Travel Photography

Venice | Sam Burton

We were lucky enough to spend a long weekend in Venice recently. This was a joint celebration for my mums 60th Birthday and my Aunt taking part in the annual Vogalonga boat race. We have wanted to go to Venice for a long time and were not disappointed. Arriving in Venice is like arriving on a film set. It is like no where else in the world I have been. Its an incredibly beautiful city with lots of culture and amazing architecture. We were treated to four days of perfect weather with blue skies and bright sunshine. Venice is the perfect place just to wonder and get lost. Exploring the alleyways and weaving around the canals is a lot of fun. I took my trusty Xpro1 along to keep the weight down. There were so many incredible sights I didn’t know where to point my camera, it really is one of the most photogenic cities I have visited. Here is a selection of my favourite shots from our trip. All taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 with XF 35mm & XF 18mm lenses and edited with VSCO Film……

See on samburtonphoto.com

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On Traveling With Your Camera | David Hobby

Here’s the problem with most travel photography books: they are to some degree disingenuous. They play on the idea that you’d love to be a full-time travel shooter, and build on that desire to point you in a lot of inappropriate directions. I mean, it’s cool to know how to shoot for a cover, or how to get in touch with picture buyers for travel mags or how to (try to) sell your work as travel stock. But the reality is that only a very small percentage of people who try will actually make it as travel photographers. Which is why the first thing I did with this new video series was to throw out that assumption. Here’s what I went with instead. Travel is a wonderful thing. But it is also a time-compressed, experience-rich period in when the balance between photography and the other parts of your life can be a bit stressed. Most of the time when traveling you are simultaneously serving several masters. You are an individual, experiencing personal growth as a traveler. You are a spouse. You are a parent. And you are a photographer………

See on strobist.blogspot.de

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The Palouse – A Visual Journey with the Fuji X-Series – Part 2 |
Olaf Sztaba

What a great trip it was! In our previous blog entry we shared the first photos from our escapade into the stunning Palouse region of southeastern Washington. Thank you for all your kind comments, shared stories and questions. The most appealing feature of the region is, ironically, the lack of popular spots such as Half Dome in Yosemite or Antelope Canyon in Arizona. The Palouse is for each individual to unravel and photograph. Every corner, every dirt road hides a visual gem to discover and some of them are only visible to you. While we made some preparations before the visit, such as studying excellent maps of Palouse by Teri Lou Danzler (you can get them here), the majority of our images came from exploring small rural dirt roads. The abundance of patterns and stunning visuals offer huge opportunities but you need concentration and strong composition skills. On the topic of composition, the process of elimination is especially important when photographing Palouse…….

See on olafphotoblog.com

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Wonderful Copenhagen | Rory Prior

This piece continues my photographic journey around Copenhagen. You can see part 1 by clicking here. Before delving into more photos, let me say a bit about the lenses I took with me. After some deliberation I decided upon the 18, 27 and 60mm primes. That meant leaving the fisheye, 50-230 and my old manual focus optics at home. I think overall the trio I picked out covered 95% of the shooting situations I found myself in. They are all capable performers, their light weight and in particular the small size of the 18 and 27 make them great for travel. You can just put them into a messenger bag or even a coat pocket and blend into the crowd. I’ve got a great LowerPro backpack that I used to cart my Nikon gear around in, but it’s not something I want weighing on my shoulders for hours, especially when walking around all day. The great thing about the Fuji system for travel photography is that it’s so compact and lightweight compared to even a small DSLR setup – crucially while still producing top notch results. It’s taken awhile for mirrorless cameras to reach this point, but now I know there’s no going back…..

See on lightpriority.net

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NY with Fuji X Pro1 | Pieter Vermeulen

After years of shooting with my Canon 5D and other big camera’s I bought a Leica M8.2 a little over a year ago along with two nice Elmarit lenses. In the end, it wasn’t for me. I loved shooting with and getting that Leica feeling, but the ISO performances were so bad that I could not justify it. Thought of buying a M9 instead, but even for the extra money I could not just do it. I also bought the Fuji X100S when it came out and loved it. I did sell it after 2 months because the fixed focal length wasn’t for me. So I sold everything and bought the Fuji X Pro 1 with the 18mm 2.0 and the 35mm 1.4. Fell in love with it. Wasn’t the Leica M but it was what I was looking for. So when I went to New York for the first time in my life (actually flying for the first time in my life after being scared of flying my entire life) I brought the X Pro. One day… I will go back to Leica… but for now… the Fuji helped in capturing the people of New York. Just wanted to share! …….

