipment and processes are utilized, what is included and excluded in the frame, and so on. What determines the photographic outcome we see in magazines, museums, galleries, and in all forms of media are largely determined by this realistic perception mindset. I’m interested in haptic imagemakers who are expressionistically interpreting their subject matter. In place of an outward linear narrative, these artists often rely on an inner psychological approach to their storytelling. This encourages their unconscious to come to the fore and reveal multiple pathways for viewers to explore both the subject matter and the maker. Regardless of their approach, these artists delight in the act of picturemaking……

Source: photo.net

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Using an external lightmeter for accurate, failproof metering |
Thorsten Overgaard

The advantage of using an external light meter is that you deal with an absolute reading of what light there is, not what the reflection is from some default background. Important: If you look at the white bubble on the lightmeter you can see that it is held in an angle so the light and shadow on each side equals the light on the face (the window highlight to the left and the shadows from the room to the right). It is an artistic decision where to hold the light meter, because if you tilt it a bit to the left in this picture it will pick up more light from the window and give a slightly darker exposure. If there is strong light coming in from the window that would be an idea as you then make sure the bright side of the face is correctly exposed, whereas the shadow side of course till be darker (as the whole exposure gets darker)………
 
Source: overgaard.dk

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4 x 3, 3 x 2, 16 x 9, 1 x 1… What’s the Ideal Image Aspect Ratio? |
Theme

There is no ideal image aspect ratio. Depending on the situation, each and every crop ratio has its own pros and cons. Personally I prefer the more landscapy 3 x 2 format, digital imaging’s equivalent to film’s classic 35mm proportions. To some it seems unnatural. Also, the more squarish 4 x 3 offers better corner performance. With all the aspect choices digital cameras offer, which one to go for? If you’re one of the few human beings left who prints photos, most labs will print uncropped if you ask them to. If you don’t specify they will usually fill the paper size or chop off the borders, notwithstanding the possibility that a group portrait of your Micro Four Thirds camera just lost auntie Ann and uncle Joe. Aspect ratios matter………

Source: www.the.me

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Why Sharpness is Overrated in Street Photography | Eric Kim

Sharpness is over-rated in street photography. Even Henri Cartier-Bresson once said, “Sharpness is a bourgeois concept.” I remember when I first saw one of HCB’s exhibitions in person in Paris, I was surprised by how soft most of his shots were. And many of his photos were significantly out of focus (thinking about the famous shot of the man in a bullfighter’s ring in Spain (above). When I stated street photography, I was obsessed with sharpness. This of course, was due to all the nerds on gear forums who showed corner to corner sharpness tests on brick walls. I was suckered into thinking a sharp photo was a good photo. However once I discovered the work or Daido Moriyama, I realized that a good photo didn’t need to be sharp. In-fact, a grainy, out of focus, and soft photo often had more mood, emotion, and soul than an uber-sharp photo…….

Source: erickimphotography.com

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The ART of BOKEH | Sven Schroeter

Not only is Bokeh beautiful, but it also happens to be a key story telling element. Once understood, it will open your eyes to new opportunities and improve your work by adding additional punch, wowing your audience. Our band name ‘Bokeh Monster’ came from the frequent use of the technique; shallow depth of field is one of the many ingredients to our unique style. By removing the distracting elements from a background through the use of shallow depth of field techniques, everyone we photograph can be compared on a even playing field. Context and placement are subtracted from the distraction equation, isolating and honing in on a subject’s beauty for honest appreciation…….

Source: www.bokeh-monster.com

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