Fujifilm

Medium Format mirrorless digital camera system GFX | FUJIFILM

Obtaining the ultimate in photo image quality

Since the introduction of the X100 in 2011, Fujifilm has strived to achieve the world’s highest level of image quality with its X Series of cameras. The latest and the most advanced addition is the new medium-format mirrorless camera “GFX.” It uses the new large-diameter “G Mount” and incorporates a large 43.8×32.9mm CMOS sensor in the first-ever such move by Fujifilm. Boasting the effective pixel count of 51.4 million, the camera delivers superior sharpness and image quality that will satisfy professional photographers shooting commercial, fashion or fine-art landscapes. It uses the “X Processor Pro” imaging processor, which provides Fujifilm’s outstanding color and tone reproduction, delivering unparalleled photographic expression that can only be offered thanks to Fujifilm’s unique expertise in medium-format cameras.

All new mirrorless camera with a large sized sensor

The GFX is an all-new mirrorless camera system that revolutionizes the concept of medium-format cameras.
Compared to conventional medium-format digital cameras, the GFX is astonishingly lightweight and compact, and its dust and weather resistant body gives it the durability required for outdoor shoots. A collection of accessories that meet the needs of photographers, including a vertical battery grip and a rotary adapter that can rotate the detachable electronic viewfinder to any angle to suit any scene will be launched at the same time. The camera also supports tethered shooting, which has become an essential part of the professional photographers’ workflow, and will be compatible with various RAW conversion application software.

Fresh descriptive performance with new lenses and new lens mount

The design and manufacturing expertise nurtured over many years of FUJINON lens development has been used to produce lenses with the world’s highest level of image resolution. Unique to the new GFX, Fujifilm has developed a new “G Mount” with a short flange back distance of just 26.7mm, an advantage of the mirrorless camera system. Initial lens lineup consists of six lenses; a standard prime “GF63mmF2.8 R WR” (equivalent to 50mm in the 35mm format), a wide-angle standard zoom “GF32-64mm F4 R LM WR” (equivalent to 25-51mm in the 35mm format) and a mid-telephoto macro 1:0.5 “GF120mmF4 Macro R LM OIS WR” (equivalent to 95mm in the 35mm format), a fast aperture mid-telephoto “GF110mmF2 R LM WR” (equivalent to 87mm in the 35mm format), a super wide “GF23mmF4 R LM WR” (equivalent to 18mm in the 35mm format), a wide “GF45mmF2.8 R WR” (equivalent to 35mm in the 35mm format)……

Source: Medium Format mirrorless digital camera system GFX

Fuji announces GFX 50S medium-format camera at Photokina | Amateur Photographer

PHOTOKINA 2016, COLOGNE, GERMANY, September 19, 2016—FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) is proud to announce the development of the mirrorless digital camera system “GFX” to deliver the highest image quality in the history of Fujifilm electronic imaging. The company will release mirrorless digital camera FUJIFILM GFX 50S which features the FUJIFILM G Format 43.8 . 32.9mm sensor with 51.4 megapixels and six lenses that will be introduced under the new FUJINON GF Lens series of interchangeable lenses after early 2017 sequentially for professional photographers and photo enthusiasts. The new series deliver the highest image quality Fujifilm offers as well as outstanding expandability and functionality as a camera system.

Over the course of its proud history that extends over 80 years, Fujifilm has developed and manufactured photographic films with advanced image resolution and outstanding color and tone reproduction to meet the needs of professional photographers and photo enthusiasts, an extensive range of professional cameras under the consistent philosophy that “a camera is a tool for producing artwork,” and high quality FUJINON lenses which forms an indispensable part of camera systems. All these technologies have been amassed to develop the GFX, which uses a medium-format sensor to achieve the highest level of image quality and a completely new type of mirrorless system, and its companion FUJINON GF lenses. Professional-use Mirrorless Camera System “GFX” 2/4. As a long-term manufacturer of photographic films and medium-format film cameras, Fujifilm was always aware of the impact which different format sizes have on photographic expressions. Using a larger format gives ultimate enhancement to a camera’s ability to capture “texture quality,” “stereoscopic effect” and “aerial feeling,” which cannot be attained even by substantially increasing the sensor’s pixel count. Since the launch of the X Series, an increasing number of professional photographers and photo enthusiasts expressed their desire to achieve the ultimate world of photographic expression with the X Series’ signature color reproduction. The GFX camera system with “G Format” is Fujifilm’s response to their desire.

