Reviews

Fuji X-E1 review – a photographer camera | Andrei Nicoara

I bought the Fuji X-E1 in January, and I am very satisfied with it. I really think that it is  ’best digital camera of 2012′ as I do not know which other camera should receive that award. I find it that good! Previously I used the very good  Fujifilm X10, about which I wrote a few times. However I wanted a camera that provides me with better image quality and more varied tools. Is the Fujifilm X-E1 the right choice? In this review – which will be split in several parts – I hope to answer this.

Update: Adobe has released the Adobe Camera Raw 7.4 which greatly improves the support for Fuji X-E1 Raw files. Until now I think it was better to shoot Jpegs (gorgeous) than to struggle with Raw files. However, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom have now improved support.
You can jump straight to my comparison of before and after Raw processing in Photoshop Lightroom.
 
My Fujifilm X-E1 kit consists of: X-E1 + XF 18-55mm ($1399 on Amazon) and the XF 35mm lens (for $599). The Fuji X-E1 is the second interchangeable body in Fujifilm mirroless system, and keeps most features of it’s more expensive predecessor – the X-PRO1. A camera system, as opposed to compact digital cameras, is only as good as the lenses available for it. Fujifilm X interchangeable lens system is pretty young and has only a small number of lenses compared to Canon or Nikon. However the lenses launched until now are very good.

update: to see a photo gallery with photos shot with the Fujifilm X-E1 and the XF 18-55 you can view my photo gallery from Rome. I also added a new pictures gallery, this time from Pompeii. I took all the photos with the Fujifilm XF 18-55 which I like more and more……

Conclusions

This is an ongoing review, so i will expand on different points. For me using the Fujifilm X-E1 is a new experience and a learning process. I really hope to understand all the quirks, and put to use all the best features.

I bought the X-E1 as a travel camera. My main usage for the camera – I thought – was going to be travel photography. However, the more I shoot with the new Fuji I realize what a well-rounded camera it is. I have shot the Fuji at a press conference recently and I am very happy with the results. The biggest quality of life improvement for me was the quality of the camera output. I have to edit the files in Lightroom far less than before.

See on andreinicoara.com

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Review Fujifilm X-E1 | CameraStuffReview

We already published a few Fujinon XF lens reviews (Fujinon XF 60mm macro and the Fujifilm XF 18-55mm), but this Fujifilm X-E1 review is our first Fujifilm camera review. The Fujifilm X-E1 was announced in 2012, just before the Photokina. This camera is in many aspects very similar to the early 2012 Fujifilm X-PRO, but the X-E1 is more economically priced. This price advantage is due to the omission of the hybrid viewfinder, in favor of an electronic viewfinder with a higher resolution. Also, the screen on the back of the camera has a lower resolution. The Fujifilm X-E1 is, like the Fujifilm X-PRO, a high-end camera. The target audience for this camera consists of passionate amateur and professional photographers who want a handy camera, but with an exceptionally high quality…..

Conclusion Fujifilm X-E1 review

The Fujifilm X-E1 is a beautiful, solid and easy to use camera with high image quality. In terms of resolution, dynamic range and signal to noise ratio, this camera equals a professional SLR camera with a full frame sensor. It is an ideal camera for travel photography or street photography. Your presence will be much less obtrusive than with a professional SLR camera. But the image quality will be of the same high level. The image quality of the jpg files is so good, that for almost every photographer there’s no real need to shoot in RAW. The Fujifilm X-E1 is a camera that gives you the fun in photography and lets you forget all the technology that comes with it. The measurement results for this Fujifilm X-E1 review are shown in the Fujifilm X-E1 test report.
 
See on www.camerastuffreview.com

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Fujifilm X-E1 Review | ThinkDigit

Conclusion

The Fujifilm X-E1 is a camera that aims right at the heart of old-school photographers stuck in the new age. It employs a rangefinder design that is sure to attract many, but at the same time, its bulky, block-like design might not appeal to some part of the audience. But moving past the form factor, the images out of the X-E1 are absolutely stunning, requiring little to no editing for any sort of colour or contrast enhancement. The noise levels remain fairly low even through the highest ISO’s and Fujifilm’s X-Trans sensor does a good job of simulating film grain to lend an old-school look to the images (if needed).

