Lenses and Accessoires

FUJINON XF 56mm F/1.2 R | John Caz

Fuji offers a light weight and very capable camera system with some of the best optics and I’m so glad I have switched because now I can finally concentrate on the photography. They currently offer 3 innovative cameras (XPro-1, XE-2 and X-T1) and some of the finest lenses I have ever used. And Fujifilm know a thing or two about making high quality professional grade lenses (look here). So far I have been blown away by the performance of the XF 18-55mm, XF 23mm and the subject of this review, the XF 56mm……..

See on www.johncaz.net

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How the Fujifilm X-T1 Shocked Me: A Quick Hands-On Overview |
Dave Kai Piper

When Fuji announced the Fuji X-T1, it didn’t take long to get my attention.  Just as the camera went on sale, the lovely people at Fujifilm asked me if I wanted to have a look.  I have used the X-T1 as a day camera for a while now and here is my little report on how this camera shocked me. At first, I was unsure if I liked the design, the button placements or even the smaller size and weight.  Pre X-T1, I was a huge fan of the Fujifilm X-Pro. I am still thinking the X-Pro is the right camera for me, but I was pleasantly surprised at just how good the X-T1 is…….

See on www.slrlounge.com

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Full Review: Fujifilm X-T1 and XF 10-24mm | Bigheadtaco

Conclusion:

When Fujifilm first announced the X-T1, I was busy reviewing the X-E2. I had it for almost 2 months, and I got to really know the camera. I looked at the specs of the X-T1, and thought it wasn’t such a big deal. Since most of the inner workings of the X-T1 and X-E2 were similar, why pay the extra $400 for weather-sealing, a larger EVF, and articulating LCD screen? It’s the same sensor, same processor, same operating system. I liked the balanced look of the X-T1 (looks a lot like the Contax RTS), but would it be worth the extra cost? At the time, I thought no, not for me. However after reviewing the camera, I’ve changed my mind, with a few reservations. The $400 price difference isn’t just about specific features, but the overall ergonomics and function of the camera. When you shoot with it, the camera just works. It feels good in the hand, it shoots quickly, the EVF and LCD is very powerful and functional, the build quality is excellent, and the design is just beautiful. I think the camera would be just as special without weather-sealing, and with better working buttons (especially the rear 4-way control dial), perhaps it would be even more beloved by owners of previous X-series bodies…..

See on www.bigheadtaco.com

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Initial User Report on the Metabones Speedbooster for Fuji X |
Leosilve

Unless you might think I’m writing about some new dietary supplement, or a miracle cure for (my) aging bones… The Metabones Speedbooster is a lens adapter with an optical element at its rear end. Ok, I probably lost most of you by now. Ho hum, just another boring gear review. Yup, but to my photog friends and camera buffs, this is one piece of gear you just might find interesting. So, read on! The Metabones Speedbooster adapters are available in several lens mounts, adapting various full-frame lenses to Sony NEX, Panny/Oly Micro 4/3, and Fuji-X cameras. The rear optical element (made by Caldwell Photographic) is a focal reducer, shrinking the full frame image by a factor of 0.71X. This means, the lens’ focal length changes by this factor and the intensity of the reduced image causes an increase in brightness equivalent to one full aperture stop! When you factor in the 1.5x crop of an APS-C sensor, a 100mm f/2.8 full-frame lens will have a field of view equivalent to 106.5mm f/2.0 lens when mounted on an NEX camera by a Speedbooster. Not too shabby huh?

See on www.stevehuffphoto.com

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Fuji XF10-24mm F4 R OIS | Kevin Mullins

A small selection of recent images taken with the amazing Fuji XF10-24mm F4 R OIS.

See more pictures on www.the-owl.co.uk

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Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS Sample Images | PhotographyBLOG


Ahead of our full review, here are 54 full-size sample images taken with the new Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS lens mounted on an X-T1 body. The Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS is a new ultra wide-angle lens for the X-system, offering a field of view equivalent to 15-36mm in 35mm terms. As well as offering a constant aperture of f/4, it also features optical image stabilisation and an aperture ring. A gallery of 54 sample images taken with the Fujifilm XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS lens…….