 

Highlight Features
(1) Obtaining the ultimate in photo image quality
Since the introduction of the X100 in 2011, Fujifilm has strived to achieve the best image quality possible with its X Series of cameras. The latest and the most advanced addition is the new medium-format mirrorless camera GFX. It uses the new large-diameter “G Mount” and incorporates a large 43.8 . 32.9mm CMOS sensor. Boasting the effective pixel count of 51.4 million, the camera delivers superior sharpness and image quality that will satisfy professional photographers shooting commercial, fashion or fine-art landscapes. The sensor’s 51.4 megapixels can be adapted to various aspect ratios, including 4:3 (default), 3:2, 1:1, 4:5, 6:7 and 6:17, which were available in film cameras of the large- and medium-formats. The camera uses the “X-Processor Pro” imaging processor, which provides Fujifilm’s outstanding color and tone reproduction at an extremely high level. The result is the ultimate capability in photographic expressions that only Fujifilm can deliver thanks to its extensive knowledge in medium-format cameras and large-format films.

 

(2) Mirrorless camera system with a large sized sensor
The GFX is an all-new mirrorless camera system that revolutionizes the concept of medium-format cameras. Compared to conventional medium-format digital SLR cameras, the GFX is lighter weight, achieving a far more compact form factor. With regards to functionality, the camera follows in the footsteps of the X Series by featuring numerous physical buttons and dials, and is designed with an ergonomic grip, shaped carefully and optimized for the camera body and lenses. This model becomes Fujifilm’s Professional-use Mirrorless Camera System “GFX” 3/4 first model to use a detachable electronic viewfinder, which you can remove when using an external monitor or wanting to make the system even lighter. In addition, an optional adapter makes it possible to fit the EVF in any angle, giving greater freedom in the choice of shooting angle. Other optional accessories that will be released at the same time, include the Vertical Battery Grip, which enhances functionality when shooting in the portrait orientation. The camera also supports tethered shooting, which has become an essential part of the professional photographers’ workflow, and will be compatible with various RAW conversion application software.

 

(3) New lenses with a new lens mount for added descriptive performance
A new lineup of FUJINON GF lenses, designed specifically for the GFX, supports the new G Mount. Taking advantage of the mirrorless system’s structure, the G Mount has the short flange back distance of just 26.7mm to shorten the back focus distance as much as possible. This prevents vignetting to achieve edge-to-edge sharpness of the world’s highest level. The initial lineup on launch is to include the following six lenses:

1. Standard prime “GF63mmF2.8 R WR” (equivalent to 50mm in the 35mm format)
2. Wide-angle standard zoom “GF32-64mmF4 R LM WR” (equivalent to 25-51mm in the 35mm format)
3. Mid-telephoto macro 1:0.5 “GF120mmF4 Macro R LM OIS WR” (equivalent to 95mm in the 35mm format)
4. Fast aperture mid-telephoto “GF110mmF2 R LM WR” (equivalent to 87mm in the 35mm format)
5. Ultra wide “GF23mmF4 R LM WR” (equivalent to 18mm in the 35mm format)
6. Wide “GF45mmF2.8 R WR” (equivalent to 35mm in the 35mm format)
Professional-use Mirrorless Camera System “GFX” 4/4

The lenses feature an aperture ring, a popular feature in the X Series, and have the new C (Command) Position on the ring to enable aperture adjustments with the Command Dial on the camera body. All the lenses feature dust and weather resistant construction that withstands operation at temperatures as low as minus 10 degrees Celsius, allowing you to take them outdoors with peace of mind. This gives these lenses a strong potential, suitable for professional use in tough conditions.
* Design and specifications may be subject to change without notice.

