Fuji X-E1

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 R | Jim Fisher

Photographers who shoot with the Fujifilm mirrorless camera system have a distinct choice to make when shopping for a short telephoto prime lens. The company sells two versions of its 56mm prime—this Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 R ($999.95) and the Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 R APD. It’s not just the cost of printing APD on the lens that carries a $500 premium—the apodization filter included in the pricier lens promises to smooth the defocused parts of an image for a more pleasing bokeh. Whether or not that’s worth it to you is something you have to decide for yourself—either lens is able to capture sharp photos with a staggeringly shallow depth of field with ease. But neither quite matches our Editors‘ Choice short telephoto lens for the Fuji system, the longer Fujinon XF 90mm F2 R LM WR……..

Source: uk.pcmag.com

Using Manual Lenses With the Fuji X System | Roy Cruz

It’s the lunar new year here in Korea, so I’d like to wish you all 새해복많이받으세요 (best wishes for the new year)! I’m at my in-laws’ place for the holidays so I thought I’d do a bit of blogging between the food, drinks, and karaoke :D. Using manual lenses with the Fujifilm X system is a great option to experiment and expand your camera system.  Third-party lens manufacturers such as Samyang produce very high quality and relatively affordable manual focus lenses.  Moreover, numerous adapters on the market open the doors to endless possibilities that span multiple brands and decades worth of lenses.  From Canon to Nikon, M42 to Leica, the rabbit hole goes very deep for using adapters and lenses for your Fuji X.  Yes, you lose autofocus functionality, but the manual focus assist options provided by mirrorless cameras has made manual lenses very easy to use. Personally, I went for a combination of modern third-party and classic M42 screw mount lenses……..

Source: blog.roycruz.com

FUJI X-Pro2 / XF100-400 / hi-ISO | Peter Fauland

One question I get asked on a daily basis now is how the new 24 MP FUJIFILM X-Trans III sensor performs in the hi ISO region above ISO 6400. Partner in crime was the new FUJINON Super-Zoom lens XF100-400  1:4,5-5,6 R LM OIS WR. In order to find out, I used a rainy and dark night in Hamburg’s Hafencity for a little test shooting under harsh conditions. It was super windy – even with a heavy tripod in use the camera was constantly vibrating. Being sceptic about the sharpness of my images changed to a big smile on my face, looking on the LCD-screen of the X-Pro2 : The performance of the image stabilzer was visible right away……..

Source: blog.fauland-photography.com

Fujifilm XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Review | Photozone

Verdict

I’m sorry to say that the Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR disappoints a bit although we had high hopes really. It’s a chunky lens. And chunky is usually a good thing because large glass and a complex design tends to translate to a fewer design compromises. The reality is, however, that the Fujinon relies heavily on image auto-correction because its original characteristics are less than thrilling. The original distortions as well as vignetting are rather massive. Now that being said most users will keep the camera and/or raw-converter to default settings so you will enjoy low distortions – at cost of image interpolation especially at 16mm – and low vignetting – at cost of increased corner noise. The Fujinon is generally a sharp lens without major weaknesses here. The sweet spot is at the wide end which has an exceedingly sharp image center and a very good outer image field. The performance deteriorates a bit towards the long end of the zoom range but the quality remains acceptable without impressing though. The quality of the bokeh is good for a standard zoom lens but not comparable to primes, of course………

Source: www.photozone.de

Fujifilm XF16mm f/1.4 Review and Images – The New Fast Aperture… | Matthew Maddock

The “Fujinon Nano-GI XF16mm f/1.4 R WR” lens, to give it it’s full name, is one I’ve been looking forward to for a while.  The majority of my shooting is between 24-50mm (in 35mm full-frame terms).  That range probably makes up about 95% of my images.  With the XF23mm f/1.4 and XF35mm f/1.4 there was a fast aperture hole in that range for me.  Until now I’ve been using the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 lens to fill that gap.  I never did go for the XF16-55mm f/2.8 lens as it lacked OIS, was far more expensive and much larger than the XF18-55mm, which really is a truly fantastic lens for what many consider to be the Fujifilm ‘kit’ lens. Now that the XF16mm f/1.4 has been released we have a full range of fast primes at the wide to standard range focal lengths.  If you add in the 56mm and newly released 90mm then there is probably a fast prime lens that would suit pretty much anyone these days who shoot with an X-Series camera……

Source: photomadd.com

Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR ( Fujifilm ) Review | Photozone

Verdict

The Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR is a great addition to Fujifilm’s lens lineup. It is ultra-sharp in the image center. The borders are outstanding at 50mm and still more than just decent at longer focal lengths. Lateral CAs are irrelevant which also helps to boost the high image quality perception. Most users will keep image auto-correction activated thus neither distortions nor vignetting are issue in this case. The native characteristic is worse here though. The quality of the bokeh is high for a zoom lens although prime lenses can be better still. Bokeh fringing isn’t really an issue at f/2.8. Fujifilm is targeting the professional market with this lens so the build quality is on an accordingly excellent level. Most body parts are made of metal and the broad, rubberized control rings are a joy to use. Everything is tightly assembled and the constant physical length as well as the weather sealing complete the positive impression…….