See on www.stevehuffphoto.com

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The Monks of Myanmar | Ross Kennedy

Out of the morning mist they appear: serious, silent, with a purposeful stride, their bare feet thump the road, completely indifferent to the foreigner with the camera. “Mingalaba!” I try the traditional Burmese greeting, unsure if it will be acknowledged here amongst the Shan. A young Novice flashes me the briefest of smiles and a nod, traditional politeness overcoming Buddhist detachment. At a crossroads the long, snaking line dissolves and they are gone all too quickly. I sit down at the roadside and watch them dart off in a hundred different directions. Myanmar has gifted me another precious little nugget on a trip filled with very special moments……..

See on blog.rosskennedyimages.com

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The Palouse – A Visual Journey with the Fuji X-Series | Olaf Sztaba

Each world religion has a place of very special importance where millions of the faithful make their pilgrimage. Similarly, there is a place that every photographer should visit. It is a land like no other. The unconscious beauty of the land captivated us. The abundance of shapes, patterns and colours produces dream-like visuals, which might overwhelm your senses at first. However, if you cut yourself off from the noise of your everyday life, turn off your cellphone, disconnect from the Internet and let your senses wander, you will find yourself in awe. Rolling yellow fields against the blue sky, whirling patterns of cut hay and huge expanses of sand dune-like hills are all a feast for the eyes. The Palouse is an agricultural region in southeastern Washington, which produces mostly wheat and legumes. We couldn’t find the origin of the name “Palouse.” Some sources claim that the name comes from the Palus tribe, only later converted to Pelouse by the French-Canadian fur traders, which means “land with short thick grass.” Later the name was changed to the current Palouse……..

See on olafphotoblog.com

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Sailing | Little Big Traveling Camera

I was the first one who walked upstairs and enjoyed the beautiful scenery. The view was fantastic but what I loved even more was the have a couple of quiet and peaceful minutes on the upper deck of our boat. This is my third trip to Asia. I can remember how I felt before the first one. I was nervous because of the high population density of the places I will see. I go there for business so the only places I usually see are the big cities like Hanoi, Saigon ( HCMC ), Bangkok, Manila or Jakarta. These are all mega cities with more inhabitants than the small country where I was born and live. I lived in Vienna for almost 20 years but Vienna is a city of just 1.7 million, if you add its surroundings it´s 2.5. In the list of the biggest 200 metropolitan areas Vienna ranks 179. In this list Jakarta is second with almost 30 million. Manila made it in the Top10 too. There are a couple of other lists on the internet and there is no standard to tell what a city is and to determine the number of its inhabitants. But it doesn’t matter. These cities are really big and can be overwhelming…..

See on www.littlebigtravelingcamera.com

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Wales and the X Pro | Stacy Guiney

So myself and good buddy James Watson hit the good country of Wales for a long over due road trip. Heading over to the Elan Valley an estate which forms home to number of Dams and reservoirs which service the city of Birmingham and the West Midlands. Wales os a special place indeed, everything is BIG sky, mountains, lakes and then the engineering feats of the dams the plan, just too have fun escape the mids and try some stuff out so some long exposure was going to go down with a 10 stop filter the xpro some glass and some sweets……

See on www.suberashi.co.uk

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Vancouver in B&W | Olaf Sztaba

Last weekend we left home at 4:30 AM to capture Vancouver at its best. The hourly weather forecast was right and we encountered very contrasty weather conditions with stunningly rich skies and beautiful light. All we had to worry about was composition. It is something we spend a lot of time working on in the field. This is especially challenging in an urban environment when you have so many elements competing for the spot inside your frame. Pre-visualization, positioning of the camera and a rigorous elimination process are essential. In this post we would like to share with you B&W images shot with the Fuji X-T1 coupled with XF 14mm F2.8 & 56mm F1.2 lenses. We also worked with our Fuji X100S……

See on olafphotoblog.com

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