See on www.photographyblog.com

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Fujifilm 56mm f1.2 review | Cameralabs

Fujifilm 56mm f1.2 verdict

The Fujifilm 56mm f1.2 is an easy lens to recommend, most obviously because it’s the only game in town if you’re after a short and very bright telephoto with AF for the X-system. But that’s not to say Fujifilm has rested on its laurels and exploited a captive audience. The 56mm delivers the same great quality Fuji X owners have come to enjoy and expect from the company’s prime lenses and is sure to become an essential part of many kits. Indeed it could drive many photographers to the X system who may have previously been on the fence – certainly it makes the X system much more appealing to portrait and wedding photographers than before. With an effective focal length of 84mm, the lens delivers classic portrait coverage, but is also useful for taking a closer look at details. The f1.2 focal ratio may ‘only’ be equivalent to about f1.8 in terms of depth of field on a full-frame system, but can still easily isolate a subject against a creamy out-of-focus background. And in terms of exposure, f1.2 is f1.2 on any system, allowing the lens to be used in dim conditions without forcing the use of higher ISOs. But it’s not just about shooting close subjects with a shallow depth of field – point the 56mm at a distant landscape, natural or urban, and you’ll enjoy crisp details across the frame even at large apertures. It’ll also play well with the XT1′s superb continuous autofocusing, allowing you to successfully capture shots of subjects moving towards or away from you – so long as you’re using the nine central AF areas………

See on cameralabs.com

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The Perfect Angle | Anson Cheung

For street photographers, the 35mm focal length is the undisputed go to lens choice. Being wider than the 50mm but still retaining that normal field of view with a sense of peripheral vision. On a cropped sensored APS camera like the Fujifilm X-Pro1, a lens with a focal length of 24mm would provide the effective 35mm perspective. While Fujifilm does have a 23mm f1.4 lens that fit this segment, it took them quite a while to release the lens. And while, yes, the reviews have been great on this lens, and yes I want one, there are other alternatives. As many already know, one of the great things about the current crop of mirrorless cameras is that they are compatible, using the right adaptor, with many legacy lenses. As a Nikon shooter “previously”, I already have a Nikkor 24mm f2.8 AI-s in my arsenal…….

See on nineteen76.cheungs.com.au

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Fuji XF 27mm f2.8 review | Rory Prior

Earlier this year I decided to part with my X100 and just focus on building up my lens collection for the X-E1. It was sad to part with the X100, it was a lovely camera that’s taken some great photos, but after you’ve been using a faster more modern camera it’s always a bit jarring to go back to something a bit older and clunkier. As my budget wouldn’t stretch to a shiny new X100S, my choice of replacement X lenses were the 23mm f1.4, the 27mm f2.8 or 35mm f1.4. The 23mm while amazing, was really too expensive for me, and also a little bit large and heavy. I wish Fuji would offer a smaller and less expensive f2 variant. Between the 27 and 35 it was a harder choice, both were within budget and ticked the right boxes for sharpness, size and weight. Ultimately I decided the 35mm focal length (52.5mm equivalent) was a little long for my tastes and the truly tiny dimensions of the 27mm helped seal the deal…..

See on lightpriority.net

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First Look: Fuji 10-24mm f/4 Sample Photos and First Impressions |
David Hobby

At the Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi, I worked the entire trip with the Fuji 10-24mm, which was made for that place. Even at 10mm, you can’t hold it all as a straight vertical. So I keystoned it (pointing the camera up and getting converging lines) and brought the verticals back in Photoshop. There were a lot of people in the same spot shooting at this gorgeous mix hour. Many were in front of me. But with the X-T1′s articulating finder I held the camera up high over my head to avoid them. With the OIS, this unwieldy grip did not matter. Everything was tack. This is a good example of the Fuji 10-24mm f/4′s rectiliniear look, even all the way zoomed out to 10mm. This lens if going to make a lot of architectural and real estate shooters very happy. The 15mm (FF) equivalent of the Fuji 10-24mm zoom makes views possible that are not doable with less wide lenses. Even here, I was at 10mm, and pushing it to get everything within the arch. But what I love is how straight the lens is — superwide zooms just aren’t supposed to be this straight. They generally go from barrel to pincushion, with a straight-line moment happening about halfway through the zoom. This thing is remarkably straight through the range…….

See on petapixel.com

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