Source: www.photozone.de

Fuji XF 10-24mm: The Essential Lens for Real Estate & Architecture Photography | Eye Beam Images

After graduating college over 25 years ago, I worked for two years as a photo assistant to an architectural photographer. This was great technical training, as I had to handle heavy 4×5 and 8×10 view cameras on location, shooting with very slow, Kodak Ektrachrome Tungsten sheet film. The work was physically demanding and technically challenging. But it paid off in bringing my technical skills to a much higher level than that I had from my college education. Jumping forward in time: Over the last three years, I’ve been doing photography for real estate advertising and marketing. The city I live in is a hotbed of real estate activity, so there’s huge demand for photography, virtual reality and video when it comes to marketing homes. Last year alone, I was at over 750 photo shoots, both conventional still photography and virtual reality……

Source: eyebeamimages.wordpress.com

Taj Mahal III – Love Letter to the Fuji XF 14/2.8R | Little big traveling camera

In my previous blog post of my visit to the Taj Mahal all shots were taken with the kit lens. In this blog post they are taken with my favorite Fuji lens – the XF14/2.8 R. As I moved closer to the Taj Mahal it was clear to me that now is the time for the 14mm lens. I already praised this lens a lot on my blog. If you scroll down to take a look at the tag cloud of my blog you can see that the 14mm is my main lens and there is a reason for it. The 14mm (or 21mm in full frame terms) is a surprisingly flexible lens. It has many advantages not only over the kit lens but also over the 10-24 but of course it depends on your shooting style and subject if you value them as much as I do. Here are the most important ones:
 

  • zero distortion
  • small and light
  • wide but not too wide
  • offer a focus clutch for easy manual focus (and zone focus)
  • uses the same lens hood than the kit lens……..

Source: www.littlebigtravelingcamera.com

Fujifilm X series | Mohamed Hakem

Whats all the fuss about fuji cameras? Are they really any good? Are they a poor man’s Leica? Or Just a miniature SLR? Are they really Quality cameras or just another bridges semi professional alternatives to Canon and Nikons P and L series. Unfortunately some people doesn’t know Fuji or know them only by their Studios and cheap point and shoot cameras. Some people think that they are just another Tokina or Sigma companies who make second grade cameras and lenses for top brands. But the truth is that Fuji are not any of those, Fuji is one of the founders in the photography field. Fuji make lenses and films many years before canon was born. Fuji make Top grade lenses, when I say top grade I’m not referring to Nikkor Lenses and Canon’s L series, But to 99,000$ and 200,000$! Yes 99 thousands. Fuji make medium format sensors and they really know how to make sensors in general, not like Nikon who borrows it from Sony. They also help in the design of Hassleblad cameras, for those who don’t know what a Hassleblad is, it is a medium format camera which means that it features a bigger sensor than the full frame 35mm…..

Source: www.hakemphotography.com

Fuji XF 27mm F2.8 Review: Pancake Lens For The X Series | Patrick Leong

If you want something that will produce excellent results all while maintaining a compact form, a mirrorless camera is hard to beat. To match the small size of some of these mirrorless cameras, many manufacturers have built their own version of a “pancake” lens. Fuji has a couple of lenses that are very compact like the XF 18mm F2 but the XF 27mm F2.8 is their first official pancake lens. The truth is, I didn’t have much desire to try this lens when it was first released. It didn’t seem like it had that many qualities that would help it stand out from the rest of the XF lenses other than its compact size. But when I was planning for my trip to Walt Disney World, I wanted a very compact system, so I wouldn’t have to lug around so much gear in a place where there are long lines and a lot of walking. I brought with me a Fuji X-T10, and I decided to give the XF 27mm a try because the focal length was right between a traditional 35mm and 50mm, and therefore, my thought was that this one lens coul get me through my trip. Plus, I thought the ultra compact size would be a great match with the small dimensions of the X-T10. Here are my results from this lens and what I think of it…….

Source: findingrange.com

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