Leica M

Fuji is the Leica of the new Millennium | Bill Palmer

So why do I say that Fuji is the 21st Century Leica? What is it about the X Series that makes it so much better? It’s a combination of factors, some organisational, some technological and some related to what I shall for the moment refer to as „momentum“. Let me explore five reasons that I believe explains where Leica have gone wrong and Fuji have gone right. 1. Fuji makes reliable cameras. Yes, I know Fuji has their moments—“orbs“ in the X10, sticky aperture blades in the X100, even the recent configuration settings amnesia in the new X-Pro2—but they deal with their occasional wobbles openly, promptly, courteously and with the minimum of inconvenience to their user community…..

Source: Fuji is the Leica of the new Millennium | Bill Palmer

Digital Camera in a Film Body — Purist Leica M-D Without Display, Menu or Buttons | Daniel Kestenholz #THEME

Love it. A digital Leica in a film body. Sure there’s a lot of malice on the Web, ridiculing Leica’s latest $6,000 camera, the all-black digital Leica M-D. With emphasis on digital. What again distinguishes a digital from an analog camera? That’s right, the LCD screen, to give access to what’s on the memory card and to all those menu functions. Now there is a digital camera without basic digital functions. The message of no display? Concentrate on the essentials…….

Source: www.the.me

Leica M-D: Review and first impressions | Mike Evans

Looks like Leica has announced a new basic M-E style M to the Leica Rangefinder lineup! Much like they did near the end of the M9 days, releasing the M-E, which was a basic M9 at its core, it seems they did it again with this new M-D. THIS tells me that a new M will be on the way this year, end of year. Yep, that is my prediction. It’s been 3 years since the M240, the M has a 3 year life cycle, and they now released the M-D. Which is in all reality, a BASE M 240, much like the M-E was a base M9. BUT doesn’t this sound odd? Did Leica not release the M 262 not too long ago which was a basic M240? Yep, but this time, the 5th member of the M family in production currently is without a rear LCD, much like the uber expensive M60. Instead of the rear LCD we have an ISO dial, much like on the old film cameras. THIS IS COOL, AND I NOW WANT ONE……..

Source: macfilos.com

The NEW Leica M – The Leica M-D without rear LCD. Back to basics | Steve Huff

Looks like Leica has announced a new basic M-E style M to the Leica Rangefinder lineup! Much like they did near the end of the M9 days, releasing the M-E, which was a basic M9 at its core, it seems they did it again with this new M-D. THIS tells me that a new M will be on the way this year, end of year. Yep, that is my prediction. It’s been 3 years since the M240, the M has a 3 year life cycle, and they now released the M-D. Which is in all reality, a BASE M 240, much like the M-E was a base M9. BUT doesn’t this sound odd? Did Leica not release the M 262 not too long ago which was a basic M240? Yep, but this time, the 5th member of the M family in production currently is without a rear LCD, much like the uber expensive M60. Instead of the rear LCD we have an ISO dial, much like on the old film cameras. THIS IS COOL, AND I NOW WANT ONE……..

Source: www.stevehuffphoto.com

Leica M Edition 60: A year’s shooting with the father of the M-D | John Reynolds

The moment he opened the box I knew what was going to happen. David Stephens had called earlier to say that the Leica M Edition 60, hereafter M60, which I had muttered under my breath, had arrived at The Leica Store Manchester and would I like to see it. Of course, why not? It was December 2014 and I had been intrigued by this unusual camera since Photokina that September. The M60 might be just what I wanted, a minimal, purposeful, well made and beautiful camera. I got to the store that very day, took the camera out of the box, held it in my hand, looked through the viewfinder, and bought it. Now, some 17 months later, Leica has announced the M-D, and Mike suggested it might be helpful to reflect a little on my time with the new camera’s parent……..