Source: Fuji announces GFX 50S medium-format camera at Photokina. – Amateur Photographer

Further Fuji Thoughts | The Lightweight Photographer

At the weekend I managed to take the Fuji XT1 out for a full day’s photography. In short, I loved using it but there was a nagging concern throughout that my images were being affected by the possible water colour effect. Am I right to be worried or am I imagining problems where there aren’t any? Here’s an update following the day: Initially I purchased two lenses, a 10-24mm and 18-135mm. The 18-135mm was always going to be a bit of a compromise in terms of image quality but I reasoned that the trade-off between optical performance and the convenience of using one lens was acceptable. In the end, a lot of the images I found unacceptable were shot with this lens so it went back……

Source: Further Fuji Thoughts « The Lightweight Photographer

Fujifilm’s portrait primes. A comparison | Victor Hamke

Hi guys. My name is Victor and together with Ronja I’m part of Muse & Mirror, a wedding photography duo. I’m also a Fujifilm X-Photographer for those who care. I’d like to start with saying what this blog post is about:

  •  General thoughts about focal lengths for portraiture
  •  Fujis primes, their real life efficiency and my hands-on experience with them

I won’t bore you with charts and stuff as it doesn’t matter to myself and you can read those reviews elsewhere. I decided to write this article for two reasons. The first one is that I coincidentally have all of Fujis „portrait“ primes at home at the moment. The second reason is that I’ve read tons of stuff about all those focal lengths before buying but never saw them in such a broad comparison, so I thought that this could be helpful for any of you that are a little bit lost on which one to choose. For those of you who don’t know me: I use Fuji for all my work, but I have two dominant sections which are wedding photography (+ portraits) and Fine Art Composings. So I think my review suits people photographers the best – at least this is what I will focus on……

Source: Elegante Hochzeitsfotografie aus Leipzig von Muse & Mirror / Fujifilm’s portrait primes. A comparison.

When GAS becomes stupid | Stockografie

I know, I know. In my last blogpost I told you all about my switch from X to F and now this. I am hear to tell you that the X is back. How stupid is that, you will think. And rightly so. After just a few weeks of using the very, very good Olympus Pen-F with the 12mm f/2 and 17mm 1.8 prime lens and the 12-40 2.8 Zoom lens I figured that I was and maybe still am caught in the terrible spiral of GAS. Is the Olympus Pen-F a better camera than my trusty X-T1 was? Am I taking better pictures than before? What about the size and weight? Well, the Olympus Pen-F is a great camera but not really better than the Fujifilm X-T1 is. It is just different. I definitely am not taking better pictures than before. The size of the body itself is about the same as the X-T1. The lenses are smaller. If I look at the size of the 12-40 2.8 in comparison to the XF 16-55 2.8 then size does become noticeable. I know all about the more shallow depth of field and stuff. But an f/2.8 lens no matter how large the sensor behind it is, is always letting in the same amount of light onto the sensor…..

Source: When GAS becomes stupid – STOCKOGRAFIE

Interview with Jonas Jacobsson, from Sweden | Fuji X Passion

Well, I’m 25 years old and currently in my final year on my masters in Industrial Design Engineering, here in Gothenburg Sweden. So studying to become an engineer is what I spend most of my time doing actually, although what people see is probably mainly my photography. If I could I would probably want spend most of my life exploring the world as I feel that is the most rewarding and humbling experience you can have. That is also perhaps my biggest goal with my photography – exploring and trying to capture inspiration that I can forward to people among me that see my work. Forwarding the inspiration so to speak……

