Travel Photography

Driving around Europe | Karim Haddad

It’s hard to believe that I flew back to Miami from Europe more than two months ago. It was after a relatively short roadtrip that took us to three different countries – Holland, Belgium and Germany. If I didn’t have to wait three days for my luggage to arrive from Libya, we probably would have gotten to France as well. I flew into Amsterdam (via Istanbul) and I had to take a train to Leiden. I was there to visit an old friend of mine who is like a brother. Luckily, it wasn’t too far and well worth the trip. I needed to buy clothes and a toothbrush, but at least I had my camera with me and a few lenses……

Source: blog.karimhaddad.com

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Fuji in Europe – Street photography in Nuremberg | Maciek Sokulski

The streets in Europe are always full of people.  I guess mostly because they are designed for walking, with wide sidewalks, and easy access to shops and restaurants.  Unlike the city of Edmonton for example, and I would imagine most North American cities.  I can walk my neighborhood, and see maybe 1 or 2 people every couple of hours.  It’s silly.  So naturally Europe lends itself to street photography a lot more than North America.  It’s a lot easier to sit down in an outdoor cafe, and just point the camera at something interesting.  This was exactly what happened. Walked around the streets of Nuremberg, doing a bit of last minute shopping, and sat down at the cafe, had some cappuccino, and just pointed the camera.  Simple easy and quite rewarding.  No wonder, that a very cool street photographer Valerie Jardin offers street photography workshops in Europe, among other interesting places…….

Source: www.miksmedia.net

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Street Photography Course in Budapest and a Fuji X Pro 1 | Keith Moss

This is my 4th day designing a street photography course in Budapest, my companion, for this trip a Fuji X-Pro 1 Its another searingly hot day with very little breeze, it’s in the mid 30s with a high humidity, quite unpleasant for this chap from England, nevertheless I want to explore  the Jewish Quarter. Budapest has the largest Jewish community in Central Europe so I head  there to check it out. My first port of call is the Great Synagogue, a magnificent looking building from the outside and  literature tells me that it is one of the largest synagogue in Europe. As a street photographer  I wouldn’t normally pay to enter a tourist attraction but this is more than that,  I wanted to find out about the history.  It costs 2800 Hufs to enter which is about £8 at the current exchange rate. I have to say it is worth it. It’s stunning inside, almost theatre-esk with its balconies and what look like private boxes that seem to go all around, it beautiful and ornate. You are also allowed to take photographs as long as you don’t use flash. On entering all ladies have to cover their shoulders and the men must wear a Kippah which are provided. Part of the entrance fee allows you to go to the Jewish museum which has important pieces of art from Hungary and Eastern Europe. Part of the museum has quite shocking images of the persecution of Jews suffered during the war……..

Source: streetphotographycourses.co.uk

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Night Street Photography in Budapest With a Fuji X-Pro 1 | Keith Moss

Budapest comes alive at night.. Its early June and its starts to get dusk around 9pm, I’m using my Fuji X-Pro 1 tonight and it’s a great opportunity to capture the iconic Chain Bridge, illuminated with my Fujinon XF 18mm F2 R lens. Speaking to a local I was told all of the bridges are lit up at 9pm, so having checked out the location earlier I knew exactly where I wanted to capture the bridge from which was from the Buda side of the city and slightly downstream. I always travel light for street photography which means I never take a tripod. Sometimes I do regret this as it does hinder me when capturing movement. But I much prefer nowadays to hand hold so if I am shooting film I always have a couple of rolls of Ilford 3200asa which allows me to walk the streets and hand hold my camera in most situations, but tonight I am shooting with a digital camera. I applied rule number one in the Keith Moss night street photography rulebook and that is to underexpose by one stop. Using the Fuji X-Pro1 which is excellent at high ISO, I set it to 1600 ISO. I used an 18mm F2 Fuji lens which I have to say is excellent, exposure was 60th of a second and I shot at F2.8.. perfect…….

