Fuji X-Pro1

Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR ( Fujifilm ) Review | Photozone

Verdict

The Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR is a great addition to Fujifilm’s lens lineup. It is ultra-sharp in the image center. The borders are outstanding at 50mm and still more than just decent at longer focal lengths. Lateral CAs are irrelevant which also helps to boost the high image quality perception. Most users will keep image auto-correction activated thus neither distortions nor vignetting are issue in this case. The native characteristic is worse here though. The quality of the bokeh is high for a zoom lens although prime lenses can be better still. Bokeh fringing isn’t really an issue at f/2.8. Fujifilm is targeting the professional market with this lens so the build quality is on an accordingly excellent level. Most body parts are made of metal and the broad, rubberized control rings are a joy to use. Everything is tightly assembled and the constant physical length as well as the weather sealing complete the positive impression…….

Source: www.photozone.de

Fuji XF 10-24mm: The Essential Lens for Real Estate & Architecture Photography | Eye Beam Images

After graduating college over 25 years ago, I worked for two years as a photo assistant to an architectural photographer. This was great technical training, as I had to handle heavy 4×5 and 8×10 view cameras on location, shooting with very slow, Kodak Ektrachrome Tungsten sheet film. The work was physically demanding and technically challenging. But it paid off in bringing my technical skills to a much higher level than that I had from my college education. Jumping forward in time: Over the last three years, I’ve been doing photography for real estate advertising and marketing. The city I live in is a hotbed of real estate activity, so there’s huge demand for photography, virtual reality and video when it comes to marketing homes. Last year alone, I was at over 750 photo shoots, both conventional still photography and virtual reality……

Source: eyebeamimages.wordpress.com

Taj Mahal III – Love Letter to the Fuji XF 14/2.8R | Little big traveling camera

In my previous blog post of my visit to the Taj Mahal all shots were taken with the kit lens. In this blog post they are taken with my favorite Fuji lens – the XF14/2.8 R. As I moved closer to the Taj Mahal it was clear to me that now is the time for the 14mm lens. I already praised this lens a lot on my blog. If you scroll down to take a look at the tag cloud of my blog you can see that the 14mm is my main lens and there is a reason for it. The 14mm (or 21mm in full frame terms) is a surprisingly flexible lens. It has many advantages not only over the kit lens but also over the 10-24 but of course it depends on your shooting style and subject if you value them as much as I do. Here are the most important ones:
 

  • zero distortion
  • small and light
  • wide but not too wide
  • offer a focus clutch for easy manual focus (and zone focus)
  • uses the same lens hood than the kit lens……..

Source: www.littlebigtravelingcamera.com

X-Gene: A Love and Hate Story | Fujifilm X-PRO1 & X-T1 | Insignia Chiaki

I am happily married to my Nikon gear. But there’s always room for lovers. Right?  So before I tried out the Sony stuff, I’ve also found myself buying a X-Pro1 from Fuji. For about 4 months I used the Fuji for everyday snaps and of course occasional usage in portrait sessions; however, I have to say my experiences were… Let’s just say I was puzzled, and I’ll elaborate on that later. I ended up selling the X-Pro1 in mid-2015. When I eventually sold the A7 II, I decided to give Fujifilm another chance. This time with their flagship X-T1. Two months into my purchase, all I have to say is: WOW……..

Source: insigniachiaki.wordpress.com

Fujifilm X-Pro1 – still a force to be reckoned with! | KSG Photography

Unless you’ve been locked away in a CIA prisoner ship in the South Pacific, you’ll be aware that Fujifilm have now launched their long-awaited X-Pro2! However, the question still arises – does that mean the legendary X-Pro1 is down & out? In my, humble, opinion certainly not. Yes, the X-Pro2 has some great new features but that doesn’t take away the fact that the X-Pro1 is still a supremely capable camera in the hands of those who know how to use it. No, it’s never going to be a speed freak, but that’s not the be-all & end-all. The X-Trans sensor still delivers great results, even at higher ISOs and those awesome Fujifilm lenses mean the images are tack-sharp. I am fortunate enough to own all of the pro-spec cameras in Fujis line-up (X-T1, X-Pro1 along with the X100T and an X-E1 as backup) and a helluva lot of their lenses but on a recent job I decided that I would shoot with the original interchangeable X-series body and a couple of the original lenses……..