The lens ecosystem Fujifilm has built for the X-E1 is quite nice, with a strong initial focus on prime lenses. There’s a 14mm f/2.8R, an 18mm f/2.8, a 35mm f/1.4 and a 60mm f/2.0 Macro. Fuji’s already added the 18-55 zoom and plans on bringing a 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 and a 10-24mm f/4.0 in the latter half of 2013, along with a new 56mm f/1.4 prime lens as well. All in all, the X-E1 is a superb camera with excellent image quality, but we just wish the AF module could keep up with the sensor’s performance. It would also be nice if the continuous AF mode just track focus and shoot off frames when the shutter button is pressed, instead of working on reacquiring AF. Leaving these few quirks aside, the X-E1 is one hell of a camera, a mirrorless that can actually function as a substitute to the bulky DSLR for many users. If you’re in the market for a DSLR, or want a camera system that will give you great images, then you might want to look at getting the X-E1.

See on networkedblogs.com

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Fujifilm X-E1 review – very classy mirrorless camera! | Ken McMahon

The Fujifilm X-E1 is the second mirrorless model from the company to use the X-mount. It was launched in September 2012 and has the same rangefinder aesthetic and analogue controls as its forerunner the X-Pro 1. In many ways the X-E1 can be seen as a slimmed down, more affordable version of the X-Pro 1, lacking the former’s hybrid optical viewfinder, but sharing most other features including the same 16 Megapixel APS-C X-trans CMOS sensor. Though it’s lost a hybrid optical viewfinder, the X-E1 gains a very impressive electronic one in its place. An OLED design with 2.3 million dots, it ranks alongside the Sony NEX-6 as one of the best EVFs currently in use. One of the biggest criticisms of the X-Pro 1 was its slow AF performance and Fujifilm has moved quickly to address this issue with improvements that claim focus times of 0.1s. X-Pro 1 owners will have been delighted to see similar improvement rolled out in a firmware update for that model. The X-Pro1 launched with three X-mount lenses and Fujifilm has announced announced two more including the Fujinon XF18-55mm f2.8-4 R LM OIS, the first zoom for the system, and the standard bundle for the X-E1. These bring the total number of X-mount lenses at the time of writing to five, with a further five planned for release in 2013. With its retro looks, analogue controls and unconventional sensor you might think the X-E1 was a niche product, but it’s a strong competitor for a range of mirrorless compact system cameras including the Olympus OM-D E-M5, the Sony NEX-6 and NEX-7, and Canon’s EOS M. In my review I’ve compared it with the Canon EOS M. Like Fujifilm, Canon is a recent entrant to this market. Its EF-M Mount has only a couple of lenses (though with an adaptor you can use your EF lenses) and, like the X-E1 it has an APS-C sensor. But there the similarities pretty much end. The EOS M lacks a viewfinder, has a touch-screen and is a thoroughly contemporary design more in tune with a modern compact than a 20th century rangefinder. This should prove to be an interesting head-to-head. Do these two radically different approaches to mirrorless compact system camera design appeal only to personal subjective notions of how a camera should look and perform, or is there more to it than that? Read my full review to find out…..

See on weeder.org

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Dublin in Fujicolour & First Impressions of the Fuji XE1 |
Thomas Fritzgerald

Now that Adobe have (for the most part) sorted out their issues with the Raw conversion of images using Fuji’s X-Trans sensors, I decided to bite the bullet and step back into the fuji ring. Since selling my X-Pro1, I’ve missed the wonderful colours that Fuji cameras produce. While I do get them with the X100, the fixed focal length limits the type of shots you can take. Anyway, my local camera store had a great deal on the XE-1 so I decided to give the X-Trans one more shot. I’ll have a full review in a little while, but I wanted to share some of the shots I got on my first trip out with it.
 
