Fuji X-Pro1

56mm ƒ/1.2 vs. APD | Fuji vs. Fuji

If I’m being honest, I was initially wondering what the difference was. The more I look at these images though, the more I can see the difference the APD filter is making in blurring out the background into a sea of smooth, dreamy, blurry, buttery, goodness. This makes perfect sense as it’s the trained eye that picks up on nuances like this. The kind of people I could see wanting the 56mm ƒ/1.2 APD are studio photographers who need their backgrounds blurred out and can have their focus preset, and especially outdoor portrait/wedding photographers where the lack of phase detect autofocus matters much less, and where backgrounds that are even just a little bit creamier can make the difference. I imagine someone out there somewhere has already attempted the Brenizer Method with the 56mm ƒ/1.2 APD, and it ought to yield incredible results……

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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What Fuji X camera and lenses should I buy? | Damien Lovegrove

Why I find the Fuji X system is faster to use than an SLR: With an SLR I used to either use aperture priority AV, A or manual M mode depending upon what I was shooting. Either way required me to take a test picture, assess exposure then adjust the settings or exposure compensation as required. I could then start shooting. If I missed out the review and adjustment stage I’d come back from a wedding with some strings of shots that were too dark or light. With the Fuji X system I shoot in M manual mode and it shows me the exact exposure and white balance I’m going to get before I press the shutter. I can tweak it as required and voila I get perfect exposures every time. No more exposure variations or test shots when I get back to the studio. The time saved at the shooting stage more than makes up for any difference in focussing speed……..

Source: www.prophotonut.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2

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Concert Shooting with the Fujifilm XF50-140F2.8 | Adam King

I recently had the opportunity to pick up the newly released Fujifilm XF 50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR lens to pair with my Fujifilm X-T1, just in time to take to a concert I was shooting at the House of Blues, Chicago (feat. Sister Hazel, Gregory Hyde, Borrow Tomorrow) . I am in no way attempting to hack together some type of scientific image quality review.  I’m just a shooter that enjoys shooting, and I have thoroughly enjoyed my experience transitioning to the Fuji-X system. Info on this lens is just starting to trickle in, so I wanted to share a few first impressions, real world experience, a couple of straight-out-of-camera full size examples where I can, and a few post-production shots. The X-T1 is my workhorse camera now, but prior to this concert, my most capable lens for tight shots has been the (exceptional) XF 56mm F1.2 . Concert photography is typically limited to the first 3 songs a band plays, and the atmosphere is usually hot and crowded, so I try to just bring just the essentials. On this night and I brought the XF 50-140mm, the Zeiss 12mm f/2.8 Touit (which is awesome for super wide, low distortion shots), the Rokinon 8mm F2.8 UMC Fisheye II, and the XF 23mm F1.4. This is an incredibly capable combo of lenses for concert photography. Perhaps I can cover my whole gear bag another time, but the hot lens out of Fuji right now is the XF 50-140mm, so lets check that out …….

Source: www.blog.adamkingphoto.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Review: Fujifilm XF 50-140mm f2.8 | The Phoblographer

The Fujifilm XF 50-140mm f2.8 is Fujifilm’s first serious entry in the telephoto zoom arena. Fast aperture primes have been Fujifilm’s bread and butter up until this point, and the XF55-200mm f3.5-4.8 was just a toe in the water. The 55-200mm was a swell lens to work with, but it left us wanting more, namely a fixed aperture. Now, we have it, and with the crop factor, it’s comparable to the standard 70-200mm f2.8 across the major manufacturers, without the white body. The 50-140mm f2.8 has every design aspect that has distinguished Fujifilm’s X-series from the competition, and it’s the first real sign of Fujifilm’s commitment to broadening its reach, to making it a well-rounded system. It’s a major boon for folks looking to do sports photography who might’ve felt left out by the lack of telephoto zoom options where a constant aperture is a must. It’s also a major plus for portraitists who want a little variety in their focal lengths. And hey, it’s weather-sealed, too, which means that there should be no excuses for your not shooting in rain, sleet or snow….

Source: www.thephoblographer.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Fuji XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS | Leigh Miller

First, thank you all for the kind emails over the past week. I had no idea so many people were wringing hands about the Fuji tele-zoom choices. I caused more indecision after that post about the new XF50-140mm F2.8 zoom though. It’s a good problem to have. My choices are much easier though as a professional. I need the constant aperture at F/2.8. Fuji cameras perform very well in low light and the image stabilisation helps a lot. Still, I need to squeeze as much shutter speed as possible in dark places like churches and reception halls. I have other practical reasons too…the new zoom is sharper at F/2.8 than the other two lenses are at F/5.6. Important to me as I tend to crop my wildlife images, products etc. The aperture ring also has a more positive feel and takes more effort to turn. No more accidental changes and add to that the weather resistant build. If however, I was an advanced enthusiast or budding amateur the XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8 R LM OIS would suit me very well. It’s lighter, fast-focusing especially on the X-E2 and XT-1 bodies. It’s virtues go much deeper and it took me a couple of months to appreciate it. Even then it was by accident. ……..

