XF 18-135mm

Fujifilm XF 18-135 3.5 ~ 5.6 OIS WR Lens Under a Tuscan Sun Review |
David Brommer

The Tuscan summer vacation always leads me to a mini photo project using specific gear. In the past years the cameras have been diverse such as the Instant Italy summer, using only Fujifilm Instax cameras. Other times I had the pleasure of weeks resorting only to Deardorrfs and Hassalblads, Nikon rangefinder and toy cameras and of course the summer of water color not using a camera at all. This year since a Tuscan darkroom is available after setting one up last year, I knew I’d grab a film camera and using periscope (the social media livecast software), it was decided that the Zeiss Icon 535 medium format would be employed. But I did want a digital, and after the past year of using the cream of Sony’s crop of cameras I was distraught on what to use……

Source: suspectphotography.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

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Xtend your Fuji system: All about that Hood | Rene Delbar

Let’s be honest: next to the ease-of-use of the Fujifilm X cameras, the advantages of their sensor, the performance of the XF glass and the resulting image quality, many X-shooters just love the retro design and handling of the bodies. Right from the start, with the original X100, we got a compact tool to completely enjoy taking pictures. If you’re old enough to have started photography with roll film or 35mm cassettes: just add “again” at the end. In order to augment the “old days” experience, we’ve been adding leather carrying and wrist straps, half cases, thumb grips, soft releases, old-fashioned cable releases… In the end though, you can’t but ask yourself: Why didn’t Fujifilm bring us sexier lens hoods? It started rather well actually. The X100’s fixed 23mm lens comes with a nice metal vented release. That comes handy when using the optical viewfinder, as less of the field of view is obstructed (as long as the openings are well aligned, hence the bayonet mount)……

Source: fujixtras.blogspot.fr


Fujinon XF Lenses

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Zoom Lenses Vs. Prime Lenses | Sebastian Boatca

Many people asked me one of the oldest questions in Modern Era Photography : is it better to shoot with primes or with zooms? Here are my thoughts about this topic and I remember I have asked this question myself many times. I had strong debates with friends and this topic invited me to search the web, looking for a clear answer. I needed the expertise of professionals, to see what are the pros and cons when working on site with different type of lenses. After I have slowly built my limited experience as a photographer (especially Landscape and Travel), I have felt on my own skin the pros and cons of using both prime and zoom lenses. Of course I have started with a kit lens, my first zoom being EF-S 17-85mm IS USM on a Canon 60D and my first prime was the famous EF 50mm F1.8 II plastic-fantastic lens. As a beginner, I loved the Canon EF zoom more, but the IQ from the nifty-fifty was way better……

Source: www.sebastianboatca.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF10-24mm F4.0

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Choosing between the Fuji 16-55mm f/2.8, 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6,
and 18-55mm f/2.8-4 | Tom Grill

In my latest hands-on review of the Fuji 16-55mm f/2.8 I mentioned that with this lens Fuji expands its lens system with a redundancy that covers more that one solution to the same optical coverage. For the consumer, this means more choice within the various focal length categories allowing photographers to tailor their lens choices to the specific way they use their equipment. A serious landscape photographer has very different equipment needs than a still life or lifestyle photographer, just as a photographer using the equipment casually has a different criteria than a pro who relies on it to make a living. I have received a number of emails from readers asking which of the three lenses I would recommend based upon specific criteria. So I decided to dedicate a blog post to the topic, and here it is. Here is one of the questions I received recently:

„I was thinking of buying the Fuji 18-135 as a convenient lens to used round the salt mashes, mudflats and coastal areas where I live. However the 16-55 seems to be having rave reviews, including your just published  review……..

Source: aboutphotography-tomgrill.blogspot.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

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16-55mm f/2.8 vs. 18-55mm f/2.8-4 vs. 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 | Fuji vs. Fuji

The pro standard zoom has long been a staple in almost every pro photographer’s bag. They are intended to be workhorses that can take anything we can throw at them. Low light, inclement weather, fast-moving subjects, you name it. At long last, Fuji’s standard f/2.8 zoom is available, which, along with the 50-140mm f/2.8 fills the two biggest gaps in their lens lineup. We could achieve these focal lengths before, but never with a constant aperture, and outside of 18mm, never at a maximum aperture of f/2.8. This piece will explore in-depth what you get for your extra money, aside from more size and weight…….