Some quick first impressions…
 
Colour is the key thing with fuji’s cameras. That’s what makes them so special in my opinion. The colour these cameras produce has a unique character to it that’s really beautiful. Operations wise, the camera feels very similar to the X100, more so than the X-Pro1. It’s very light too. In fact, I think it might be too light. I was getting a lot of motion blur from camera shake, even at high shutter speeds. I don’t have particularly unsteady hands, and it hasn’t been a issue with any other camera I’ve ever used, so I’m guessing it’s a balance issue. The lens feels heavier than the camera body, soI’m guessing this is throwing things off when I press the shutter. I’m going to get a half case and hopefully that little extra bit of weight might address this issue a bit. For the moment I was shooting on burst mode, so that the actions of pressing the shutter could be offset by taking multiple shots I’m not overly impressed with the sharpness either, which I know is surprising considering the Fuji’s reputation. I have the 35m 1.4, and it’s sharp for fairly close objects, but taking cityscapes, and anything with a lot of repetitive detail, the results are not nearly as sharp as the results I get from my Sony Nex-7 (and yes, I know that has more pixels – but per pixel sharpness is not as high). It could be a back focus issue with the lens, but the results look similar to those I  had shot before with the 35mm when I had the X-Pro1. Anyway, It could be just that it’s new and I’m being very picky. Close up detail looks fine. It’s weird. I’ll reserve judgement on that for a while. Over all the camera is much snappier than the X-Pro1 was, but I did only have it with the original firmware. It didn’t lock up on me once despite a whole morning of shooting (where as the X-Pro1 would frequently freeze for a few seconds while it figured out what it was doing) Autofocus is still pretty slow with the 35mm but I never found t so slow as to be a deal breaker. The zoom lens is much faster at focussing, but it’s not as sharp.

Anyway, I’ll have a more in-depth review at  a later day. For now, let the pictures do the talking ….
 
See on blog.thomasfitzgeraldphotography.com

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Fujifilm X-E1 Review | Tim Bray

What happened was, this month includes trips to Tokyo and the Big Island. And lately I’ve been reading about cameras full of shiny new ideas. So I decided to indulge myself; here are way too many words about the state of cameras in general and in particular the one I bought. SLRs are fat-bodied because you need a big glass prism to bend the light from the lens to the viewfinder. If you lose the prism, you free camera designers from a bunch of constraints. Most obviously, you can have smaller thinner bodies that are friendlier to hand and handbag…..

Nice Things About the X-E1

The viewfinder is just brilliant. If I have my glasses on I can compose on the back of the camera. If I don’t, I put the viewfinder to my eye; it’s got a proximity sensor and lights up automatically. The visual readout in the viewfinder is very good, and it’s got a diopter adjustment for less-than-perfect eyes. The ergonomics are nifty; there’s no mode dial! The aperture and shutter speed are visible at a glance and on manual dials, looking down at the camera top. If both are on “A”, you’re in full-auto mode. If you set the shutter speed you’re in shutter-priority, if you set the F-stop, you’re in Aperture priority, if you set both, you’re in manual. Which makes the mode dials on most SLRs feel kind of superfluous and stupid. The menus aren’t that great but you’ll never need to use them. There’s a button marked “Q” that brings up a grid of the most commonly-used settings. It’s stupidly quick and easy to twiddle what you need to. It’s a bit lighter than my K-5, and both the prime & zoom are a lot lighter than their counterparts. In particular, the X-E1/35mm combo is really a treat to hold in your hand, or to sling over your shoulder for hours at a time.

Below from left to right: Canon S100, X-E1 (with the 35mm F1.4), and K-5 (with that Sigma). The Pentax and Fuji are about the same width, but the Fuji (and its lens) are smaller along every other dimension. The camera makes outstanding JPGs, creamy-smooth and with great white-balance guessing. I shoot raw anyhow because I like fiddling with pictures in Lightroom (had to install the 4.4 beta), but you probably don’t really need to, and in some low-light shots the camera might do a better job at noise reduction than Lightroom ……

