Fuji x100

Mad about Fuji Cameras | Michael Gane

I was taught the basics of photography by my wonderful Uncle who had a successful photography business in the City of London in the 70s; he was very well respected within the photography community and made his name for his Architectural photography, he had this amazing eye for capturing buildings and interiors, he always spoke about converging lines that drew the viewer into the image. He was a true master and taught me to take a moment and step back and really look at the scene in front on the lens. Another important lesson he taught me was, if I see something that catches my photography eye, just before firing the shutter let those emotions register as he believed (as do I) that those feelings and emotions transfer onto the censor! When I visited him in the big city, we would spend long hours photographing the cityscapes but also walk through the busy London streets photographing the people, capturing the lives of strangers on film, bringing those moment’s to life on film, yes film! ……

Source: www.thefxworks.co.uk

Fuji X100 WCL – Wide Conversion Lens Review | Colin Nicholls

Here is a short review of the Fuji WCL, I don’t bother with charts and all that so it’s just a few photos of the kit, what I think about it and a healthy dose of sample images, all images are shot RAW and edited in Lightroom. I’M WORKING WITH THE ORIGINAL X100. The Fuji WCL will turn your X100’s 35mm field of view into a 28mm [full frame equivalent] whilst keeping it an F2 lens and retaining the fuji quality, it screws on nice and simply, you then tell the camera it’s there and away you go. Its a nice small attachment that adds a good bit on length to the X100’s lens, allowing you (as with the TCL)  to hand hold it with the left hand and have a bit more support. Here is a comparison between the 18mm F2 and this WCL I’ve set them up the same so you can see the difference, they are both shot RAW and edited in Lightroom, apart from a bit of colour difference [not sure whats going on there] they are very similar…….

Source: www.colinnichollsphotography.com

Low Light Photography With The Fuji X Series / X-E2 & X100 | Colin Nicholls

Now it’s no secret that the Fuji X series can hold it’s own in the abilities of modern cameras to shoot in low light, maybe not to the dizzy extremes of some gear but it really can hold it’s own in the dark situations we sometimes face. This blog is a short review on how the X-E2 + X100 handle themselves in very dark conditions and how with the right glass (namely the 23 & 56) you can exploit a dark situation and get the shot. Now that’s not to say you don’t need some light, even with epic ISO levels a room which is flat and boring light wise won’t make a good shot, so here are some shots, the conditions and why I’m glad I could get the shot. The glorious Fuji 56mm and it’s super aperture of F1.2 allow you to gather loads of light, it’s hard to show how dark these scenes actually are on a blog post, but they are darker to the eye than the images look here, so pretty dark……

Source: www.fujixpassion.com

Fuji X Adventures in North America – Seeing Things in
Black and White | Peter Dareth Evans

As much as I love colour photography, there are some photographs that are just meant to be in black and white. However, in the shift they become less representational, more of a statement. Their worlds can be romantic, aching, nostalgic – or colder, darker, crueler. My exploration of Bradford continues, but here a friendly small town becomes lost in translation. There is no such thing as the commonplace. In monochrome, Bradford becomes something else… Something far away from Bedford Falls… A great feature of having a mirrorless camera such as the Fuji X cameras is that you can see in black and white. You quickly learn what scenes have a greater impact when shorn of the distractions of colour. When processing the images back home I found that the Replichrome preset package gave me a great consistent look in the form of their Kodak BW 400CN™ emulation. It can be found in the Replichrome I……

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Can the Fuji X100 work as a wedding camera? | Ian Hamilton

I’ve had my little Fuji X100 for a few years now. It’s been superseded by the X100S and X100T versions and there are rumours (as always in the camera industry) of another version being launched shortly. As a wedding photographer I have to use equipment that delivers results, every time. My main cameras are full-frame Nikons and they’re brilliant. But there are times when bigger isn’t better. When a small, discreet camera would be more appropriate to the situation. So, the question I hope to answer is – can the original Fuji X100 work as a wedding camera? Let me get one thing straight from the outset. This isn’t going to be technical review. I’m not going to be pixel-peeping and comparing images from the Fuji against the full-frame Nikons…….

Source: www.ianh.co.uk
 


Fuji X100T

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I detached the tele converter | Jonne Naarala

Today I decided to detach the TCL-X100 tele converter from my Fuji X100. Why so? I purchased it to get a 50 mm focal length to make the X100 better portrait camera and to get that FoV in general. The tele converter was working very nicely in outdoor use but I was not so happy with it indoors in poor lighting conditions. My intention was to use my Ricoh GR (28 mm equivalent) with my Fuji X100 with the tele converter (50 mm equivalent) to get two-camera combo which is small in size. Actually the X100 is not any small camera when the TCL-X100 is attached to it. That combination is almost same size (and actually heavier) than my Fuji X-Pro1 with XF 35/1.4 lens attached. And of course the XF 35/1.4 lens is much better than the tele converter. Sharper and faster. So, if I want a 28/50 mm combo the best option would be the GR with X-Pro1……..