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8

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18-135mm vs. 50-140mm vs. 55-200mm | Fuji vs. Fuji

With the advent of the 50-140mm f/2.8, Fuji X-Series owners now have 3 ways of reaching beyond 200mm in 35mm equivalence. The first two releases—Fuji’s FUJINON XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS and FUJINON XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS WR—are both geared more towards the casual shooter. Fuji’s latest telephoto zoom offering—complete with premium-looking Red XF Zoom Badge—is the 50-140mm f/2.8, and has a significantly more “pro” feel to it. As we’ll see, this is a common theme for these three lenses, and should serve as an easy way for readers to decide which lens is best for them……

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

White Out: A Wintery Weekend in the Peaks | Verity E. Milligan

I’m one of those unfortunate people who have a birthday in January. For years I’ve cursed this as everyone is still hungover from Christmas, and frankly don’t want to be concerned with such frivolity. Being a photographer has slowly changed my opinion of January, and winter as a whole. Instead of seeing endless days of cold weather, I see limitless opportunities for frosty landscapes and those cool, blue tones as the sun hangs forever low in the sky. I’ve always been in love with the spring and autumn, but it’s taken a while to fall for winter. My dear wife-to-be Rachel treated me to a weekend in the Peak District at the end of January, nestled in the heart of the white peaks, down near my childhood haunts of Dovedale. When we left, there was little snow in Birmingham, but as we drove closer, the snow appeared. The night before we arrived, 6 inches had fallen and lay like a fresh blanket over the landscape, with snow still falling, rushing towards the windscreen in the dark, looking like we’d entered warp speed along the winding country roads…….

Source: www.veritymilliganphotography.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Review: Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR Lens (X Mount) | Kevin Lee

Over the last few years Fujifilm has been filling out its X-series lens line up with fast primes. However, aside from a surprisingly good XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 kit lens, zoom lenses have been rather ignored until now. 2014 has been the year of the Fujifilm zoom lens between the Fujifilm XF 10-24mm f4 plus two of the X-series’ first telephoto zoom lenses, the XF 55-200mm f3.5-4.8 and XF 50-140mm f2.8. Now the Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens caps off the year as an extremely flexible superzoom lens with weather sealing to boot. It has the potential to be a great all-round lens for everyday shooting, traveling, and event photography. However, as with all superzoom lenses I’m going to examine whether the Fujifilm 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 has sacrificed any image quality for flexibility……

Source: www.thephoblographer.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

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Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 review | Matthew Maddock

I personally shoot with the amazing Fujinon prime lenses for the vast majority of the time, but the XF18-135 WR did strike me as the perfect lens for the travel photographer and so I was interested in how it would perform.  It seems like an ideal lens for use in environments in which you don’t want to be changing lenses, and Fujifilm UK were kind enough to recently send me a sample of the Fujifilm XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 lens to review and generally have a play with!  I am not paid by Fujifilm in any way to write anything about their gear, or influenced at all to say good things! This isn’t going to be one of my huge write-ups as I had a fairly limited time with the lens, and as I said, I’m mainly a prime shooter these days, but I got out and about with it a few times, both in the countryside and in the city.  I’ll post up a gallery of full resolution images at the bottom of the page so you can judge for yourself how the lens performs! The XF 18-135 is the 35mm equivalent of 27-200mm (or thereabouts) which is a good long range for someone if they want to go out with one camera and one lens.  It makes the ideal range for travelling and combined with the X-T1 you have a full weather resistant system.  The advantage of that long range in is that in an environment where you need that resistance, you never have to remove the lens from the body, therefore protecting the internals of the camera……..

Source: photomadd.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F2.8

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Fuji XF18-135 F3.5-5.6 R OIS WR lens review (Part 1) | Mike Evans

Opening the box of a new Fujinon lens is an adventure. Every lens has a different set of bells and whistles and, unless you are already familiar with the range you are likely to in for a surprise. From the minimal 27mm pancake to the more complicated 14mm and 23mm lenses with their push-pull switchover from manual to auto focus, these optics demand an open mind. Sometimes, I imagine that the boffins at Fujinon work in hermetically sealed bubbles. Apart from the trademark shiny black-metal surface, their lenses are individualist and, dare I say, often a little eccentric. Leica M lenses, in direct contrast, all have the same basic layout. Everything is in its place, just where the gods intended. Focus ring? Aperture? They are precisely where you left them last time you picked up any M lens……..

Source: macfilos.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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