Of course, you still need to see what you’re shooting. One approach is the traditional optical rangefinder, as in the Leica M; a little window through the camera that looks out beside, not through, the main lens. Or you can take what the sensor is seeing and route it electronically to a screen on the back of the camera, or to a viewfinder you hold up to your eye, or both. Generally speaking, serious cameras which have managed to lose the prism are now called “compact format”. For a while, it looked like we’d say “EVIL”, for Electronic Viewfinder Interchangeable Lens, but that didn’t quite catch on; a pity.SLRs are fat-bodied because you need a big glass prism to bend the light from the lens to the viewfinder. If you lose the prism, you free camera designers from a bunch of constraints. Most obviously, you can have smaller thinner bodies that are friendlier to hand and handbag. Of course, you still need to see what you’re shooting. One approach is the traditional optical rangefinder, as in the Leica M; a little window through the camera that looks out beside, not through, the main lens. Or you can take what the sensor is seeing and route it electronically to a screen on the back of the camera, or to a viewfinder you hold up to your eye, or both. Generally speaking, serious cameras which have managed to lose the prism are now called “compact format”. For a while, it looked like we’d say “EVIL”, for Electronic Viewfinder Interchangeable Lens, but that didn’t quite catch on; a pity. I suppose this is partly a review of the X-E1, but if you want to know the most important thing (what kind of pictures it takes) just follow the blog for the next week or two. I’ll do a pictures-from-Tokyo series that covers a lot of different photographic styles. What Once We Called EVIL · For a while there, everything was either a point-&-shoot (meh) or an SLR (good); SLRs compete in a nice linear way around megapixels and sensitivity and ergonomics and lenses. I suppose this is partly a review of the X-E1, but if you want to know the most important thing (what kind of pictures it takes) just follow the blog for the next week or two. I’ll do a pictures-from-Tokyo series that covers a lot of different photographic styles. What Once We Called EVIL · For a while there, everything was either a point-&-shoot (meh) or an SLR (good); SLRs compete in a nice linear way around megapixels and sensitivity and ergonomics and lenses…..

See on www.tbray.org

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Fujifilm X-E1 Review | Digital Photography Review

Conclusion

Pros

  • Unique camera design makes you want to take pictures
  • Excellent JPEGs, little need to shoot raw most of the time
  • Reliable metering and AWB systems, good color (with choice of ‘film modes’)
  • Dials for exposure controls allow for easy check of settings by glancing at the top deck, particularly with prime lenses
  • Impressive image quality at all ISO settings – good resolution and low noise
  • Built-in flash is handy for fill lighting in a pinch
  • Film-simulations offer quick access to different color modes and black and white filters
  • Use of electronic viewfinder simplifies interface while maintaining most important features
  • Quick menu gives fast access to most digital controls not covered by dials or buttons
  • Built-in level helps when capturing landscapes
  • Various bracketing modes are easy to set via the Drive button
  • Relatively quiet shutter
  • Excellent available prime lenses

Cons

  • Built-in level isn’t always as accurate as we’d like
  • Relatively slow AF makes photographing children more difficult
  • Framerates in continuous shooting mode aren’t completely consistent
  • Camera disables RAW shooting without warning in some bracketing modes
  • Relatively low-resolution rear LCD compared to some peers
  • Panorama mode can result in visible banding in plain tonesAuto ISO often chooses too slow a shutter speed (specifically problematic with the longer primes)
  • Minimal control available in video mode
  • Continuous drive mode saves files with a different name, sorting them to the bottom
  • Large and chunky build won’t suit everyone

Overall Conclusion

There’s a lot to be said for form as well as function and there’s no question the Fujifilm X-series cameras elicit a certain response from those of us who enjoy both photography and well-built gadgets. What’s great about the X-series cameras and lenses is they don’t just look like old photographic tools, they integrate digital and analog controls very successfully. Also, the old-style analog dials are really excellent ways of helping conceptualize things like shutter speed and aperture, the two main elements of photography one has to understand to use cameras effectively. Those who already understand the concepts generally have no trouble understanding numbers on an LCD, but those who are learning can benefit from seeing the numbers laid out in a linear fashion; and the truth is I still find it helpful to turn a dial to adjust aperture, as I can do with the X-E1. For beginners, having that dial wrapped around the lens completely differentiates it from the body-bound shutter speed dial. When using one of the XF prime lenses, the main photographic interface elements are right up front and visible, in the form of physical dials. Photography students would do well to secure a prime lens for this reason (as well as others). Kit lens users will have to pay attention to the numbers on the LCD. But that’s not all Fujifilm did right with the X-series cameras. Their simple button arrangements also make accessing common functions convenient. Important functions like Drive mode, Exposure, and Autofocus are dedicated to three buttons left of the LCD – a good position to adjust each setting. At first having a button for Drive mode seemed unnatural compared to a dial, but Fujifilm’s inclusion of fast access to bracketing modes made those even more useful. The Quick Menu allows access to almost all the other important adjustments the average still photographer will want to make, including things like ISO, resolution, and aspect ratio. Only one analog control needs fixing: the somewhat loose Exposure Compensation dial, which can be rotated accidentally, both in the hand and when being carried around or put in and taken out of a camera bag. Of course, the elephant in the room is video. Although the X-E1′s design philosophy is based around giving you all the direct manual control you could ever need, this does not apply to video, which overall seems as much of an afterthought as it is in the X-Pro 1 and X100. For now, the X-series is simply not competitive with its peers in terms of video functionality. As impressive as the Hybrid Viewfinder is on the other cameras in the X-series, the X-E1′s electronic viewfinder is excellent. Compared to the X-Pro 1′s finder in electronic mode, the X-E1 offers a better and higher-resolution image, but of course it can’t pull of the X-Pro 1′s impressive trick of switching to an optical view for those times when you want a literal ‘window’ on the world in front of your lens. The X-E1′s EVF cannot replace the X-Pro 1′s OVF but if you don’t really need or want an optical finder, the X-E1 is clearly a better choice than the X-Pro 1, thanks to its superior EVF and lower overall cost.

