XF 56mm APD

DPReview Gear of the Year: Fujinon 56mm F1.2R APD |
Richard Butler

My Gear of the Year isn’t a product launched in 2015. Nor is it necessarily the absolute best option available. However, it is the product that I’ve grabbed whenever I wasn’t committed to something else we’ve been testing, and it’s a product I’ve really enjoyed.

What I love

  • Classic portrait focal length 85mm equivalent field-of-view
  • Bright maximum aperture for shallow depth-of-field or low light work
  • Apodization filter to ensure smoother bokeh
  • Well built solid-feeling without being too heavy

I’ve always liked the idea of classic 85-135mm equivalent portrait lenses but they’ve tended to be somewhat thin on the ground for the APS-C cameras I seem to end up testing. So I’m delighted to see Fujifilm go the extra mile and create a fast 85mm equivalent……..

Source: www.dpreview.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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Fujifilm & the ‚Red Label‘ lenses | Dave Kai-Piper

Over the last few years I have had the wonderful opportunity to build up a great relationship with the ‘Green’ team and I am very proud to be an ‘X-Photographer‘. During the time I have been shooting with the Fuji System there have been a number of updates and developments and just as another big firmware update arrives we look at the current line up of lenses to see where we are as the ‘glass’ stands. When the system was first announced , I started shooting with three main lenses, these were the 60mm, 35mm, and the 18mm. All fantastic things and still wonderful items to have, but, in 2015 my Peli case contains a few other slightly more exciting additions. The 60mm, 35mm and 18 all have something in common. They are small, light and built to be simple. Hard wearing and basic could be another way to put it. This is not saying they are not good, on the contrary, these are utterly wonderful lenses, but they are lacking in a few things which Fuji have addressed with the newer generation of lenses such as the 56mm APD…….

Source: ideasandimages.co.uk
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

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Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD lens | Photo Review

The XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD lens is a follow-up to the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R, which was announced in early January 2014. The difference between the new lens (which was announced nine months later) is the apodisation (APD) filter, which is used to smooth away bokeh outlines when wide apertures are used. According to Fujifilm, the filter has no effect on image sharpness and the resulting ‚combination of image sharpness and beautiful bokeh delivers portraits with a three-dimensional feel‘. Offering a focal length equivalent to 84mm in 35mm format, this lens is ideal for portraiture and, as a result has been designed for use at its widest aperture setting – or up to one stop down. This enables photographers to separate subjects from their backgrounds by blurring areas outside the plane of focus. The APD filter will provide a more attractive background blur from the new lens than  its predecessor could render………

Source: www.photoreview.com.au
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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West – The Red Centre of Australia . Part 2 | Noah Stammbach

I’ve heard and read about the outback being empty, with not much to see and not worth the travel. We Aussies prefer to live on the coast, leaving the vast interior of Australia as no-man’s land. I yearned to explore this expanse; to be alone in the barren plains and to feel the red spirit of Australia. It was difficult to find people keen for such a huge trip. The first time I met Johnny we talked about ferns and grasses (he’s a landscape architect) which happened to lead to the topic of the outback. We then recruited Koentadi (of @koentadyy) who was ready for his first Aussie roadtrip. Planning began in secret. We wanted to be the first to venture inland; far away from the typical destinations of the NSW coast. Some moments from this trip took me to the edge between calm and panic, but there’s always an unquestionable solace to be found in the middle of nowhere. Click here for part 1 of the trip, a story about the staggering variety of landscapes that unfolds in layers from Sydney to the outback……

Source: www.noahstammbach.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Xtend your Fuji system: All about that Hood | Rene Delbar

Let’s be honest: next to the ease-of-use of the Fujifilm X cameras, the advantages of their sensor, the performance of the XF glass and the resulting image quality, many X-shooters just love the retro design and handling of the bodies. Right from the start, with the original X100, we got a compact tool to completely enjoy taking pictures. If you’re old enough to have started photography with roll film or 35mm cassettes: just add “again” at the end. In order to augment the “old days” experience, we’ve been adding leather carrying and wrist straps, half cases, thumb grips, soft releases, old-fashioned cable releases… In the end though, you can’t but ask yourself: Why didn’t Fujifilm bring us sexier lens hoods? It started rather well actually. The X100’s fixed 23mm lens comes with a nice metal vented release. That comes handy when using the optical viewfinder, as less of the field of view is obstructed (as long as the openings are well aligned, hence the bayonet mount)……

Source: fujixtras.blogspot.fr


Fujinon XF Lenses

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Fuji XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD lens — a hands on review | Tom Grill

My favorite full frame lens for shooting lifestyle is an 85mm wide aperture. On a Fuji X camera this translates to the 56mm f/1.2.  A main reason for this choice is that I want to keep the background very soft so it doesn’t interfere with the main subject, while at the same time retaining some story-telling detail in the out-of-focus area. I am often afraid of using full frame lenses at a full aperture of f/1.4, since it often means sacrificing some detail in the focused area. The Fuji 56mm lens is different. I find I can use it at f/1.2 with no loss in sharpness in my main subject. I have already posted a full hands-on review of the Fuji XF 56mm f/1.2 R lens. Since it is the same lens used to create the APD model, I will spend my time here in discussing the only difference between the two models, the effects of the apodization filter, and refer the reader to the other review for a fuller explanation of the similarities the two lenses share……..

