Fuji X-Pro1

Fujinon X Lens: Primes – Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD (Tested) |
William Brawley

Just when you though the bokeh of the original Fuji 56mm ƒ/1.2 couldn’t get any better, Fujifilm introduced a special version of their portrait prime at Photokina 2014, the 56mm ƒ/1.2R APD. The “APD” stands for apodization, by which a filter is introduced into the optical path that features a smooth, circular gradation that darkens toward the outer edge. This essentially provides a softer edge to the lens’s aperture and promises to provide smoother out of focus blur, but at the expense of some light transmission. Other than the new APD filter, the optical design and build quality is identical to the original 56mm ƒ/1.2R lens: the same number of aspherical and Extra Low Dispersion elements, and a solid, all-metal barrel construction. Like the non-APD model, this 56mm lens ships with a lens hood, soft pouch and front/rear caps. The APD model, however, also ships with a Fujifilm ND8 (3-stop ND) filter. Seeing as this lens’s main purpose is to be shot at wide apertures for maximum bokeh effect — and indeed, the APD filter works best at very wide apertures — Fuji thoughtfully includes the ND filter to help shoot wide-open in brightly lit conditions……..

Source: slrgear.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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Fuji 18mm F2 / Lens Review | Colin Nicholls

The Fuji 18mm F2 lens. Often overlooked and pitted for being the ‘worst’ of the X Lens lineup this little, almost pancake lens packs a pretty good punch for it’s size and can be had for a real bargain these days. This review [like all my others] doesn’t focus on charts and such, its real photos I take with this lens, all edited to my style its not so much about the quality and optical characteristics of this lens as it is about the kind of photos you can take with it. That being said this review is image heavy, to the point and will hopefully give you an idea of adding this little beauty to you kit bag will do for you, enjoy……

Source: www.colinnichollsphotography.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18mm F2.0

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Fujifilm 50-140 Review | Expat Photographer

Why do I like it?

I’m not an “in your face” street photographer. I’m more of a sniper – one shot, one kill – before I move silently along. Or as we said back at summer camp – take nothing but photos and leave nothing but footprints. What do I like: I can observe and shoot without being observed shooting. The Fujifilm 50-140 lens is weather-sealed – which in Hong Kong’s unpredictable climes is extremely useful. I really like the Fujifilm XF 35mm f/1.4R – but a 50mm equivalent only gets you so close. Until they release the XF 16-55 f/2.8R this giant Fujifilm 50-140 will do.


What I don’t like:

The AF speed, a thorn in Fujifilm’s side. While the lens AF is good it is not the fastest rabbit in the hutch. On more than a few occasions I’ve had to recompose and refocus the lens seems to hunt.  That said, some of my beloved Canon EF lenses (I’m talking to you 85mm f/1.2L) have focus issues. This is more of a Fuji system problem I believe than something with the Fujifilm 50-140 lens hardware. Would this prevent me from buying the lens? Not at all. The incorporate tripod mount is a tad strange. I like the Canon clamping designs much more. Removing the Fuji version involves undoing two screws, removing the mount and replacing the screws. Not ideal…….

Source: expat-photographer.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Comparing Apples and Pears – Fuji’s XT-1 v X-Pro1 | Dave Young

Having had my Fuji XT-1 for around 3 months now, it’s fair to say I’ve been itching to write a comparison review of it next to my well loved, but at times frustrating Fuji X-Pro1 for a while now. Following the recent firmware upgrade of both models, now seems to be a good time to re-appraise my thoughts on the X-Pro1 and how it fits in alongside the XT-1. I’ll warn you now though, this isn’t so much of a technical appraisal, rather a look, touch and feel kind of review. For sure, it appears my X-Pro1 has become something of a shelf queen. As much as it saddens me to say, when I reach for a camera now, it’s the XT-1 I reach for. With perhaps the exception of the X-Pro1’s fantastic looks, the XT-1 outperforms the X-Pro1 in almost every situation…….

Source: daveyoungfotografia.co.uk
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Fujifilm unveils Fujinon XC16-50mm II and XC50-230mm II
kit lenses for X-A2 | DPReview

Fujifilm has announced two zoom lenses which will be bundled with the new X-A2 in one or dual lens kits. The Fujinon XC16-50mm II F3.5-5.6 offers a 24-76mm equivalent range and has a closer minimum focusing distance than its predecessor (30/40cm down to 15/35cm). The XC50-230mm II F4.5-6.7 OIS provides a 76-350mm equivalent range on APS-C and appears to be otherwise identical to the Mark I model. No word on whether these lens will be available separately…….

Source: www.dpreview.com

Fujifilm X-A2 Preview – First Impressions | Mike Tomkins

Back in late 2013, Fujifilm introduced the X-A1, a new entry-level point for its X-series mirrorless interchangeable-lens camera line. At the start of 2015, it follows up with the updated Fuji X-A2, a closely-related camera that sports some very worthwhile upgrades. Key among the changes is a new LCD articulation mechanism on the rear of the camera. It adds just a fraction to the overall thickness and weight, but for that subtle difference, you get a more selfie-capable camera. (And at the entry-level, even on an interchangeable-lens camera, selfie capture is a pretty common use case.) As before, the screen tilts close to 180 degrees, allowing shooting at a variety of angles such as from-the-hip. The change is that now, at its full upmost tilt extent, it can be extended upwards from the articulation mechanism a short distance, better allowing it to be seen from in front of the camera. This extension mechanism also serves to put the camera in selfie mode, where a new Eye Auto Focus mode comes into play, ensuring focus sits in the right place. (It’s one of a number of new autofocus modes on the updated camera.)……..

