Black and White

Schwarz-Weiss ist Farbe genug | Peter Ziegler

Zumindest manchmal. Diese Behauptung habe ich von einem gewissen Jörg Langer. Er selbst bezeichnet sich als SW Freak. Leider passiert auf dieser Seite recht wenig. Aber das nur am Rande. SW Aufnahmen faszinieren mich schon immer! Mal mehr, mal weniger. In meinen Galerien habe ich immer mal SW Bilder dabei. Siehe Portraits, Kunst oder auch auf der Basel Seite. Selbst bei knallbunten Veranstaltungen sind schwarz-weiss Motive dabei. Im Grunde gibt es nur noch was zur Technik zu sagen. Wie schon beim Schlachtfest habe ich diese Bilder ausschließlich mit Fuji XE-2 und XT-1 gemacht! Objektive waren das Zeiss Touit 12mm, das 23mm und das 55- 200mm von Fuji! Bearbeitet mit Lightroom und Tonality Pro……..

Source: peterziegler.net

Why Shoot Black and White? | Eric Kim

Black and white is where my heart and soul is. I feel that by shooting in black and white, I can better communicate and convey my emotions, thoughts, and feelings. I feel that black and white is less of an aesthetic, but more of a feeling. You don’t shoot black and white because it is more “artsy”. You shoot black and white because it better communicates how you feel. Colors blind the eye. I have experimented a lot shooting color. I first started off trying to shoot color because I started to get bored with black and white. I wanted more of a challenge. Color seemed to open up new avenues and opportunities…….

Source: erickimphotography.com

Fuji X100T Project – Back to the Sea | Stuart Burrill

Back in March 2015 I went to the Photography Show with the intention of picking up a deal on a Fuji X100T.  I’ve always been a Canon user but there’s always been something enticing about the Fuji X100 and after trying out an X100s for a couple of months, that was it …. my mind was made up.  I wanted ….. no …. I needed the the X100T!  The intention was to have a decent pocketable camera (well coat pockets anyway) with creativity options and of course those wonderful colours that Fuji seem to have with their film simulations.  Errrr …. so it probably seems a little odd that I’ve chosen my first project to be in black and white but hey .. I’d been reading a copy of Black & White Photography magazine and it inspired me to try something different…..

Source: www.stuartburrillphotography.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Why choose Black and White in Street Photography? |
Street Photography London

Marius Vieth:

First of all, black and white is special, because it offers a fundamentally different visual perception of life. In case your photoreceptor cells aren’t completely dysfunctional, it’s exciting! If that wasn’t enough, you are simply holding a different pen when you are writing your photographic stories. The lack of colors and reduction to shades of black and white instantly underlines the depths of a photo – as long as it has depth. Third, black and white helps to highlight certain elements of your visual language such as textures, structures, shadows and light. Besides that, it shifts the focus to natural contrasts, which is one of the most important aspects of any great photo or painting. One more reason to to love black and white is that it helps to understand the incredible power of reduction in photography…….

Source: www.streetphotographylondon.co.uk

The 10 commandments of Lightroom black and white conversions |
Digital Camera World

Lightroom makes the process of converting a colour image to black and white a two-second job, but it’s deceptively easy. Good black and white conversion is not just about losing the colour; not all images work so well in black and white, and a cack-handed conversion sticks out like a sore thumb. Here’s a quick rundown of 10 essential considerations when you are mulling monochrome…

Source: www.digitalcameraworld.com
 


Fujinon XF Lenses

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

My Black’n’White settings for FujiFilm Cameras | Daniel Eliasson

The FujiFilm X100s is a great camera for street photography. Small enough to always carry with you, but competent enough to produce great black’n’white photos straight out of the camera. The predefined BnW film simulations in the camera are a bit dull. The photos will be very tame with low contrast. I really like deep black’n’white photos. The darkest parts should be black and the white should be crisp but not blown out. To achieve this I usually modify the standard settings a bit. Note that if you shoot in RAW, the Monochrome settings will be lost. Set the camera to shoot JPEG or both RAW + JPEG to use the photos straight out of the camera……..

Source: www.streetpeople.se
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Black and White photography post processing techniques in the
digital age | Joel Tjintjelaar

People familiar with my black and white post processing workflow may conclude that the technique I utilise for black and white post processing isn’t that advanced and are merely tricks to obtain a visual effect. It’s just partly true, yes, the techniques aren’t very advanced at all but no, they’re not just tricks to obtain a specific visual effect. The method I developed for myself, called iterative selective gradient masking 2.0 (iSGM2.0) and use in practice, originate from the fundamental notion that I can’t and won’t let myself be restricted in my artistic expressions by what is seemingly possible with the tools everyone knows for black and white photography post processing: Photoshop, Lightroom and plug-ins like Silver Efex Pro 2 and Topaz to name just a few……..

Source: www.bwvision.com

Street Photography Colour / Black and White | Matthew Hart

have been Shooting Street for a very long time now, right from as far back as I can remember so well over 40 years, it’s always been a part of me to shoot people as a subject, but when I shoot it has to be candid. True Street as I have always understood it, will not interfere with the dynamic in the street, and this is the Street Photography I love.  I know the point where you press the shutter to being spotted and getting a reaction or creating a reaction, is a very fine line involving fractions of a seconded, and find this point very well discussed in the street world. Street portraits are on the rise but I stopped asking a for portraits years back,  I do ask for the odd one or two if the subject is very exciting but hardly every post the images…..

Source: matthewhartphotography.wordpress.com
 


Fuji X-T1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

It’s all about light: making mood and strong images in monochrome |
Ming Thein

A couple of days ago, we looked at the inexact science of color and emotion: I don’t think anybody is going to argue that the mood and feeling of an image is influenced heavily by the dominant color palette, both in terms of the color of incident/reflected light and the color of the subject elements themselves. But how does this translate to black and white images? Obviously, it’s very possible to do since not every monochrome image feels the same. Even within the same sort of general lighting – say low key – it’s possible to produce variations in mood. How? As usual, the answer to this question goes back to light. Specifically, quality of light: diffusion, direction, primary and secondary sources, fill or reflection from surrounding objects, and the texture of your primary subjects themselves: what are they reflecting or absorbing? As you can see, there’s a huge amount of possibility here for variation – and control. The two main things to consider are direction and diffusion. A backlit image will feel very different to a side lit or front lit one; or worse, one lit from direction along the same axis as the camera (think direct flash)……..

Source: blog.mingthein.com

High-Contrast B&W With Lightroom | Romanas Naryškin

A while ago, I wrote an article on low-contrast B&W conversions with Lightroom. After reading through some of the response the article received I was pleasantly surprised that so many of our readers actually prefer low-contrast look over the ever-popular high-contrast conversions. That is not to say high-contrast B&W photography is in some way inferior, not at all. It is merely the more popular, the more easily accepted sort of look, which is exactly the reason why I saw fit to go against the wave and start with the opposite. Now, ever since I wrote that piece, I’ve received several requests for a similar article on a high-contrast conversion. This topic is particularly tricky for me since I rarely do high-contrast B&W, but the requests did remind me of one occasion where I was deliberately working towards such a result from the very start. And so, as always, we begin with a photograph……..

Source: photographylife.com

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