Source: aboutphotography-tomgrill.blogspot.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD ( Fujifilm ) – Review / Test Report |
Photozone

Verdict

So is the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD the magician that it is supposed to be ? Well, mostly. I reckon the sample images showed you that the bokeh is mostly as smooth as silk except in really difficult scenes (where most conventional lenses would fail as well). The rendition of out-of-focus highlights could be a little better though. Other than that, the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD inherits most of the characteristics from the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R. It combines an ultra-large aperture with high quality results. At large aperture settings the center quality is already pretty high whereas the borders/corners are at least on a good level. The resolution is much more snappy at f/2.8 and images are very sharp across the image field between f/4 and f/8. The very low amount of lateral CAs also contributes to the high sharpness perception. Image distortions are nothing to worry about whereas vignetting can be an issue in RAW images between f/1.2 and f/2. However, Fujifilm is relying on image auto-correction so this is usually a lesser issue from a user perspective……..

Source: www.photozone.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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Side by Side Comparison: XF56mm F1.2 R Lens vs
XF56mm F1.2 R APD Lens | Leigh Diprose


 
Last week, I released the second edition of What XF Lens Should I Buy? The response from the community was very positive, however I did receive a few questions asking if I could show the difference between the XF56mm F1.2 R and the XF56mm F1.2 R APD as both lenses looked very similar on paper. I’m happy to announce your requests have been answered in the form of a side by side comparison. To test the lenses I setup two Fujifilm X-T1’s and attached a XF56mm F1.2 R lens onto one of the bodies and the highly anticipated XF56mm F1.2 R APD lens on the other. There were a few controls I put in place to make the comparison as close as possible. First, I navigated through the camera’s setup menu and located the ‚Reset‘ menu, I then proceed to reset the ‚Shooting Menu‘ and ‚Set-up‘. Once this was complete I removed the Fujifilm UV filters from both lenses and cleaned the front element using a lens cloth. All images were captured in Aperture Priority using a 2 second self timer with electronic shutter turned off.  A 3 Legged Thing Tripod was used to ensure there was no camera movement during the exposure and all images bar the last two were photographed in a RAW format. Images were then exported as .jpegs using Lightroom 5.0 with no editing or alterations……

Source: www.fujifilm.com.au
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 APD R Review | PhotographyBLOG

Focusing

The Fujifilm XF 56mm F1.2 R APD lens has an internal focusing (IF) system. Unlike the original 56mm optic, the inclusion of the APD filter means that this lens does not support Phase Detect auto-focusing. In practice, we found the auto-focus to be fairly quick and mostly reliable in good light, but a little more hit and miss than the original 56mm lens in lower light situations. Note that this lens does have quite an audible auto-focusing noise, again something that has been addressed on other quieter XF lenses. The front of the lens does not rotate on focus, which is good news for anyone looking to use the lens in conjunction with a polariser or neutral density filter, something that is almost compulsory if you want to use the faster apertures outside in bright sunlight…….

Source: www.photographyblog.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Lens Review: Fujifilm XF56mm f/1.2 R APD | Bigheadtaco

The Fujifilm XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD is a great lens. It’s not because it’s the sharpest, or has the best colour or an array of other sought after features. It’s great because it’s unique. Not unlike much of the Fujifilm X series cameras and lenses, Fujifilm stands out as different and this gives their cameras and lenses an edge over every other brand. Why? Because when you shoot with most 85mm equivalent portrait lenses, everyone seems to be aiming for the same effect in the same exact way. Not Fujifilm. They remind me of Minolta in the 80’s and 90’s with their Dynax-Maxxum series of cameras and lenses. They were trend setters and made unusual cameras and lenses that puzzled many (9 blade circular aperture, programmable hold buttons on the lenses, flare cutter aperture, Smooth Trans Focus technology (apodization tech!), AF 500mm mirror lens, etc.) but had a huge legion of fans that liked their unique approach. In fact, this apodized lens by Fujifilm is the same technology that Minolta introduced on their 135mm STF lens in the 90’s (although the Minolta could alter the secondary aperture to change the bokeh), further proving my connection between Minolta and Fujifilm. How effective is this APD technology, and is it worth paying an extra $500 to get it? Let’s find out…….

Source: www.bigheadtaco.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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