Street Photography

Street Photography Tips with Mehrdad Samak-Abedi | Pictureline

What draws you to street photography? And what do you enjoy the most about it?

In retrospect, a documentary about Bruce Gilden was the trigger that got me excited for the genre. Gilden is certainly a photographer who separates street photographers, but his style capturing life on the street is real and gritty. What really impressed me is his loss of distance between himself and his subjects. He is not afraid of being recognized photographing unknown persons, and he is not making a secret of taking a picture.  

One of his statements especially stands out to me:
If you can smell the street by looking at a photo, then you know it ‘s street photography.

The fascinating and challenging aspect of street photography is that a situation or a picture is developing differently than I may had imagined before. I often have a specific image in mind, but while I wait and watch the surroundings, I discover new stories. Quite often it turns out as a so called snapshot, and other times I keep waiting at a spot until the subject walks in. What I also like about street photography (different than perhaps portrait photography) is that you choose your background first and then wait for people to complete your story. It is a total different approach of getting the one shot. I often don’t realize I have some jewels until seeing them on the computer. Street Photography certainly also has something to do with luck. It may happen that a snapshot of an unexpected moment is my photo of the day. To put it like Forrest Gump, street photography is like a box of chocolates for me. You never know what you’re going to get…….

See more pictures on www.pictureline.com

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Street: Fuji X-Pro1 vs Canon 5D MKII | Dade Freeman

On Friday I met up with Julie Edwards in a café, before putting her FujiFilm X-Pro 1 through its paces as we stalked the streets of Worthing. Julie had kindly agreed to share her knowledge, camera and time with me while we did a little street photography to compare our cameras and their abilities. Julie, a working professional photographer and Nikon shooter, reached into her small bag and brought out the Fujifilm X-Pro1. The first thing I noticed was that it has a retro die-cast aluminium alloy body and is clearly aimed at the DSLR user, being the bridge between the fixed lens mirrorless systems and the chunky DSLR world. Could this be the fabled DSLR killer? Julie has only had the camera for about a month, and already she says it will be her “go to” camera. Although it may not be as fast and work as well in low light as her DSLR, she has used it on a shoot and the client couldn’t tell the difference between her usual DSLR images and the ones taken with the X-Pro1. This bodes well and opens up a lot of opportunities. So, with coffee over and done with, it was time to hit the streets, cameras in hand. I popped on my 50mm lens to give me the same focal length as her 35mm (crop factor) although Julie did have the option to go to f/1.4, unlike me. The camera comes with a neck-strap but, much like the Canon EOS-M strap, it is pretty pointless and ends up wrapped around the wrist. :/ ….

See on krysalisphotography.com

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Street photography in Soho and Covent Garden with the
Fuji X-E1 | Al Power

A few weeks ago I went up to London to visit the Photographers gallery and check out the Mass Observation exhibition (excellent – sadly now finished) with my good friend David, and then spent an afternoon introducing him to the fine art of street photography (to which he took to pretty naturally).

tips settings
For the most part I wore my Fuji X-E1 around my wrist using a wrist strap, with my finger on the power switch. Settings were pretty much 1/250th of a second, f4-f8 and auto ISO up to 6400, and manual focused/zone focused so that if I saw something interesting approaching, I could power on, and just raise the camera to my eye and shoot, all within seconds – often without my subject even realising. I used both the 18-55 and the 35 mm, but I really liked being forced to think with my feet within the constraints of the 35mm…….

See on alpower.com

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PHNOM PENH – ONE DAY | Tim Kelsall

Earlier this year, my friend Rupert Abbott asked me if I wanted to mount an exhibition of my photos at Baitong, his restaurant and meeting space in Phnom Penh. I was a bit hesitant at first, because although I quite like my own photos, I don’t necessarily expect anyone else to like them, let alone buy them. However, he put me in touch with Matt Cuenca, an artist who runs the exhibition space at Baitong, and he inspired me to show some of my Phnom Penh street photography. But which shots should I show? I suggested to Matt that I send him a collection of my favourites and that he make a selection around a particular theme. The theme he came back with was ‘A day in the life of Phnom Penh’, one photo for every hour, dawn to dusk…..

The photos were shot with a Fuji X-Pro 1 and Olympus EM5. I wonder if any of you can tell which is which?

See more pictures on www.timkelsallphotography.org

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Walking meditation | Photography by Rinzi Ruiz

For me a huge part of photography and in finding a personal style is in learning how to see. It’s something that’s not easy and takes some time to figure out.  Earlier I was focused on learning how to use the camera and different lenses,  I was focused on learning different processing styles and I was learning how to edit my photos. Through all the practicing I was also learning how to see. I’m constantly in the process of learning how to see and really learning how ‘I’ see. Learning how ‘I’ see is what’s most important to me because it’s how I believe my personal style will come about. It will be my unique take on the world and the things and people who I photograph. Often I will just go out to shoot and just photograph what catches my eye but there are some moments when I will not take a single picture and just watch people. I’ll take some pictures with my eyes and mind to practice, to think about and understand why I noticed something or why I would take a picture of it or what angle and framing I would use to best capture a scene or moment. At times it’s just observing to get inspired to even shoot a person in the environment or a detail that speaks to me. The question I continue to ask myself is “Why?”. Why take this picture? Why am I attracted to certain people and things? What’s my message? Why does it interest me? Even when I go through others photographs I’ll ask this question to myself. Why do I like it? Why did they take the photo? Why that angle? I’ll ask why with regards to possible camera settings and possible focal lengths. This also really helps me to learn more about myself and also the photographer who took the photo. There are other factors in finding my personal style like the cameras I use, the settings I use, the quality of light I use, and many others but I think that learning how “I” see is at the top of the list. I feel that as I continue to learn, experiment and figure this out that my style will continue to evolve and grow but I also feel that it’s such a rewarding experience because it is such a challenge…..

http://www.rinziruizphotography.com/blog/2013/2/art-of-observation

Rinzi Ruiz is a Los Angeles based photographer and artist. Fuji X100, Fuji X-Pro1, Nikon d800e …. Great black & white pictures!


