Fuji x100

I detached the tele converter | Jonne Naarala

Today I decided to detach the TCL-X100 tele converter from my Fuji X100. Why so? I purchased it to get a 50 mm focal length to make the X100 better portrait camera and to get that FoV in general. The tele converter was working very nicely in outdoor use but I was not so happy with it indoors in poor lighting conditions. My intention was to use my Ricoh GR (28 mm equivalent) with my Fuji X100 with the tele converter (50 mm equivalent) to get two-camera combo which is small in size. Actually the X100 is not any small camera when the TCL-X100 is attached to it. That combination is almost same size (and actually heavier) than my Fuji X-Pro1 with XF 35/1.4 lens attached. And of course the XF 35/1.4 lens is much better than the tele converter. Sharper and faster. So, if I want a 28/50 mm combo the best option would be the GR with X-Pro1……..

Source: jonnenaarala.wordpress.com
 


Fuji TCL-X100

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Fuji X Adventures in North America – Rust Belt Pilgrim |
Peter Dareth Evans

This is McKean County, Pennsylvania. Once the Allegheny hills were a forest of oil derricks, stretching as far as the eye could see along the ridges and valleys between Bradford, Olean, Kane and Smethport.  But then after the second world war the Mid-West oil industry collapsed when richer and easier pickings were found elsewhere. Now the trees have returned to the hills of McKean County, where they tactfully mask the industrial scars of old leaking pipes and rusting machinery. Here in the deep forest you hike and hunt alone at your peril. Folk have fallen through the rotting boards covering the shafts of old oil wells. A sudden snap and then a long agonising tumble, a broken leg and no phone reception – miles from civilisation. So I made sure I stuck to the roadside for my photography. But still, here and there nestled in isolated pockets on the winding country roads, industry survives. Smoke rises from the stacks. Steam boils from the pipes. You can hear the hum of machinery and the clanking of gears and wheels. This is rust belt America, but here and there you can see signs of recovery. The county capital of Bradford may have lost half her population in the crash that followed the 1940’s, but unlike the deprived ex-mining communities in the valleys of South Wales there’s still hope…….

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Fuji X100 – Destination Maui, Hawaii | Brian Kraft

With wedding season being a little bit slower around here this time of year, we were able to make a trip to Hawaii. We left the snowy cold of Colorado and headed off to our destination of Maui. We met up with some family, living in China, and Hawaii was the perfect midway point to do so. With baby in tow, along with my new Fuji X100 camera, we had such a nice and relaxing time. The weather, water, topography, foliage, wildlife, food, company, and all were just perfect. We saw many amazing whales, snorkeled, boogie boarded, took our daughter for her very first dip in a pool and the ocean, walked, ate, ate some more, explored different towns, including Lahaina and one of my favorites- Paia. And as I sit back in the cold of Colorado, I consider the ways to make it to Hawaii more often and maybe even shoot some wedding photography there from time to time. Regardless, I kept my photographer hat on and thoroughly enjoyed documenting some of our adventures…

Source: www.briankraft.com
 


Fuji X100S

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Fuji X100 Rethink 2015 | Robert W. Boyer

Lots of stuff happens when I take time in early January each year to review the mish-mash of things I’ve flagged for future consideration. Distance and perspective go a long way. Last post I ranted a and raved about Fuji quite a bit and technical sufficiency etc. As I reviewed a lot of those flagged items since then some seat of the pants shots made with both my original X100 as well as my replacement X100S came up again and again. First and foremost subjects react differently to the X100 series of cameras. I’ve found the same thing, strike that, a similar thing when using my Nikon Df with tiny manual focus lenses. There is one difference that can be substantial. With the X100 cameras subjects have no idea when I take an image, that’s untrue in many environments with the Df. Sure that’s good in the usual way of candid-ness etc when making pictures on the Q.T. but it’s also a big deal even when the subject is fully aware. I’ve postulated on the why of this factor before. The other big deal which might be secondary but might as well be a bigger factor is how I feel and how I shoot when using one particular camera or another. The ego combined with rationality in all of us suggests that you can and will shoot the same way no matter what camera. All you have to do is do whatever that “way” is with intent. Easy to say — harder to practice, maybe impossible. Sure in some contrived test setup where you put a series of cameras on a tripod and shoot a subject with the intent of getting the same exact picture that’s going to produce almost if not identical shots. I can do that even with people by eliminating variables. That’s far far different than the kinds of circumstances I actually care about when taking pictures where I actually want lots of variables influencing the outcome. Big difference………

Source: photo.rwboyer.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji X Adventures in North America – A Town Called Bradford |
Peter Dareth Evans

The fall season. The clouds race in from the West, shading this small town nestled in the Allegheny hills of Pennsylvania. I’m here on holiday for four weeks and I’m pacing the streets looking for things to shoot; houses with character, broken kerb-stones, fallen leaves, vivid signs and… people. All it takes are a comfortable pair of shoes – keep walking and sooner or later you get lucky. I’m walking the suburbs straddling West Washington Street. I hear a guitar strumming, a voice mumbling Elvis songs in a club singer’s drawl. I ask for a picture and he sings to me, eyes shining with delight as the music in his headphones plays a soundtrack to his life. A smile and a thank you and he walks away. Strumming and singing he turns a corner and is out of sight. And over the next week I hear him now and again, here and there – in the distance, threading the same grid of streets. What’s his story? It’s small town America and I guess most folks in town know his ways. Only the out of town stranger remains in the dark. So you gather a picture book with your camera and try to guess the stories, or failing that make up your own. And sometimes between shots when face to face you chat a little and try to dig up some of that small town lore. But it’s the outsider they really want to talk about. What’s the deal with the accent? Where are you from? What are you doing in Bradford? Why not New York or Chicago or New Orleans? ……..

