Fujifilm

Leaving Nikon for Fujifilm | Bradley Hanson

I’ve been photographing weddings all over the world since 1999. Prior to that, I was shooting for the Seattle weekly papers and doing portraits. In high school, I was the yearbook photographer and developed my own film for my high school newspaper and wrote record reviews. It was only interesting to me, so I’ll skip the details. This is an article about equipment, but I take the same photographs, regardless of the camera. Hasselblad, Leica, iPhone, Holga. I will think about composition differently in it’s a square format or a panoramic format, but I’m always me. The photographer makes the photograph. Photographers should let go of fetishizing the tools used and redirect that energy into the final image. When digital started taking over around 2003, I used to be obsessed with shooting film and considered digital to be an affront to that……

Source: www.fujixpassion.com

Spring a year ago – Landscape photography | Mac Sokulski

It’s been exactly a year ago, when these photographs were taken.  Sometimes I wonder, why it takes me such a long time to share them.  I think it’s the combination of procrastination and being lazy.  It’s not that I don’t want to share, or think these are bad images…. I mean I wouldn’t be sharing them at all if I thought they were bad.  Just that I have a huge back log of images that just sitting in a dropbox folder, all dusted and almost forgotten.  It seems that I must be taking too many images :) I think it’s also a little bit of a memory lane.  Going through the old images and think about the times they were taken.  Funny thing is, I remember exactly what I was doing at that time.  What me and Kasia were talking about.  Yet I can’t remember what I did last week. Funny that…….

Source: www.miksmedia.photography

Lightroom Vs Fuji | Sean McCormack

We as Fujifilm users have a bit of a love hate relationship with Adobe and Lightroom. The combined asset management and image development makes for a great workflow environment, but the way Fujifilm X files are handled can be a little tear inducing at times. Previews especially take much longer to generate and read than normal Bayer Array based sensors. Even at Import, you have to wait while the tiny thumbnails load one at a time into the image preview area. If you’re Importing from a card where images have already been imported, it also takes ages for Lightroom to find the ‘Suspected Duplicates’ and show them as already imported. Other camera systems seem to zip along in comparison. Once the previews have been created on Import, everything runs the same as any other camera system……

Source: fujilove.com

Focal Lengths from 10mm to 560mm aka 15mm to 840mm | Brandon Remler

I’m really digging what I can do with the not so heavy XF100-400 lens around town.  The lens is pretty versatile from grabbing birds in flight to shooting flowers as I showed in the previous post highlighting the lens. This series is a range from XF10mm in the first one then XF16mm  all the up to the end of the XF100-400 at various focal lengths. Going out to a for reaching 560mm which starts to have issues with general air pollution and haze. The 560 is reached with the 400mm and the 1.4xTC – so an X focal length of 560mm or converted to conventional 35mm this would be equal to approximately 840mm.  There is a street sign sort of lower left of center which I zoom in on as we look at the high power view…….

Source: brandonremler.blogspot.de

Review: Cactus V6 Transceiver and the Fujifilm X system | Piet Van den Eynde

Earlier, I reviewed the excellent Godox Ving V850 manual flash. It still is one of my favorite flashes for off-camera flash photography in general and on my Fuji system in particular. However, recently, I’ve also been working a lot with another manual system: the Cactus RF-60 flash and the Cactus V6 transceiver. As this is a manual system, it isn’t exclusive to Fuji users: almost any camera with a central firing pin on the hotshoe can use it. That’s the beauty of manual flashes: they work on every camera. In this blog post, I’ll focus on the V6 transceiver……

Source: www.morethanwords.be

Lee Filters – 100mm or Seven5 on the Fuji X | Bill Allsopp

I am currently running Fuji X cameras alongside a Canon 5D Mk3 although I suspect this will not last for long, I feel so much more comfortable with the X-T1 and X-Pro2 and the lesser weight of the Fuji X system suits me too. With the Canon I needed the 100mm Lee Filter System but I experimented with the Seven5 on the Fuji X cameras. I have wondered for some time what I would take with me when I sold the Canon and so it seemed sensible to make a comparison of the graduated filters and weigh up the pros and cons. First step was to make a proper comparison of the extent of the graduation and see how much difference there is in the fall off; simple enough to do by placing identical strength filters from each system along side each other. The pictures tell the story quite clearly. Now what of other considerations? …….