Visit his sites:

http://www.rinziruizphotography.com/
http://streetzen.tumblr.com/

See more pictures on streetzen.tumblr.com

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Streets of Paris | Matt Wilkinson


 
Went to Paris for a long weekend, we had great weather and an amazing time, loved walking the streets with my Fuji X-pro trying to capture a little bit of Paris life.

Shot with the Fuji X-pro 1 with the 35mm 1.4 

See more pictures on www.mattwilkinsonphotography.co.uk

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X-Wow: Initial Shots from the Fujifilm X-Pro1 | Kevin Buchanan

As those who know me personally will know, my digital photographic life has been turned upside-down in recent months by my Fujifilm X100.  This compact, high-quality big-sensor rangefinder-style camera inspired me in ways that no digital camera before was able to do, and completely changed my idea of what the digital side of my workflow should be.  Loving the X100 and wanting to take things to the next step, I have sold off all of my Canon DSLR equipment and have now invested in the X100′s interchangeable-lens big brother, the Fujifilm X-Pro1. I’ve been shooting with the X-Pro1 and the 35mm (equivalent to a 50mm on a full-frame camera) f/1.4 lens now for several days, and have been continually blown away by the photos I’ve been getting from it.  I’ve thrown it into several different situations – portraits, street, concerts, etc. – and have been learning how it behaves and responds.  It’s everything I loved about the X100, taken to a new level……

See more pictures on kevinbuchananphoto.com

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NYC Street Photography with my X-Pro1 | Rodney Boles

Had an amazing few days walking around Manhattan with my Fujifilm X-Pro1 at the end of last week.  Took along my 18-55mm zoom, 35mm f/1.4 lens and an old Nikon 50mm f/1.4D (using an adapter). On some days I also brought along an old medium format Yashicamat 124G TLR to shoot some film, but haven’t developed it yet. This was my 3rd visit in the last four years, and the first using a smaller mirrorless camera instead of a big, bulky, heavy, conspicuous DSLR. What a difference! The Fuji doesn’t draw much attention (except from other photographers, who want to ask questions!), making it perfect to blend in on the streets. I could (and did) walk the streets all day without even noticing the gear I was carrying. For outdoor walking around, I would normally set my camera around f/8 1/250th and auto-ISO and zone focus about the distance people would be as I’d pass them by. Camera would be mounted around my neck with the zoom at 18mm, with my finger on the shutter. If I saw something/someone interesting, I’d take a photograph. Didn’t always get the shot, but my hit rate was certainly better than if I had tried to bring the camera to my eye and composed a quick shot…….

See more pictures on rodneyboles.com

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The Street Collective Vol. 1 for Free on PhotoWhoa | Freddy Martinez

This is the Street Collective.

This is work you must learn from. A collection of the world’s best street, documentary, and fine art photographers. It is energetic. Gritty. In your face and brutally honest. It is a genre of photography not for the faint of heart. Or the unsure. These are images that look for that decisive moment in the chaos. In a lot of ways street photography is one of the most accessible genres to shoot. That’s because there’s no set path, or widely accepted standard. Yet there are some photographers who never stop searching for that perfect moment…..

From our reader Freddy:

We’ve just spent months creating a free e-book with insights from several extremely talented street/doc/fine art photographers. We entitled it “The Street Collective.”
 
The Street Collective was the result of many hours interviewing top photographers such as Bryan Formhals (of LPV Magazine) and World Press Award winner Laura Pannack about their process and how they achieve their unique looks. We did this to help our audience learn what it takes to make great street photography. It’s completely free, and we’re trying to get the word out about this.
 
You can see the free e-book here and download your own copy:
https://www.photowhoa.com/street
 
You could also check out our interviews on our blog:

See on www.photowhoa.com

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Havana – Cuba and The Impending Winds of Change | Adriah Seah

When one encounters a new place for the first time, the barrage of new information and stimulus on the brain usually causes it go scrambling to make sense of the situation by comparing it with a mental list of other known destinations. Such was the case for me with Havana, Cuba. As the scenery flashed by outside the window of the taxi from the airport, some of it seemed strangely familiar, whether it resembled a mishmash of other tropical islands I’ve seen before or if it was just the countless images of Cuba portrayed in books and films that I’ve watched, I cannot say for certain. There are no shortages of stereotypes for Cuba, old American cars, grand buildings that have seen a better era, the weathered grandma puffing away on a great big cigar … yet what the photos often fail to convey is the sense of celebration about the place, a celebration of life itself, of which is often lived out in the streets. Everywhere you go, there’s always the sound of live music around the corner, and everyone seems to be out on the streets, or hanging out of their balconies, trading gossip with neighbours, and just sat in front of their doorways, watching life unfold on the streets. Apart from the slightly annoying habit of taxi touts and jineteros (hustlers trying to sell us everything from cigars, great restaurants to girls, whilst simultaneously attempting to guess our nationality/ethnicity)…..

See more pictures on handcarryonly.com

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