Fuji X-Pro1

My thoughts on the WR 18-135 lens | Jonas Jacobsson

As some of you know already I got the opportunity to test out the latest Fujinon lens for the X-series during my trip to Iceland. Fujifilm Nordicwas kind enough to send me a sample of this weather sealed lens for me to make use of during this trip and see what it could go for. Iceland is (in)famously known for having extremely changing weather so it ought to be a great chance to test how well the weather sealing worked along with my X-T1. Generally I prefer prime lenses and that’s what I work with 95% of the time, much because I don’t like to compromise with focal length or with quality. I like having to move to get the right framing, and it has taught me a lot during the years. And as we all are familiar with the pure photographic quality of the photos will always be better with a prime lens. That being said, there are obviously moments when it’s really convenient with a zoom lens. Especially for traveling. Being able to walk around with just one lens that covers a wide range of focal lengths is very practical, both from not having to change lenses or carrying heavy bags with complimentary lenses because you can’t decide on which one to go with……

Source: www.jonasjacobsson.co

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London and Fuji strike again, with an evening detour to the BWPA |
Lizzie Shepherd

Earlier this week I made my second trip of the summer down to London – this time a flying visit of less than 24 hours. I had two reasons for going down. Firstly to attend the British Wildlife Photography Awards, having been delighted to find I had a photograph shortlisted and printed in the book. Secondly to visit Charlie Waite’s wonderful exhibition of both old and recent work at the National Theatre – I have long been a big fan of Charlie’s work and was so pleased the exhibition was extended by a few weeks, allowing me the opportunity to get down to see it.

Source: www.lizzieshepherd.com

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The New Fuji 56mm f/1.2R APD | Nathan Elson

All of the portraits above were shot in RAW with the Fuji X-T1 body combined with the new 56mm f/1.2R APD lens and processed in LR5 with my own black & white presets. The lens itself was a prototype, so until a full production version of the lens is released I can’t really give an opinion on things like the focus speed, manual focusing, etc. In regards to the lens, what’s new about it? Well, not a whole hell of a lot. It’s the exact same lens on the outside in terms of size, build quality, filter size, etc. It’s the insides that have changed, but as I said, it’s not a huge leap. Below is a side by side, using straight out of camera JPG’s using the in-camera black and white preset, with the exact same settings (ISO 200 – f/1.2 – 1/2000sec) with the image from the original 56mm being adjusted -1 stop in LR5 to keep the exposure consistent. For those of you wondering why I had to adjust the exposure when using the exact same settings, it’s because the original 56mm lens lets in roughly 1 stop of light more than the new APD version, so at the exact same settings the photo from the older version of the lens will come out a stop brighter. That loss of 1 stop of light could be a good or bad thing depending on the shooting situation, but its due to the APD filter they added within the lens………

Source: www.nathanelson.com

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Blood Brothers: the Fujifilm XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD | Patrick La Roque

So yes, the rumours were true: Fujifilm has announced a new, different version of their stellar XF 56mm f/1.2 R lens — the XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD. I’m stressing the word different as opposed to better and I’ll explain why in a bit. APD stands for apodized. This is a process by which an optical filter is introduced inside the lens assembly to modify the way it renders out of focus areas — specifically, to make them smoother. And because this filter gets gradually darker at the edges, it also adds a slight vignetting effect. And I do mean slight: light falloff more than any real darkening. I was fortunate to again be hired by Fuji to shoot samples for this version as I had done for the previous model last winter, along with my Canadian colleague Nathan Elson from Calgary (his stunning images are here; very cool shoot). But the deadline and turnaround were a lot tighter this time and I barely had a few days with it. The lens Tokyo sent in was a prototype with nothing but a yellow sticker to distinguish it from my own “normal” 56mm. Since it wasn’t anywhere near a production model, this isn’t a review at all — just a look at the photo shoot and a few personal notes. And btw, these images aren’t the same versions you’ll find on the official product page: we send in unprocessed raw files for sample use. No retouching, no sharpening. Nada. It’s a humbling experience if there ever was one. The photos here were processed in LR5 with my usual methods (although Capture One was used as well for some of these; more on that eventually)……..

Source: www.laroquephoto.com

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FUJINON XF50-140mmF2.8 R LM OIS WR | Fujifilm Global

FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Shigehiro Nakajima) is proud to announce that a new FUJINON LENS XF56mmF1.2 R APD will be added to the X-Series interchangeable lens lineup from December 2014. The FUJINON XF56mmF1.2 R APD is an autofocus lens for digital cameras with APS-C size sensors and provides a focal length equivalent to 85mm*. The lens has a maximum aperture of F1.2 making it the world’s brightest autofocus lens for digital cameras with an APS-C sensor. In addition, the new apodizing filter makes it the perfect choice for portraiture, with every strand of hair visible and a unique bokeh effect. This lens is highly portable. When attached to an X Series camera body, it weighs about half** that of a single-lens reflex camera with a lens of the same focal length and F value, plus it’s quick to use thanks to the high-speed, quiet autofocus. It produces not only beautiful bokeh part, but also maintain the sharpness with accurate focusing even in a shallow depth-of-field. This is advantage of Mirrorless system over SLR thanks to focusing on image sensor itself rather than on separate PD sensor. The shutter sound on X Series bodies is equally quiet, so it’s easy to capture more natural shots of subjects……

