Leica M lenses

Using M Lenses on Fujifilm X Cameras | La Vida Leica!

In our first Fujifilm related review, Fujifilm X-T1 vs. the Leica T – we touched on using various M lenses from Leica, Voigtländer, Zeiss and others on this camera. In this article, we’ll be expanding on this greatly, covering Fujifilm X series cameras in general, the various adapter options available and their use as well as looking at the performance and general results of using M lenses on these cameras. We’ll be using the Fujifilm X-T1 camera for this article, along with M lenses from the top three manufacturers. Everything from the Leica Noctilux-M 50mm f/0.95 ASPH to the Voigtländer Color Skopar LTM and Zeiss ZM lenses. Why are we talking about Fujifilm cameras? Well, much to Leica Camera’s chagrin, it’s a capable platform that appeals to many with a cost and feature set that’s hard to ignore. And while we’re a Leica oriented website – we’re not a Leica owned website. We’re unbiased here, and free to discuss any and all things relating to Leica, even mixing brands interchangeably. Remember, we’re about photography here, not brand loyalty. So it it fits into the ecosystem somehow, we’re cool with it. When it comes to adapters, there are two ways to go about using M lenses on Fujifilm X cameras. The official way, with the Fujifilm M Mount Adapter (link is external) – or the third-party way. Every adapter does the same, essential thing – converting the M lens bayonet at the rear of the lens to the X mount bayonet. The Fujifilm option stands out as the only electronic solution, which is good and bad, having some compatibility issues. Third-party adapters come in two flavors, both of which are non-electronic……..

See on lavidaleica.com

Using the Fujifilm X-E1 With Leica Lenses: A Massive Dose of M Magic
at a Fraction of the Price | Michael Evans

Over the past couple of years there has been enormous interest in using manual focus lenses on the new technically advanced mirrorless cameras such as the Sony NEX–7 and Fujifilm X-Pro1. So when Fujifilm announced the new X-E1 at Photokina I was keen to see how it would handle with Leica glass. The Fujifilm X-Pro1, introduced a year ago, is the most Leica-like of all mirrorless cameras thanks to its retro styling and the advanced hybrid viewfinder. This offers a large, bright optical viewfinder coupled with a 1.44MP LED, swappable at the flick of a switch. Unfortunately, the OVF gives no focusing information, unlike Leica’s renowned split-image mechanical focusing system, and the EVF must be selected for manual lens focusing. Buyers who think they are getting a real Leica rangefinder experience, despite the camera’s seductive appearance, will be disappointed. A year later Fujifilm has introduced the X-E1, a smaller, cheaper camera with the same APS-C sensor but lacking the hybrid viewfiner. Instead, the internal electronic viewfinder has been upgraded to a massively capable 2.36MP OLED device that, for the first time, makes manual focusing a real pleasure. Furthermore, by dispensing with the complicated and expensive hybrid, Fujifilm has managed to slash the price dramatically. This is less than the cost of a good second-hand Leica M6 film camera. The new Fujifilm is in many ways a superior product to last year’s complicated X-Pro1. I have been lucky enough to get my hands one of the first X-E1s to hit the British market and have been trying it with five Leica manual focus lenses. The results are astoundingly good, much better than I expected. This is perhaps the best and most accomplished non-Leica camera for Leica glass we have yet seen. It is also an outstanding mirrorless camera in its own right. This is not a full review of the X-E1 and I make no comments on image quality, although it is excellent. I will leave that to those better qualified. Instead, it covers my experiences over the past week in just one area: Handling with Leica lenses….