Source: jonnenaarala.wordpress.com
 


Fuji TCL-X100

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Fuji X Adventures in North America – Rust Belt Pilgrim |
Peter Dareth Evans

This is McKean County, Pennsylvania. Once the Allegheny hills were a forest of oil derricks, stretching as far as the eye could see along the ridges and valleys between Bradford, Olean, Kane and Smethport.  But then after the second world war the Mid-West oil industry collapsed when richer and easier pickings were found elsewhere. Now the trees have returned to the hills of McKean County, where they tactfully mask the industrial scars of old leaking pipes and rusting machinery. Here in the deep forest you hike and hunt alone at your peril. Folk have fallen through the rotting boards covering the shafts of old oil wells. A sudden snap and then a long agonising tumble, a broken leg and no phone reception – miles from civilisation. So I made sure I stuck to the roadside for my photography. But still, here and there nestled in isolated pockets on the winding country roads, industry survives. Smoke rises from the stacks. Steam boils from the pipes. You can hear the hum of machinery and the clanking of gears and wheels. This is rust belt America, but here and there you can see signs of recovery. The county capital of Bradford may have lost half her population in the crash that followed the 1940’s, but unlike the deprived ex-mining communities in the valleys of South Wales there’s still hope…….

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Fuji X100 – Destination Maui, Hawaii | Brian Kraft

With wedding season being a little bit slower around here this time of year, we were able to make a trip to Hawaii. We left the snowy cold of Colorado and headed off to our destination of Maui. We met up with some family, living in China, and Hawaii was the perfect midway point to do so. With baby in tow, along with my new Fuji X100 camera, we had such a nice and relaxing time. The weather, water, topography, foliage, wildlife, food, company, and all were just perfect. We saw many amazing whales, snorkeled, boogie boarded, took our daughter for her very first dip in a pool and the ocean, walked, ate, ate some more, explored different towns, including Lahaina and one of my favorites- Paia. And as I sit back in the cold of Colorado, I consider the ways to make it to Hawaii more often and maybe even shoot some wedding photography there from time to time. Regardless, I kept my photographer hat on and thoroughly enjoyed documenting some of our adventures…

Source: www.briankraft.com
 


Fuji X100S

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Fuji X100 Rethink 2015 | Robert W. Boyer

Lots of stuff happens when I take time in early January each year to review the mish-mash of things I’ve flagged for future consideration. Distance and perspective go a long way. Last post I ranted a and raved about Fuji quite a bit and technical sufficiency etc. As I reviewed a lot of those flagged items since then some seat of the pants shots made with both my original X100 as well as my replacement X100S came up again and again. First and foremost subjects react differently to the X100 series of cameras. I’ve found the same thing, strike that, a similar thing when using my Nikon Df with tiny manual focus lenses. There is one difference that can be substantial. With the X100 cameras subjects have no idea when I take an image, that’s untrue in many environments with the Df. Sure that’s good in the usual way of candid-ness etc when making pictures on the Q.T. but it’s also a big deal even when the subject is fully aware. I’ve postulated on the why of this factor before. The other big deal which might be secondary but might as well be a bigger factor is how I feel and how I shoot when using one particular camera or another. The ego combined with rationality in all of us suggests that you can and will shoot the same way no matter what camera. All you have to do is do whatever that “way” is with intent. Easy to say — harder to practice, maybe impossible. Sure in some contrived test setup where you put a series of cameras on a tripod and shoot a subject with the intent of getting the same exact picture that’s going to produce almost if not identical shots. I can do that even with people by eliminating variables. That’s far far different than the kinds of circumstances I actually care about when taking pictures where I actually want lots of variables influencing the outcome. Big difference………

Source: photo.rwboyer.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji X Adventures in North America – A Town Called Bradford |
Peter Dareth Evans

The fall season. The clouds race in from the West, shading this small town nestled in the Allegheny hills of Pennsylvania. I’m here on holiday for four weeks and I’m pacing the streets looking for things to shoot; houses with character, broken kerb-stones, fallen leaves, vivid signs and… people. All it takes are a comfortable pair of shoes – keep walking and sooner or later you get lucky. I’m walking the suburbs straddling West Washington Street. I hear a guitar strumming, a voice mumbling Elvis songs in a club singer’s drawl. I ask for a picture and he sings to me, eyes shining with delight as the music in his headphones plays a soundtrack to his life. A smile and a thank you and he walks away. Strumming and singing he turns a corner and is out of sight. And over the next week I hear him now and again, here and there – in the distance, threading the same grid of streets. What’s his story? It’s small town America and I guess most folks in town know his ways. Only the out of town stranger remains in the dark. So you gather a picture book with your camera and try to guess the stories, or failing that make up your own. And sometimes between shots when face to face you chat a little and try to dig up some of that small town lore. But it’s the outsider they really want to talk about. What’s the deal with the accent? Where are you from? What are you doing in Bradford? Why not New York or Chicago or New Orleans? ……..

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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