Source: www.fujifilm.com

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FUJINON XF56mmF1.2 R APD | Fujifilm Global

FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Shigehiro Nakajima) is proud to announce that a new FUJINON LENS XF56mmF1.2 R APD will be added to the X-Series interchangeable lens lineup from December 2014. The FUJINON XF56mmF1.2 R APD is an autofocus lens for digital cameras with APS-C size sensors and provides a focal length equivalent to 85mm*. The lens has a maximum aperture of F1.2 making it the world’s brightest autofocus lens for digital cameras with an APS-C sensor. In addition, the new apodizing filter makes it the perfect choice for portraiture, with every strand of hair visible and a unique bokeh effect. This lens is highly portable. When attached to an X Series camera body, it weighs about half** that of a single-lens reflex camera with a lens of the same focal length and F value, plus it’s quick to use thanks to the high-speed, quiet autofocus. It produces not only beautiful bokeh part, but also maintain the sharpness with accurate focusing even in a shallow depth-of-field. This is advantage of Mirrorless system over SLR thanks to focusing on image sensor itself rather than on separate PD sensor. The shutter sound on X Series bodies is equally quiet, so it’s easy to capture more natural shots of subjects……

Source: www.fujifilm.com

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Movement. The essence of Old Delhi | Tim Steadman

I’ve visited Old Delhi twice in the past 6 days. On both voyages, I went with a photographer friend whom I enjoy exploring Delhi with…he does his thing, I do mine, we swap thoughts, and we generally move in the same direction…be it a busy road, shady alleyway, or a muddy lane leading to the “cheese market.” On the first day, we arrived in the old city via the Delhi Metro at 7:20am. We gradually rose from the deep via 3 escalators and exited at Chawri Bazar…the largest, most hectic intersection in the old city. Its screw hadn’t come loose yet, but people were certainly on the move…mostly tiny school children in tiny uniforms holding hands and more school children whizzing past on motorcycles and tightly packed bicycle rickshaws. There was a general mood of excitement in the air……
 
Source: www.timsteadman.com

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March In August rally at Hyde Park, Sydney
(with Fuji X-Pro 1 & 56mm f/1.2, 18mm f/2) | Robert Catto

This weekend saw thousands of Australians take to the streets of cities across the country to protest the Tony Abbott / Liberal coalition government’s cuts to Federal spending in areas like education, health, the public sector, science and the environment, as well as their stance on immigration.  Sydney was no exception – and the march, starting and finishing at Hyde Park, featured a brief concert by local band The Jezabels at the conclusion of the event. I thought it was a good chance to test out the 56mm f/1.2 a bit more, and a few with the 18mm f/2 as well; but I was really enjoying the creativity of some of the signs & costumes people had made – and a few more that were added at the site, too……

Source: robertcatto.com

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Best X-Trans RAW Converter | Fuji vs. Fuji

Evolving Conclusion

I think it’s pretty safe to say that “out of the can,” Irident Developer produces the sharpest, most detail-rich images from X-Trans sensors. It’s actually pretty astounding. The developer seems to have figured out just the right amount of sharpening to apply to his demosaicing algorithms. I can’t believe this is one guy (with a little help from the open source RAW decoding program, dcraw). If you’re a Photo Mechanic or Bridge user on OS X, and you want the most acuity form your images with essentially zero effort, you’d be crazy not to take a long hard look at Iridient Developer. It’s fast, delivers excellent image quality, has the right controls, and the right level of fine-tuning. It could use a few usability tweaks and maybe a visual upgrade here and there, but the software is in very active development so perhaps those tweaks aren’t too far off. PhotoNinja is the runner up as an out of the box solution in terms of detail. I think I prefer the default colour rendering of PhotoNinja as well. There’s a richness and depth to it that’s only exceeded by Capture One, in my opinion. PhotoNinja is also $54 more expensive than Iridient Developer, is a pixelated mess on retina displays, and while it looks like a bit more detail can be pulled out of images with minimal editing, it also does some weird things to more delicate details like clouds. I’m also not convinced that the same results couldn’t be achieved with Iridient Developer with a bit more fine tuning. We’ll soon find out…….

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com

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The Luxury of Failure | Bert Stephani

Some nine years ago, when I decided to pursue photography as a career, it soon became clear to me that I needed a good base level in my work. An amateur photographer gets judged by his best images, a professional gets judged by his worst. I realised that I had to learn how to make my worst pictures good enough. I’ve spent lots of time and energy to raise that base level and over the years I’ve became capable of returning with at least usable images from pretty much any assignment, even when things go wrong. I still believe that this is a good thing and an essential skill for a professional photographer but we all know that playing it safe isn’t creativity’s best friend. About two years ago, I embarked on a long term personal documentary project about hunting in Belgium. I’m hoping to turn it into a book and an exhibition in 2015 but even if it turns out to be a success, I probably won’t make any money on it. The topic of hunting is rather controversial here in Belgium, so I don’t expect the project to become a showcase towards potential clients either. But it’s something that I’ve wanted to do for a long time: use my camera as a passport to satisfy my curiosity and the fact that I had a hard time understanding why anyone would hunt in this country. And even more importantly: no assignment, no client, no pressure, only … the luxury of failure……..
 
Source: www.kagecollective.com

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