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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A Walk in Istanbul from the Grand Bazaar to Fatih Mosque |
Chris Pattison

If you are visiting a new place on a short break, and have an aversion to organised tours (as most street photographers surely have) it is a very good idea to do some research before you go. Skim through a decent travel guide to get an idea of where you want to go. If you are visiting a huge metropolis like Istanbul, and only have 3 days like I did, you could zone in on three areas you find of interest and dedicate one day to each of them. And so it came to pass on the first full day in Istanbul, my mate Colin and I began to cover the ground we had roughly mapped out a couple of weeks before back home. Starting from our hotel, our intent was to visit the Grand Bazaar (Kapalı Çarşı) first of all and then make our way north-west towards Fatih Mosque (Fatih Camii), taking in the sights and sounds along the way, of which there are many. The Grand Bazaar is rightly a major tourist attraction; an ancient proto-shopping mall of some 66 streets and four thousand shops. It’s definitely pleasurable exploring the bazaar, but from a street photographer’s perspective, there are better hunting grounds. The place has been so well-trodden by travellers wielding cameras that many of the shops now display signs asking you not to take photographs of their wares. That’s a bit like a herd of wildebeest planting a placard in the ground for lions to read saying, “We know what you are up to, but please don’t bother. We are tired of it and we aren’t actually that tasty” …….

Source: streetlevelphotography.com

Day 1: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/11/15/of-mosques-and-cats-a-walk-in-istanbul-from-the-grand-bazaar-to-fatih-mosque/
 
Day 2: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/12/23/never-mind-the-rain-heres-the-istanbul-a-walk-around-sultanahmet/
 
Day 3: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/12/30/hunting-shopping-and-fishing-a-walk-in-istanbul-from-galata-bridge-to-taksim-square/
 
 


Fuji X100S

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Bekenntnisse eines Fujifilm X-Fotografen | Christian Ahrens

Seit der Photokina 2010 bin ich X-Fotograf. Da war ich am Stand von Fujifilm und begrabbelte entzückt ein Modell der gerade vorgestellten Fujifilm X-100. Bei der funktionierte außer dem revolutionären Sucher zwar noch nichts, aber ich wusste, dass ich mir diese Kamera kaufen würde. Das habe ich rund ein halbes Jahr später auch getan. Dann kam Fujifilm mit der XE-Reihe und der Möglichkeit, Wechselobjektive zu verwenden. Ich liebte sie. Dann habe ich sie auf einem Segeltörn in die Ostsee geworfen (in trauter Gemeinsamkeit mit einem weiteren Objektiv und einem iPad). Shit happens. Eine zweite XE-1 wurde angeschafft, weitere Objektive. Und jetzt – vor wenigen Tagen erst – die XE2. Ich bin X-Photographer. Mit Leidenschaft und Liebe. Ein Bekenntnis und eine Einladung…….

Source: www.christianahrens.de
 


Fuji X-E1

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Making street portraits (with the Fuji x100) | Olivier Duong

Neill Soden is a photographer currently living in South Africa. He has a Fuji X100 and shares how he makes his portraits with the camera. If I see someone I would like to take a portrait of, I’ll get all my settings ready before approaching them, so I am ready to start shooting at once. I set it with my Custom 2 (B/W) in the Q-menu and get my focus point in the desired position. I will switch to the EVF, as it allows me to see my exposure and lighting as close as possible to the result I will get. My black and white customs setting is B&W+red, highlights to +1 and shadows to +2. Auto ISO is on, so my Fn button is set to ND-filter if it is needed. The key is to do it as quick as possible. Try not to take up too much of the person’s time and not too intrude too much. I will walk up to them with the camera loosely by my side. Getting it pushed straight into their face will not be welcomed by anyone. After I greeted and asked how they are doing, I will ask if I can take the a photo. In the event of there being a language barrier, I will point at the camera and ask if I can take the image. If they happen to say no, I thank them and walk away. I rarely find people to not gladly accommodate you……..

Source: www.theinspiredeye.net
 


Fuji X100S

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X100 and X100T jpgs | Calogero Randazzo

This is not a comparison, more a real life usage of the X100 and its successor. I just want to show the different jpg rendering and both camera´s have its own look. As far as the image quality I wouldn´t say, the X100T is better (only in high ISO above 3200). But when it comes to ease of use the X100T is much more responsive, quicker and configurable. AF locks precisely, especially in low light. In good light condition the X100 is almost on par. All images shot with the X-100T and X100 using black&white yellow filmsimulation. No post-production, straight out of the camera……

Source: www.mingart.de
 


Fuji X100T

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Fujifilm X100 long exposure practice. ….. Finally | Simon Peckham

At last …. Heading out to the Lake District taking the camper I knew I would be able to find the perfect time and location for a spot of long exposure shooting. The plan was to stick faithfully to the 1Camera1Lens project however I was not able to take the normal 35mm Fujifilm XE1 combination after finding out that the sensor in this camera was very dirty. I have never cleaned a sensor before so I ordered a lens cleaning kit and waited for delivery. Unfortunately it turned up on the day we were due to leave for Lake Holiday. I did not want to rush this procedure for fear of damaging my XE 1. I took the decision to leave the XE1 at home and take the Fujifilm X100. (My old sole mate). The 10stop Hoya filter will fit all of my lenses as I have a group of conversion rings so I can swap 39mm up to 52mm if needed. So how did it go take a look after the page break…….

Source: simonpeckham.com

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