Fuji X-Pro1

My New Favorite Lens: First Impression of the Fuji XF 35 | Rivals

The Fujifilm XF 35 wasn’t a lens on my „to get list“. It never made sense to own a 35, 50 and 85 (FF eqv.) focal lengths. It was just to close of a gap to me, but when my XF 56 went crashing down I was limited to only two options due to Fujifilm’s limited selection of lenses, grab the XF 35, or pay an absurd amount to get the XF 56 repaired. When the XF 35 arrived, I wasn’t impressed, it was slightly bigger than my XF 18, and it just didn’t seem like a killer portrait lens. I literally let it sit for a few days before I even mounted it. When I went out on my daily photography walks I either took my XF 18, or Helios 44-2 and made those units work for me. The XF 35 just didn’t get me excited, perhaps it was the horrid things I read about the slow AF, or maybe in my head it would never be my XF 56, either way I was bummed out and I started to question my purchase……..

Source: www.rivalsvs.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 35mm F1.4

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Fuji XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD lens — a hands on review | Tom Grill

My favorite full frame lens for shooting lifestyle is an 85mm wide aperture. On a Fuji X camera this translates to the 56mm f/1.2.  A main reason for this choice is that I want to keep the background very soft so it doesn’t interfere with the main subject, while at the same time retaining some story-telling detail in the out-of-focus area. I am often afraid of using full frame lenses at a full aperture of f/1.4, since it often means sacrificing some detail in the focused area. The Fuji 56mm lens is different. I find I can use it at f/1.2 with no loss in sharpness in my main subject. I have already posted a full hands-on review of the Fuji XF 56mm f/1.2 R lens. Since it is the same lens used to create the APD model, I will spend my time here in discussing the only difference between the two models, the effects of the apodization filter, and refer the reader to the other review for a fuller explanation of the similarities the two lenses share……..

Source: aboutphotography-tomgrill.blogspot.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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How wedding photography has changed over the last 16 years and
what all photographers can learn from it | Bradley Hanson

The first thing that comes to mind is that 16 years ago everyone was shooting film and newspapers were just starting to transition to the original digital cameras. 16 years ago brides were reading their local wedding magazines. Now they are reading online magazines, print magazines, and getting dress/hair/makeup/decoration ideas from Pinterest.  They are definitely exposed to significantly more options than ever before. In 1999, very few people were shooting B&W or only shooting a little bit on the side. The photographic style(s) are significantly broader now, too. Around the time I started shooting, the movement was toward photojournalism and a more natural style, whereas before that everything was largely staged. It might be hard for new wedding photographers to imagine that! Once the movement toward documentary weddings was underway, there was no way of putting that cat back in the bag, and I am grateful for that! ……

Source: inmybag.net
 


Fuji X100S

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Why I kept my Fuji X Pro-1 | Scott Evans

With all the new fangled, fancy pants, digital gee-wiz-a-bang’s being released seemingly on a weekly basis, I decided to stop!  I decided to stop buying the latest and greatest version of what I already have.  I have the Fuji XT1 and love it but I also KEPT my Fuji X-Pro 1, and here’s why.

  1. Just because Fuji released something new does not make my X Pro-1 a bad camera.
  2. The B&W I get from the X-Pro 1 is more like film than any other camera I’ve used, X100s a close 2nd
  3. It’s focusing is fast enough, certainly faster than I can manually focus my Leica M6
  4. It’s a pretty tough camera.  In fact I have my XE-2 repaired from a slight drop where as the X-Pro 1 still works
  5. The X-Pro 1 fits my hands perfectly.  I love rangefinders and this is a rangefinder-ey as you can get……..

Source: instylephotographyblog.wordpress.com


Fuji X-Pro1

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Review: Fujifilm 16mm f1.4 R WR (X Mount) | Chris Gampat

The Fujifilm 16mm f1.4 is a lens that makes a lot of sense in the company’s lineup. Fujifilm’s strengths are with their primes, though their zoom lenses have started to become spectacular in the higher end category. However, very little else will appeal to the retro-smitten photographer like Fujifilm’s prime lenses–and the 16mm f1.4 is no exception. With nine aperture blades, a weather sealed body, metal exterior, a clicky aperture ring, and a depth of field scale that you can use for zone focusing, what’s not to like? While you can surely start off by saying that it costs a heck of a lot, you can also point out to a single major flaw that we found with the image quality. But overall, that’s just about all that you can hate about this lens. Even then, it’s very easy to stay in love with it.