Source: billallsopp.com

Depth of field in deep | Pixel basis – Film format basis  | FUJIFILM X

Where do you set the focus? One should always consider this question. How accurately do you want to focus? That is another important question. And on what basis are you adjusting the focus? Does it suit your needs and style? X-Pro2 allows two options for „Depth of Field Scale“: Pixel basis and Film format basis. This allows you to adjust the camera setting to suit your need and style. Technically, the only region that is in focus is one particular plane parallel to the optical axis. All other area will be out of focus, even when moved by 1mm. All other plane are in „bokeh“, theoretically that is. The reality is that, the amount of bokeh is so tiny that it appears to be sharp. You can basically ignore it. „Depth of Field“ is about the plane in focus and areas in front and back of the plane that appear to be in focus (although it is defocused in theory)…….

Source: fujifilm-x.com

Is That Lens Sharp In The Corners? No? Are You Sure? | Dennis A. Mook

Often I hear photographers and reviewers remarking that a certain lens is not sharp in the corners. But is it really not sharp?  Or maybe what you are seeing is the result of a curved field lens being tested against a flat subject.  I wrote about curved field lenses versus flat field lenses with some illustrations on the difference here..  If you are interested, please follow the link and read it.Here is a practical example of what I mean.  The image above was made using the highly touted Fujifilm 23mm f/1.4 XF lens.  The lens is very sharp, even wide open and contains an aspherical element.  I used it to demonstrate that, looking at the image above, one may wrongly conclude that the lens is not sharp in the corners……

Source: www.thewanderinglensman.com

X­-Pro1 to X-­Pro2 | Knut Koivisto

I can still remember the day I heard the news about the coming Fujifilm X-Pro1. It’s four years ago but it’s still a clear memory. I could see that all I had wished for in a digital camera was in the X-Pro1. I just knew I had to have it and I wanted to be the first. My love affair with the digital Fujifilm cameras started already with the X100 in 2011. I had been looking for the perfect digital camera for almost ten years and tried a lot of different brands and models but none of them came close to my demands. I wanted a camera that would perform the image quality and handling of a professional but with the size of almost a compact camera. When the date for the release of the X-Pro1 came up I contacted my professional camera dealer ProCenter in Stockholm and told them, I need to have the first X-Pro1 that you get! I called them every day and demanded to know, when will you have the camera! So I got the first sample and I’m convinced it was the first in Sweden………

Source: fujifilm-x.com

Is the X-Pro2 AF Faster? | X Stories | FUJIFILM X

The truth about the „Fastest“

„The AF is faster“. That is the impression that many users are left with, when they test the new X-Pro2 that are now being displayed in many showrooms and in stores. It is not hard to imagine that many of those that are eager to test the X-Pro2 are the X-Pro1 users. X-Pro2 has seen a major improvement in AF performance compared to the X-Pro1. So the above impression is in fact „true“. But if you are comparing the speed with the X-T1, X-E2 or X-T10 (cameras with phase detection AF), then your impression is „wrong in terms of numbers, but true feeling-wise.“ „The fastest AF speed“of the X-Pro2, measurement based on the CIPA guideline, is same as other cameras with the phase detection AF. X-Pro2 is not breaking the record of the AF fastest speed of the X Series. „The fastest AF speed“ is a bit tricky one. This measurement is conducted under a particular environment specified by the guideline. So the shooting scene inevitably gets detached from the real shooting environment. The score of the AF speed isn’t necessarily what the users experience in reality. Therefore we say it is „wrong in terms of numbers, but true feeling-wise“……..

Source: fujifilm-x.com

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