See more on the.me

Fuji X-E1 Impressions: Using with Leica lenses | Mike Evans

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

 
Over the past couple of years there has been enormous interest in using manual-focus lenses on the new technically advanced mirrorless cameras such as the Sony NEX–7 and [amazon_link id=“B006UV6YMQ“ target=“_blank“ container=““ container_class=““ ]Fuji’s X-Pro 1[/amazon_link]. So when Fuji announced the new [amazon_link id=“B0092MD5V8″ target=“_blank“ container=““ container_class=““ ]X-E1[/amazon_link] at Photokina I was keen to see how it would handle with Leica glass. The [amazon_link id=“B006UV6YMQ“ target=“_blank“ container=““ container_class=““ ]Fuji X-Pro[/amazon_link], introduced a year ago, is the most Leica-like of all mirrorless cameras thanks to its retro styling and the advanced hybrid viewfinder. This offers a large, bright optical viewfinder coupled with a 1.44 megapixel LED, swappable at the flick of a switch. Unfortunately, the OVF gives no focusing information, unlike Leica’s renowned split-image mechanical focusing system, and the EVF must be selected for manual-lens focusing. Buyers who think they are getting a real Leica rangefinder experience, despite the camera’s seductive appearance, will be disappointed. A year later and Fuji has introduced the [amazon_link id=“B0092MD5V8″ target=“_blank“ container=““ container_class=““ ]X-E1[/amazon_link] a smaller, cheaper camera with the same APS-C sensor but lacking the hybrid viewfiner. Instead, the internal electronic viewfinder has been upgraded to a massively capable 2.36 megapixel OLED device that, for the first time, makes manual focusing a real pleasure. Furthermore, by dispensing with the complicated and expensive hybrid, Fuji has managed to slash the price dramatically to just £729 for the body. This is less than the cost of a good second-hand Leica M6 film camera…
 
See on www.lukor.net

On my way to “The Cruise 2012″ & Testing Fuji X-Pro 1 with
60 Hexanon 1.2 | STEVE HUFF PHOTOS

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

 
So what did I bring along with me? Well, since Fuji is releasing the hot new X-Pro 1 firmware next week I rented an X-Pro 1, 35 1.4 and Leica adapter. I want to give the Fuji another shot because last week I met up with Ashwin Rao for dinner in Phoenix and when I shot with his X-pro 1 it seemed much quicker than when I had one for review due to the last firmware update Fuji put out. I also never did get to test the M adapter so I can now do this. Todd has some amazing Leica glass so maybe he can let me use a lens or two for review purposes..hint hint :-)
 
See on www.stevehuffphoto.com

Random Shots from a Time When I was in Toronto | John Smith

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

 

All photos were shot with the Fujifilm X-Pro1 at ISO ratings between 800 and 6400. Shots were done with the Fujinon 35mm f1.4, Voigtlander 25mm f4 Color Skopar, Leica (Leitz) 50mm f2 Summacron and the Leica (Leitz) 90mm f2.8 Tele-Elmarit. My entire kit can fit in a jacket pocket. That is liberation!

See on johnsmith-johnsimages.blogspot.ca

Fujifilm launches M-mount adapter for X-Pro1’s X-mount: Digital Photography Review

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

Fujifilm has officially unveiled its promised adapter to allow the use of Leica M-mount lenses on the X-Pro1. Unlike third-party adapters, but in a similar manner to the Ricoh GXR Mount A12, it’s capable of storing up to six user-created lens profiles to correct distortion, vignetting and corner colour shading, which can be recalled by pressing a Function button on the side of the adapter. The camera can show framelines in its unique hybrid viewfinder for 21mm, 24mm, 28mm, and 35mm lenses (though not, oddly, for 50mm). For other focal lengths the camera’s electronic viewfinder or rear screen will show a preview with 100% coverage of the field of view. To make full use of the adapter, a firmware update for the X-Pro1 (version 1.10) will be made available in June 2012.
See on www.dpreview.com

Is the Fuji X-Pro 1 and 35mm Lens as Good as a Leica? | Joe Marquez

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

However, the reason I pose this question is I have received a number of comments and emails indicating there is a Leica-like look to a few of my Fuji X-Pro 1 images with the 35/1.4 lens. Perhaps it is the shallow depth of field or perhaps the sharpness wide open or perhaps my black and white conversions. Who knows? I have only shot with a Leica M9 a handful of times so I am ill-prepared to answer the question. I enjoyed my M9 experience: fun camera, great images and of course it is quite exhilarating walking around with over ten grand of german-made camera equipment in a half-filled camera bag.

See on www.thesmokingcamera.com