Source: www.imaging-resource.com

Metz launches Mecablitz 26 AF-1, a pocket-sized flash for hotshoe
compacts and CSCs | Damien Demolder

Lighting manufacturer Metz is to introduce a new miniature flash unit that is designed to marry with small cameras, such as premium hotshoe-equipped compacts and compact system bodies. With a maximum guide number of 26m/85ft at ISO 100 the Mecablitz 26 AF-1 is many times more powerful than the flash units that come bundled with, or built-in to, this sort of camera – and indeed many don’t come equipped with a flash at all. Weighing 115g/4oz and measuring 63x85x85mm/2.5×3.34×3.34 in, Metz intends this model to be suitably small and light to match the portability of its target cameras – the Mecablitz 26 AF-1 will be compatible with TTL systems from Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Samsung, Olympus, Panasonic, Leica, Sony and Fujifilm. Hinged to bounce at up to 90°, the Mecablitz 26 AF-1 doesn’t allow swivel motion but it will work as a slave unit for the wireless control systems of all the models mentioned, with the exception of Fuji cameras……….

Source: www.dpreview.com

Fuji X Buyer’s Guide :: Accessories | Zack Arias

In wrapping up this series on FujiFilm X cameras, I’m going to talk about a few of my favorite accessories from batteries to straps to bags to odd ball stuff. Be sure to check out the first two posts in this series. The Fuji Cameras Buyers Guide and the Fuji Lenses Buyers Guide. Batteries :: The great thing about Fuji X cameras is how small they are. The bad thing about Fuji X cameras is their batteries are small as well. Smaller batteries = less juice. This used to be quite an issue with the original x100. If I was going to be out shooting with that camera all day I always had four to five batteries with me. The X100S brought better power management and I was comfortable with three batteries for a day. With the X100T I can head out with two fully charged batteries and make it through the day. That said, I’ll take three just in case. Same goes for the X-Pro1 or X-T1 for me……….

Source: dedpxl.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji X100T and VSCO Cam | Philippines | Jakub Puchalski

Believe it or not, but when leaving for the four-month family trip around Asia, I decided I need something smaller and more compact than my old Fuji X-E1. Since Christmas was only 4 weeks ahead, I gave myself a gift: new shiny black Fuji X100T. Compactness was one major reason. Another one was the Wi-Fi feature, which allowed me to travel without a laptop, but with a tablet and smartphone only. Thanks to this setup I was uploading pictures directly to my little dual sim Motorola Moto E (another great compact yet powerful travel companion), processing with VSCO Cam and posting straight to the social media (here’s my instagram profile). No need to carry heavy computer, no need to wait with post-processing (at least the initial one) until I’m back at home in April – I can share some of the pictures already now! Below you will find a sample of pictures taken with Fuji X100T (all SOOC JPEG’s) and slightly processed in VSCO Cam. In most cases I didn’t use the presets, just the basic exposure dials, because Fuji colors are so perfect most of the time. Regarding the camera itself, I’m still getting used to the new focal length (I was shooting almost exclusively with the 35mm 1.4 for the last three years), but apart from that I feel like I have finally found the one. I won’t go into details, because there’s already dozens of X100T reviews on the net. Let me just say that apart from the obvious advantages like improved speed and ergonomics, this camera simply has a soul. And I mean it when I say that: taking pictures with it is magical………..

Source: www.jakubpuchalski.com


Fuji X100T

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COMMENT: AF+MF Mode Update on X-Pro1 and X-T1 | Jeff Carter

….When using AF to select the point of focus it is critical when using the fast aperture lenses such as the 35mm f1.4 and 56mm f1.2 that the focus point is checked to make sure the focus is spot on. By keeping the shutter release half pressed you can use manual focus to fine tune before fully pressing the release to take the shot. Using the Electronic View Finder (EVF) and Focus Peaking you can easily see where the focus needs to be adjusted if necessary. Now on the X-T1 the camera will ‘Focus Zoom’ where the viewfinder automatically zooms in on the focus area so you can really see the focus point when using a very wide aperture. The X-Pro1 doesn’t have this ‘Focus Zoom’ function and this has its plus and minus points. I will explain. When I use AF I sometimes point the AF point at the part of the image I want to the focus to be on, half press the shutter release to lock the focus and then recompose in the viewfinder. Now with the X-Pro1 this is still possible because you can see the whole image in the viewfinder. However on the X-T1 when the shutter is half pressed the Focus Zoom operates and you can’t see the whole picture, so my normal method of working is no longer permissible when using the AF+MF mode…….

Source: macleancomms.blogspot.de
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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