Source: streetphotographycourses.co.uk

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Venice | Sam Burton

We were lucky enough to spend a long weekend in Venice recently. This was a joint celebration for my mums 60th Birthday and my Aunt taking part in the annual Vogalonga boat race. We have wanted to go to Venice for a long time and were not disappointed. Arriving in Venice is like arriving on a film set. It is like no where else in the world I have been. Its an incredibly beautiful city with lots of culture and amazing architecture. We were treated to four days of perfect weather with blue skies and bright sunshine. Venice is the perfect place just to wonder and get lost. Exploring the alleyways and weaving around the canals is a lot of fun. I took my trusty Xpro1 along to keep the weight down. There were so many incredible sights I didn’t know where to point my camera, it really is one of the most photogenic cities I have visited. Here is a selection of my favourite shots from our trip. All taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 with XF 35mm & XF 18mm lenses and edited with VSCO Film……

See on samburtonphoto.com

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On Traveling With Your Camera | David Hobby

Here’s the problem with most travel photography books: they are to some degree disingenuous. They play on the idea that you’d love to be a full-time travel shooter, and build on that desire to point you in a lot of inappropriate directions. I mean, it’s cool to know how to shoot for a cover, or how to get in touch with picture buyers for travel mags or how to (try to) sell your work as travel stock. But the reality is that only a very small percentage of people who try will actually make it as travel photographers. Which is why the first thing I did with this new video series was to throw out that assumption. Here’s what I went with instead. Travel is a wonderful thing. But it is also a time-compressed, experience-rich period in when the balance between photography and the other parts of your life can be a bit stressed. Most of the time when traveling you are simultaneously serving several masters. You are an individual, experiencing personal growth as a traveler. You are a spouse. You are a parent. And you are a photographer………

See on strobist.blogspot.de

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The Palouse – A Visual Journey with the Fuji X-Series – Part 2 |
Olaf Sztaba

What a great trip it was! In our previous blog entry we shared the first photos from our escapade into the stunning Palouse region of southeastern Washington. Thank you for all your kind comments, shared stories and questions. The most appealing feature of the region is, ironically, the lack of popular spots such as Half Dome in Yosemite or Antelope Canyon in Arizona. The Palouse is for each individual to unravel and photograph. Every corner, every dirt road hides a visual gem to discover and some of them are only visible to you. While we made some preparations before the visit, such as studying excellent maps of Palouse by Teri Lou Danzler (you can get them here), the majority of our images came from exploring small rural dirt roads. The abundance of patterns and stunning visuals offer huge opportunities but you need concentration and strong composition skills. On the topic of composition, the process of elimination is especially important when photographing Palouse…….

See on olafphotoblog.com

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Wonderful Copenhagen | Rory Prior

This piece continues my photographic journey around Copenhagen. You can see part 1 by clicking here. Before delving into more photos, let me say a bit about the lenses I took with me. After some deliberation I decided upon the 18, 27 and 60mm primes. That meant leaving the fisheye, 50-230 and my old manual focus optics at home. I think overall the trio I picked out covered 95% of the shooting situations I found myself in. They are all capable performers, their light weight and in particular the small size of the 18 and 27 make them great for travel. You can just put them into a messenger bag or even a coat pocket and blend into the crowd. I’ve got a great LowerPro backpack that I used to cart my Nikon gear around in, but it’s not something I want weighing on my shoulders for hours, especially when walking around all day. The great thing about the Fuji system for travel photography is that it’s so compact and lightweight compared to even a small DSLR setup – crucially while still producing top notch results. It’s taken awhile for mirrorless cameras to reach this point, but now I know there’s no going back…..

See on lightpriority.net

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NY with Fuji X Pro1 | Pieter Vermeulen

After years of shooting with my Canon 5D and other big camera’s I bought a Leica M8.2 a little over a year ago along with two nice Elmarit lenses. In the end, it wasn’t for me. I loved shooting with and getting that Leica feeling, but the ISO performances were so bad that I could not justify it. Thought of buying a M9 instead, but even for the extra money I could not just do it. I also bought the Fuji X100S when it came out and loved it. I did sell it after 2 months because the fixed focal length wasn’t for me. So I sold everything and bought the Fuji X Pro 1 with the 18mm 2.0 and the 35mm 1.4. Fell in love with it. Wasn’t the Leica M but it was what I was looking for. So when I went to New York for the first time in my life (actually flying for the first time in my life after being scared of flying my entire life) I brought the X Pro. One day… I will go back to Leica… but for now… the Fuji helped in capturing the people of New York. Just wanted to share! …….

See on www.stevehuffphoto.com

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The Monks of Myanmar | Ross Kennedy

Out of the morning mist they appear: serious, silent, with a purposeful stride, their bare feet thump the road, completely indifferent to the foreigner with the camera. “Mingalaba!” I try the traditional Burmese greeting, unsure if it will be acknowledged here amongst the Shan. A young Novice flashes me the briefest of smiles and a nod, traditional politeness overcoming Buddhist detachment. At a crossroads the long, snaking line dissolves and they are gone all too quickly. I sit down at the roadside and watch them dart off in a hundred different directions. Myanmar has gifted me another precious little nugget on a trip filled with very special moments……..

See on blog.rosskennedyimages.com

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