Source: Interview with Jonas Jacobsson, from Sweden – FUJI X PASSION

Why The Fujifilm X Series Images Are So „Film-Like“ | Dan Bailey

In just a few days, after months of anticipation, the new Fujifilm X-T2 will finally hit shelves. Given the vastly upgraded specs of the X-T2, I see this being a game changing camera for many photographers who are intrigued by the idea of using smaller, lighter gear, but still want the performance and image quality of a DSLR.However, instead of talking about how awesome it is under the hood, I’d like to highlight another aspect of the X-T2, and all of the X Series cameras. The topic of this post is why the Fujifilm images look so damn good.Yes, I speak totally subjectively here. Image files from just about every other camera that’s made today look really good too. Nikon images look great. So do Canon, Olympus and Sony images.However, there’s something slightly different about the way the Fuji images, especially their JPEGS, look compared to other cameras, and this appeals to many photographers. Fuji’s Secret Sauce is their proprietary X-Trans sensor. Let’s look at how it’s different, and more importantly, why it’s different……

Source: Why The Fujifilm X Series Images Are So “Film-Like” | Dan Bailey’s Adventure Photography Blog

Meine Zweite Liebe – Fuji | Peter Ziegler

Meine erste Liebe zur Fotografie begann 1973 mit dem Kauf einer Canon F1. Seinerzeit schrieb ein gewisser Nörgelmann – alias Alexander Borell – einen Praxistest im Foto Magazin über eben diese Kamera von Canon. Zur Auswahl standen damals nur die Nikon F oder die Canon F1. In einem Mannheimer Fotogeschäft wollte man mir partout die Nikon schmackhaft machen. Ich ließ mich nicht beirren und verließ – stolz wie Oskar – den Laden mit einer nagelneuen F1 und einem Normalobjektiv von 50mm mit Lichtstärke 1,4. Zu dieser Zeit war das 50mm Objektiv die Standartbrennweite. Kein Mensch dachte damals an ein Kit-Zoom. Das Umfeld beneidete mich um diese Kamera, hauptsächlich bei der Bundeswehr. Dort war ich während meines Wehrdienstes der einzige gelernte Werkzeugmacher unter lauter Fotografen, Retuscheuren und Reprofotografen…….

Source: Meine Zweite Liebe – Fuji – Peter Ziegler Fotografie

Evolution of autofocus for X-T2 and X-Pro2 Ver. 2.00 | FUJIFILM

We will talk a little more on the evolution of autofocus for X-T2 and X-Pro2 Ver.2.00 by comparing it to the AF performance of X-Pro2 Ver.1.00. First, there are more AF points. Take a look at the screenshot below. You will notice that there are two additional lines of AF points at both right and left end of the display. The number of AF points for the phase detection pixels remains the same. They are for the contrast AF, but with the 384fps readout capability of X-Trans CMOS III, the fast processing power of X-Processor Pro, and the newly designed lens range will make the contrast AF fast enough that we are certain you will see the difference. X-Pro2, Is the AF faster? This will especially be valuable if your style of photograph is to have the camera on a tripod and compose your picture carefully before deciding on the focus point…….

Source: Evolution of autofocus for X-T2 and X-Pro2 Ver.2.00 | X Stories | FUJIFILM X

Why I sold all my Fujifilm kit… | Cameron Mead

After 2.5 years or so shooting with various lenses and my amazing Fujifilm XE2, I decided that I had had enough. Too many lenses and options including bigger lenses (xf23 1.4). My favorite lens has been the 27mm for the reason that it made photography fun and have captured some of my favorite photos ever with it since I would often have it with me. I also have a 70d kit with a few zoom lenses to take out when I really want to cover an event, usually motorsport or surf etc, so really I felt I didn’t really need two full systems with lens options for each. The simple one lens option makes you think less about options and just more about the shot, its light and a joy to use and shoot with. BUT I found that with the Fujifilm I was always constantly unsure which lens to take as they are all so good……..

Source: Why I sold all my Fujifilm kit… – OnCam Photography

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