XF 23mm

Why you need a 35mm lens! | Sven Schroeter

Lens choices are incredibly personal, and when buying a prime lens (a fixed focal length lens), there is a lot to consider before locking in your choice. I was faced with this troubling decision when buying the Leica. I had to decide which lens to indulge in, in order to maintain versatility on the street, without limiting my options for travel or the great outdoors. You can probably tell from the title of the post, I decided to go with the 35mm focal length. I have been using this equivalent focal length on the Fujifilm X100T (fixed lens camera) and the XT1/XPRO1/XPRO2 for a long time. It allows you to walk into any situation and get right to work. For most, it is a lens which you work up to using. It is a little on the wide side for distortion free portraits, but you can make it work if you are careful.  And when prowling the streets for unique individuals and candid moments you have to get intimate with your subject to fill the frame, your subject will definitely knowledge your presence…….

Source: Why you need a 35mm lens! — BOKEH – MONSTER

Is That Lens Sharp In The Corners? No? Are You Sure? | Dennis A. Mook

Often I hear photographers and reviewers remarking that a certain lens is not sharp in the corners. But is it really not sharp?  Or maybe what you are seeing is the result of a curved field lens being tested against a flat subject.  I wrote about curved field lenses versus flat field lenses with some illustrations on the difference here..  If you are interested, please follow the link and read it.Here is a practical example of what I mean.  The image above was made using the highly touted Fujifilm 23mm f/1.4 XF lens.  The lens is very sharp, even wide open and contains an aspherical element.  I used it to demonstrate that, looking at the image above, one may wrongly conclude that the lens is not sharp in the corners……

Source: www.thewanderinglensman.com

72 Hours in Tokyo with Fuji X-T1 and 23mm 1.4 | Jeff Seltzer

Only three days in any major city is not enough – but that’s especially true for Tokyo. This city has always been on my „bucket list“ so I was fortunate that circumstances brought me here, if only for a short time. I limited my gear to my Fuji X-T1 and probably my favorite lens,the excellent Fujifilm XF 23mm f/1.4 R, which is perfect for travel. Tokyo is such an interesting place, it’s almost overwhelming – there was always something interesting to catch my eye. The X-T1, as always, proved to be a worthy camera in some challenging conditions. I will always remember Tokyo as the city I first used my Pano mode! Lol. Here are some of my favorite shots……..

Source: jeffseltzerphotography.com

Fuji XM-FL vs XF 23mm: The most fun you can have with your lenses on | Bill Palmer

Last year Fuji brought out a bit of an oddity, a body cap lens. The XM-FL is only available in Japan as at time of writing. In order to get hold of mine I had to resort to eBay and part with seventy-five quid and get it shipped halfway around the world. Two weeks after pressing the button it arrived; possibly the lightest lens-containing parcel I have ever received. In the box you get the XM-FL and… well that’s about it. The instruction sheet is in Japanese (naturally) but a bit of diligent Googling led me to this excellent illustrated run-down on Petapixel. Fuji describes the XM-FL (according to Google Translate) as a „filter lens“. In reality it is either a toy lens or a very thick and simultaneously quite clever body cap, depending upon your point of view. It’s an all-plastic construction affair with a turret arrangement that changes the function of the unit as you twiddle a dial on the side. That dial has notches so that you can work out which setting is which…….

Source: macfilos.com

Fujinon XF23mm f1.4 | James Brokensha

Fuji users have been spoilt of the past few years with release after release of high quality glass. The lens line up is pretty much complete now covering all the classic short, normal and mid tele focal lengths a photographer could need. The lens choice is pretty straight forward for most users, need a 85mm equivalent ?….get the 56mm 1.2, need a macro….. get the 60mm 2.4, need a 70 -200 equivalent? get the 50 -140  2.8…and so on. One decision is not quite so simple though. If you need a 35mm equivalent, do you get the Fujinon 23mm 1.4 or an X100S/T? The decision is not a easy one. You can purchase the prime lens with its nice a bright f1.4 aperture or go for the X100S/T with its fixed, not so bright and not so sharp f2 lens. If you shop around carefully you can pick either up for a very similar price and I went through the very same dilemma. I wanted a 35mm for street and weddings. I weighed up the pro’s and cons and chose the X100s…….