Source: leighmiller.zenfolio.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF55-200mm F3.5-4.8

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Review: One Week With the Fujinon XF 50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR |
Tor Martin Søndenå

I must admit that living with the X-series as my only system has been more challenging than I both hoped and thought before I changed my system. I was in love with the X-T1 from the moment it was announced and the previews started to appear online. As with every new love one are blinded by all the positive aspects and tend to overlook the negative ones. But after a while the first crush starts to fade and the negative aspects start to reveal themselves and the situation gets much more nuanced. From the day I received my Fujifilm gear I have had to compromise and work around issues that even my 10 years old fullframe cameras just did right. Some issues like the lack of High Speed Sync and IR AF assist light when using flash, I didn’t even consider before I switched. High Speed Sync and proper AF assist light had been around for so many years that I took for granted that Fujifilm’s external flashes had this. I have probably in almost every post on this site written about something that a pro DSLR just do right , but that you have to work around in some kind of way when using the X-series. Often this is just small things, but the X-series is still kind of immature and still lacks important pro features like a usable flash system. Ninety percent of the time my Fuji gear work brilliantly, but the 10 percent where you have to compromise are in best case annoying…….

Source: www.fujiboys.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Fujifilm Fujinon XF 50-140 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR review | Lenstip.com

The test summaries of the latest Fujinon lenses sound practically the same. Once again you deal with a very good device, optically and mechanically flawless, but with inflated price tag. If Sigma is able to produce a full frame, stabilized 70-200 mm f/2.8 lens and sell it for 3990 PLN and Tamron does the same for 4999 PLN why do you have to pay for the Fujinon over 6000 PLN? I know that the flagship 70–200 mm f/2.8 devices produced by Canon and Nikon are more expensive than the Fujinon. Still everybody understands why – they provide far more possibilities because, although their aperture is the same, you get a shallower depth of field on full frame. Anyway if the depth of field doesn’t matter to you that much there is still an option of using on full frame 70-200 mm f/4.0 models produced by Canon, Nikon or the Tokina and paying for them over 2000 PLN less than for the Fujinon. Of course the aperture fastness will be worse so you’ll have to use longer exposure times or higher ISO values but nowadays it is not such a huge issue, especially as the full frame reflex cameras provide sensational image quality even at higher ISO and image stabilization systems can be as efficient as about 4 EV. If the price of the Fujinon 50–140 mm was lower the summary of its test would consist of superlatives only – after all it is really a superb, practically flawless lens. I am sure anybody who buys it will be delighted with the quality of images it provides and its overall performance. Unfortunately I suppose with such a price tag there will be not many buyers around……….

Source: www.lenstip.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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The People on the Green Line | Valerie Jardin

It’s been another crazy week. Mostly filled with podcast recording, workshop planning, writing and other office tasks. To top it all off, I was hit with a nasty viral bug that put me out of commission for 24 hours on the day that I had planned to go out with my camera! By Saturday nothing was going to stop me from heading out with my camera. I would normally take the x100s for this type of photo walk but I opted for the Fuji X-T1 with its new silent mode (thanks to its recent firmware update). I decided to ride the Green Line on the light rail between St Paul and Minneapolis and photograph faces along the way. No expectations, it is something I often do in other cities but not where I live. I did snap a few pics between short conversations with a few passengers. Ordinary people going about their ordinary lives on an ordinary winter day in Minnesota……

Source: valeriejardin.wordpress.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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Making street portraits (with the Fuji x100) | Olivier Duong

Neill Soden is a photographer currently living in South Africa. He has a Fuji X100 and shares how he makes his portraits with the camera. If I see someone I would like to take a portrait of, I’ll get all my settings ready before approaching them, so I am ready to start shooting at once. I set it with my Custom 2 (B/W) in the Q-menu and get my focus point in the desired position. I will switch to the EVF, as it allows me to see my exposure and lighting as close as possible to the result I will get. My black and white customs setting is B&W+red, highlights to +1 and shadows to +2. Auto ISO is on, so my Fn button is set to ND-filter if it is needed. The key is to do it as quick as possible. Try not to take up too much of the person’s time and not too intrude too much. I will walk up to them with the camera loosely by my side. Getting it pushed straight into their face will not be welcomed by anyone. After I greeted and asked how they are doing, I will ask if I can take the a photo. In the event of there being a language barrier, I will point at the camera and ask if I can take the image. If they happen to say no, I thank them and walk away. I rarely find people to not gladly accommodate you……..

Source: www.theinspiredeye.net
 


Fuji X100S

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First Impression: Fujifilm XF56mm f/1.2 R APD is Insanely Bokehlicious! |
Bigheadtaco

I’m Japanese and I’ve never liked the word ‘bokeh’. Yes, Japanese are famous for making up words (karaoke, emoji, cosplay, anime), some work, some are just weird. Shallow depth of field sounds a bit too technical for such an subjective ‘quality’, so someone had to come up with a better word. I guess ‘bokeh’ will just have to do for now, although I wish the Germans or Italians came up with a term first. Not only am I not fond of the word, I’m not fond of the pursuit of it, as if bokeh is somehow intrinsic to a good picture. In fact, as a street photographer I almost avoid it. I typically shoot F/8 and 1/750th of a second and I focus on composition and the decisive moment. When Fujifilm asked if I wanted to review the new XF56mm f/1.2 R APD lens, they assumed I would say no and I assumed I would say no as well. However, after looking at some pre-production images, I was intrigued (check out this link and this one as well). There was something about the out-of-focus area that was… should I say ‘bokehlicious?’ I wish I didn’t type that…

Source: www.bigheadtaco.com

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