Source: ksgphotography.blogspot.de

Fujifilm X series | Mohamed Hakem

Whats all the fuss about fuji cameras? Are they really any good? Are they a poor man’s Leica? Or Just a miniature SLR? Are they really Quality cameras or just another bridges semi professional alternatives to Canon and Nikons P and L series. Unfortunately some people doesn’t know Fuji or know them only by their Studios and cheap point and shoot cameras. Some people think that they are just another Tokina or Sigma companies who make second grade cameras and lenses for top brands. But the truth is that Fuji are not any of those, Fuji is one of the founders in the photography field. Fuji make lenses and films many years before canon was born. Fuji make Top grade lenses, when I say top grade I’m not referring to Nikkor Lenses and Canon’s L series, But to 99,000$ and 200,000$! Yes 99 thousands. Fuji make medium format sensors and they really know how to make sensors in general, not like Nikon who borrows it from Sony. They also help in the design of Hassleblad cameras, for those who don’t know what a Hassleblad is, it is a medium format camera which means that it features a bigger sensor than the full frame 35mm…..

Source: www.hakemphotography.com

Fuji XF 27mm F2.8 Review: Pancake Lens For The X Series | Patrick Leong

If you want something that will produce excellent results all while maintaining a compact form, a mirrorless camera is hard to beat. To match the small size of some of these mirrorless cameras, many manufacturers have built their own version of a “pancake” lens. Fuji has a couple of lenses that are very compact like the XF 18mm F2 but the XF 27mm F2.8 is their first official pancake lens. The truth is, I didn’t have much desire to try this lens when it was first released. It didn’t seem like it had that many qualities that would help it stand out from the rest of the XF lenses other than its compact size. But when I was planning for my trip to Walt Disney World, I wanted a very compact system, so I wouldn’t have to lug around so much gear in a place where there are long lines and a lot of walking. I brought with me a Fuji X-T10, and I decided to give the XF 27mm a try because the focal length was right between a traditional 35mm and 50mm, and therefore, my thought was that this one lens coul get me through my trip. Plus, I thought the ultra compact size would be a great match with the small dimensions of the X-T10. Here are my results from this lens and what I think of it…….

Source: findingrange.com

Why DxOMark Doesn’t Test Fujifilm Cameras | Michael Zhang

If you reference camera sensor ratings published by DxOMark, you may have noticed that the France-based company doesn’t test Fujifilm cameras. It’s surprising, given that Fujifilm sensors have been praised by many reviewers in recent years. No, DxOMark doesn’t have anything against Fujifilm, and no, it’s not something fishy going on behind the scenes. The reason is simple: DxOMark isn’t currently able to properly test X-Trans sensors. If you look at the DxOMark database, you’ll see that the last Fujifilm camera they reviewed was the Fujifilm XF1 in 2012. That’s the year Fujifilm launched its new X-Trans sensor technology in the X-Pro1, and X-Trans sensors have appeared in Fuji X-Series cameras ever since…….

Source: petapixel.com

Let’s Get Up Close with Extension Tubes | Photography Statistics

If you want to get up close to your subject, closer than you can by setting your lens to its minimum focusing distance, then extension tubes are an excellent way of doing so. When you turn the focusing ring of your lens away from infinity, the front element moves out from the lens body. The distance between the front element and the sensor (or film) plane is called extension. When your lens is set to its minimum focusing distance, the front element can move no further forward. You have reached the limit of the lens’s design. An extension tube is a hollow tube that fits between your lens and camera body. It moves the lens further away, increasing the extension of the front element……

Source: photographystatistics.com

Fujifilm 90mm f2 review | Cameralabs

The Fujifilm XF 90mm f2 is a bright telephoto prime lens for X-series bodies. Announced in May 2015, it’s the longest prime in the X-series, delivering classic telephoto coverage of 135mm that’s ideal for portraits at a comfortable distance, along with capturing close-range sporting action. The f2 focal ratio allows you to easily achieve shallow depth-of-field effects at this focal length while the seven-bladed rounded aperture promises well-behaved bokeh as you stop down. A newly-developed quad-linear motor claims fast and quiet autofocus, and like most recent Fujifilm lenses, the XF 90mm f2 is sealed against dust and moisture. The XF 90mm f2 fills an important gap in the catalogue for those who, like me, prefer to shoot with primes than zooms, and promises to become a natural partner for the XF 56mm f1.2 for anyone who shoots a lot of portraits or chases shallow depth-of-field effects. In my in-depth review I’ll put it through its paces, paying particular attention to the rendering of blurred areas as I believe this will be of utmost importance to potential owners…….

Source: www.cameralabs.com

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