See full review on www.dpreview.com

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Mirrorless Battle: OM-D vs GH3 vs X-E1 | Jordan Steele

This should be a fun comparison.  I have the pleasure of having three of the best mirrorless cameras around in my possession right now: a newly acquired Fuji X-E1 with 35mm f/1.4, my trusty Olympus OM-D E-M5 and the Panasonic GH3, fresh into my hands for review.  Expect full reviews of the Fuji X-E1 and Panasonic GH3 in the coming weeks. Anyway, I thought it would be fun to pop the Panasonic Leica 25mm f/1.4 on the two Micro 4/3 cameras and do a controlled studio shot against the Fuji X-E1 with its Fujinon 35mm f/1.4.  Due to the different sized sensors, these setups result in an almost identical field of view, with the 4:3 aspect ratio of the m4/3 cameras allowing for a little wider field of view in the vertical direction. The 35mm on the X-E1 is slightly narrower than the 25mm on Micro 4/3, however (equivalent to the field of view of a 53mm lens on full frame vs the equivalent field of view of 50mm for the Leica). As a result of this minor difference in aspect ratio and field of view, the crops you’re about to see will make the Fuji look like it is rendering things slightly larger.  All images were taken on a tripod with 2 second timer, and all were taken from the same position……
 
Conclusion

Well, the X-E1 is a camera with fantastic image quality, that much is certain.  Not surprisingly, it produces cleaner images throughout the ISO range and retains great detail.  Is the Fuji the best of these three cameras then?  In pure image quality from the sensor?  Yes.  In other ways?  Not so fast….  Wait for my full review of the X-E1 for more detailed discussion, but both the GH3 and OM-D are much more responsive machines when it comes to autofocus.  Still, Fuji has a winner on their hands.  It’s also great to see Panasonic put out a body with very high image quality to match the OM-D on the stills side.

See on admiringlight.com

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Fujifilm XE1 vs Fuji XPro1 Camera | Ben Evans


 

English Photographer Ben Evans compares the Fuji XE1 and XPro1 cameras in Barcelona. Hand-on photography with several photographs made with the cameras during the review.

The balance is that the Fuji XE1, while lacking the hybrid optical/electronic viewfinder makes up for this with a cheaper price, upgraded EVF (electronic viewfinder), built-in flash and slightly smaller size. It was therefore the ‘winner’ in this little hands-on camera test.

Many thanks to Hiromi from www.HiromiTorres.com for shooting this video! If you’d like to get in touch and contribute to a microphone for her so that future tutorials and reviews sound better, she’d really appreciate it!….

See on www.youtube.com

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Fujifilm XE1 Review | Kale J. Friesen


 
I joined the Fujifilm X-Photographers team at the beginning of 2013 so I decided it would be great do a quick hands on review, and talk about the things I love and don’t love about the Fujifilm X-E1. Although it’s not the perfect camera there are a lot of things that make this camera great for users that want good photographs, retro/clean styling and a variety of lenses to invest in.

Visit Kale´s website on:
www.kalejf.com/
 

See on www.youtube.com

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