Source: www.jamesbrokenshaphotography.co.uk

Using the X-T10 and the XF23mm f/1.4 on the Ryukyu Islands | Pierre Aden

A couple of months ago I looked at my photography gear and saw three cameras with 9 lenses, all of them for Micro Four Thirds. I did a good job closing every possible gap regarding focal length and aperture to be prepared for every possible photography challenge on earth. But here is the thing: I had way to many options and thought more about the best gear for a photo while looking at a scene and making photos became more work than fun. And even though I had all these lenses I STILL missed something many people call the full frame look. For me this special look that some people see and some don’t is the possibility to seperate your subject from the background with wide angle lenses like a 35mm equivalent……….

Source: fujilove.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 23mm F1.4

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Willem Jonkers Brings Awe Shooting Photos Of Streets With An
8mm Ultra Wide Lens | 121Clicks

Street Photography at an extreme crazy super wide angle, this is Willem Jonkers for us. In this interview he opens up about how he started looking wider with street photography and what makes it so much engaging and passionate hobby. Willem says that he first started with 23mm before settling with this 8mm and the results are just mind-blowing. I can tell you that shooting wide in street photography is not an easy game and with people inside your frame makes it much tougher. But here Willam Jonkers seems to make crafted his art and thoroughly enjoys his game. Take a look for yourself and get inspired……

Source: 121clicks.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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Review | Fuji’s XF 23mm f/1.4. With A 35mm Full Frame FOV,
Is It A Rival For The X100S? | Photography Statistics

One of the things you’ve got to love about Fuji is the company’s ambition, and the gamble it’s been taking on the X-Series. Not only have they been putting out a veritable full bar of lenses compared to say, Sony’s appertif for its A7, but the quality of said lenses is so high. Management could’ve taken guidance solely from the perspective of a P&L sheet and decided they wanted to provide many options on the cheap by creating inexpensive lenses, but instead have gone for the throat of quality. You can almost tell just by looking at them, but once you pick them up, you know. The XF 23mm f/1.4 fits this mold, and is already a staple in their growing list of gorgeous primes.

Source: photographystatistics.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 23mm F1.4

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

West – The Red Centre of Australia . Part 2 | Noah Stammbach

I’ve heard and read about the outback being empty, with not much to see and not worth the travel. We Aussies prefer to live on the coast, leaving the vast interior of Australia as no-man’s land. I yearned to explore this expanse; to be alone in the barren plains and to feel the red spirit of Australia. It was difficult to find people keen for such a huge trip. The first time I met Johnny we talked about ferns and grasses (he’s a landscape architect) which happened to lead to the topic of the outback. We then recruited Koentadi (of @koentadyy) who was ready for his first Aussie roadtrip. Planning began in secret. We wanted to be the first to venture inland; far away from the typical destinations of the NSW coast. Some moments from this trip took me to the edge between calm and panic, but there’s always an unquestionable solace to be found in the middle of nowhere. Click here for part 1 of the trip, a story about the staggering variety of landscapes that unfolds in layers from Sydney to the outback……

Source: www.noahstammbach.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Xtend your Fuji system: All about that Hood | Rene Delbar

Let’s be honest: next to the ease-of-use of the Fujifilm X cameras, the advantages of their sensor, the performance of the XF glass and the resulting image quality, many X-shooters just love the retro design and handling of the bodies. Right from the start, with the original X100, we got a compact tool to completely enjoy taking pictures. If you’re old enough to have started photography with roll film or 35mm cassettes: just add “again” at the end. In order to augment the “old days” experience, we’ve been adding leather carrying and wrist straps, half cases, thumb grips, soft releases, old-fashioned cable releases… In the end though, you can’t but ask yourself: Why didn’t Fujifilm bring us sexier lens hoods? It started rather well actually. The X100’s fixed 23mm lens comes with a nice metal vented release. That comes handy when using the optical viewfinder, as less of the field of view is obstructed (as long as the openings are well aligned, hence the bayonet mount)……

Source: fujixtras.blogspot.fr


Fujinon XF Lenses

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