Pros

  • Very sharp wide open
  • Very sharp overall
  • Excellent metal build quality
  • Focusing ring allows for zone focusing
  • Pretty decent bokeh for a lens of this type, despite having 9 aperture blades
  • Fast focusing performance
  • Weather sealed construction
  • Keeps distortion down pretty well

Cons

  • Depth of Field scale could have given us more focusing markers
  • More purple fringing than a modern lens should have despite it easily being removed in post-production
  • There are so many other things that you can do for just under $1,000.
  • Autofocus is just a hair too slow for street photography……..

Source: www.thephoblographer.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16mm F1.4

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Lensbaby expands offerings to Fujifilm X mount |
Digital Photography Review

Lensbaby has announced availability of several of its most popular lenses for Fujifilm’s X mount. The Composer Pro with Sweet 35 Optic, Composer Pro with Sweet 50 Optic, Circular Fisheye and Velvet 56 are all now available for Fujifilm’s mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras. The Velvet 56 is also now available for other mirrorless mounts including Micro Four Thirds and Sony E mount. Lensbaby’s pricing ranges from $299.95 for the Circular Fisheye up to $499.95 for the Velvet 56……

Source: www.dpreview.com
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

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An „All-Day-Lens“ – My experience with the XF16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR |
Sven Schroeder

I want to thank everyone for the response to my last blogpost!

Some of you asked, if I could write down my opinion for using the Fuji XF16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR as a „Every-Day-Lens“. So I own the lens for about 2 weeks now and I am really impressed with it. Before I go deeper into the „Review“ I must say that this is my own opinion. This blogpost is also not a technical type of review as you all may find many of those on the internet……..

Source: www.drawwithlight.net
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

A month with Fujinon XF 50-140mm F2.8 zoom lens | Jeff Seltzer

To be honest, I’m not really qualified to give any kind of super technical review of any equipment, especially a lens. There are lots of articles online discussing the important technical aspects of this lens — and each article that I’ve found has been decidedly positive. Indeed, the lens is very high quality and feels every bit worthy of its high price tag. It’s heavy, in a good way, with all metal parts and an overall premium feel. It feels good and substantial in the hand. I wouldn’t want to walk around with this all day, however. But the idea that it somehow doesn’t „fit“ the philosophy of a compact mirror-less system is silly — the equivalent lens on DSLR is much heavier. So, it’s still compact by relative standards. To be perfectly honest, I’ve never been a big fan of any kind of zoom lens, strongly preferring primes instead. But I wanted this lens for some particular purposes that could not be accomplished by my current crop of primes. I needed to get closer to my kids! I needed the extra reach when shooting my girls during their various activities including sports, musical theater, etc. I figured it would be great for candids, too. Yes, I purchased the lens primarily for documenting the most important thing in the world: my two girls……

Source: jeffseltzerphotography.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD ( Fujifilm ) – Review / Test Report |
Photozone

Verdict

So is the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD the magician that it is supposed to be ? Well, mostly. I reckon the sample images showed you that the bokeh is mostly as smooth as silk except in really difficult scenes (where most conventional lenses would fail as well). The rendition of out-of-focus highlights could be a little better though. Other than that, the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD inherits most of the characteristics from the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R. It combines an ultra-large aperture with high quality results. At large aperture settings the center quality is already pretty high whereas the borders/corners are at least on a good level. The resolution is much more snappy at f/2.8 and images are very sharp across the image field between f/4 and f/8. The very low amount of lateral CAs also contributes to the high sharpness perception. Image distortions are nothing to worry about whereas vignetting can be an issue in RAW images between f/1.2 and f/2. However, Fujifilm is relying on image auto-correction so this is usually a lesser issue from a user perspective……..

Source: www.photozone.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Review: Godox V850 manual Li-ion flash: a perfect manual flash for
my Fujifilm X-cameras | Piet Van den Eynde

As mentioned in my Lighting Gear page, I currently use three types of hotshoe flashes with my Fuji X series cameras: for on-camera work where I like to have TTL support, I use Fuji’s own EF-42 flash. It’s relatively powerful, and especially when bouncing my flash I appreciate the fact that the TTL system automatically calculates the required output setting. However, when I use my flash off-camera, things change: there currently isn’t a wireless TTL off-camera solution for Fujifilm flashes and as a result, I have been working with (and grown quite fond of) manual flashes. Now admittedly, I never really missed TTL for off-camera work: even with my Nikon Speedlights and cameras that supported off-camera TTL, I would almost always work in manual. I like the consistency, control and repeatability that manual offers. What I do appreciate, though, is to be able to remotely change the (manual) power on my flash. The two manual flashes that I use, do exactly that, and then some…….

Source: www.morethanwords.be
 


Fuji X-T1

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