Source: macfilos.com

The Difference Between Black and White Digital and Film Explained | Leicaphilia

For those of us practiced in traditional silver halide photography, it’s obvious that b&w images (are there really any other kind?) made with film are different than digital b&w. Run your RAW files through any b&w film emulation program you desire and, at bottom, they come out looking different than a native black and white negative. It’s true: silver halide film is capable of certain aesthetic qualities that digital capture simply cannot match. It may be subtle at times, but it’s there, and unlike what some think, It’s not just film grain or lack thereof that constitutes the difference. It has to do with the differing ways film and digital sensors react to the same given amount of light. Digital sensors are linear. The actual output voltage from each cell of a digital sensor is directly proportional to the amount of light that strikes it during the exposure. As such, you can use three light sources and what you get will be the exact sum of the three. You can then subtract one of them and be left with the exact sum of the remaining two. Etc Etc………

Source: leicaphilia.com

New Horizons Part III: The Leica Monochrom | Ajit Menon

It’s been a while since I’ve now had the Leica Monochrom (Typ 246) and as such, I’ve had some time to collect my thoughts about the camera. My path to owning this latest iteration of Leica’s purely monochrome camera was a bit long-winded. I originally bought a used copy of the original Monochrom from the Leica Store Miami. Having used it for a good four months or so, I traded it in when the new version was finally available in stores. In the following post, I will give my thoughts on both and my reasons for the upgrade. The history of Leica is well-known and does not need much mention. But history would not offer much solace if the current line-up of products did not offer some semblance of quality. In the last few years, the landscape of digital photography has changed massively and even the traditional players such as Canon and Nikon are facing strong challenges from new players such as Sony with their competitive mirrorless cameras…….

Source: ajitmenon.com

Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) | Mehrdad Samak-Abedi

Es gibt so Kameras, die sind einfach was Besonderes. Es sind meist Produkte, die eine kleine Nische bedienen, sei es aufgrund ihres Aufnahmeformats, des Aufnahmemediums und/oder ihres Preises. Diese Kameras haben meist die Eigenschaft zu polarisieren! Es gibt glühende Verfechter und nicht minder extreme Gegner. In Zeiten der sehr leistungsfähigen Smartphones ist der Fotoapparat an sich ist ja schon auf eine Nische geschrumpft. Profis und ambitionierte Hobbyfotografen sind heute meist nur noch die Käufer von DSLR’s und (glücklicherweise eine immer mehr wachsende Anzahl) spiegellosen Systemkameras. Der Markt ist recht klar gegliedert. Es gibt die DSLR’s (von APSC bis Kleinbildsensor), es gibt die spiegellosen Systemkameras (von Mikro 4/3 bis Kleinbildformat) und es gibt die digitalen Mittelformatkameras (alles jenseits des Kleinbildformates). Während die letzt genannten an sich schon eine Nische bilden, gibt es in den ersten zwei Gruppen mindestens eine solche Nischenkamera. Sei es nun, weil die eine einen 50MP Sensor hat, oder die andere eine Kamera ist, die im Jahr 2016 immer noch bewusst keinen Autofokus hat…….

Source: www.qimago.de

Leica M Typ 240 Winter Landscape Field Test | Andy Tobin

Can a Leica M handle harsh winter conditions while providing excellent quality landscape images, and retaining it’s legendary usability? That was the question I had in mind as I set out for a fortnight of photography in Assynt, in the far north west of Scotland. It’s a place of unrivalled beauty and very target-rich from a photographic perspective. My first week was a landscape photography masterclass with an idol of mine, David Ward, about which you can find a write up here. The second week was intended to put everything I had learned into practice, in the company of a group of photographer friends who had travelled up. My weaponry for the trip was very minimal – My Leica M with 3 lenses, 28mm Elmarit, 50mm Summicron and 90mm Summicron APO ASPH. A spare battery, some Lee Seven5 filters, a cable release, an Olympus electronic viewfinder, and a Sony RX100 mkIV rounded off a very compact kit which all fitted into a Billingham Hadley bag. Add a carbon Velbon tripod to that list. My thoughts were that this little kit would be small and light enough to go anywhere easily without restricting either my creativity or my agility…….

Source: tobinators.com

Leica M262 Review: The rangefinder M returns to its roots | Mike Evans

While it will perform exactly as the more expensive 240, the 262 is intriguing precisely because of its relative simplicity and purity of concept. By all accounts it has had a very positive reception among dedicated rangefinder enthusiasts. M262 and 35mm Summicron ASPH. It represents a move back to rangefinder goodness that Leica fans have been demanding ever since the demise of the M9. Indeed, this nostalgia for the simpler life is manifested in the increasing demand for the previous M model, the M9. Now Leica has settled the sensor problem, second-hand M9s and M9-Ps are in greater demand. I know several owners of Ms and M-Ps who have recently bought “cheap” M9s as a second camera and to enjoy the simplicity and lighter weight of what is fast becoming a classic. Some have even gone back to the M9 exclusively because of its relative purity and easier handling…….

Source: macfilos.com

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