manual focusing

Understanding AF and MF: focusing aids tested | Ming Thein

Right after the question of ‘what X should I buy?’ comes ‘how do you manually focus your lenses?’ in popularity. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to dismiss everything under the sufficiency banner; contrary to the trends in image quality, we’ve gone the opposite direction away from sufficiency. There used to be a time when viewfinders were actually very good for acquiring focus manually; there was no choice because there was simply no other way to focus, either. That required a few things: firstly, a focusing screen with adequate coarseness (sometimes also referred to as ‘snap’); the same distance between flange and focusing screen and flange and imaging plane; adequate magnification, and fast lenses – to compensate for the coarseness of the focusing screen making it somewhat dark. Looking through the viewfinder of an F2 or a Hasselblad is a revelation compared to the drinking straws of modern finders. It seems we barely have the latter these days. So what can we do? ……

Source: blog.mingthein.com
 


Fuji X-T1 Graphite Silver

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COMMENT: AF+MF Mode Update on X-Pro1 and X-T1 | Jeff Carter

….When using AF to select the point of focus it is critical when using the fast aperture lenses such as the 35mm f1.4 and 56mm f1.2 that the focus point is checked to make sure the focus is spot on. By keeping the shutter release half pressed you can use manual focus to fine tune before fully pressing the release to take the shot. Using the Electronic View Finder (EVF) and Focus Peaking you can easily see where the focus needs to be adjusted if necessary. Now on the X-T1 the camera will ‚Focus Zoom‘ where the viewfinder automatically zooms in on the focus area so you can really see the focus point when using a very wide aperture. The X-Pro1 doesn’t have this ‚Focus Zoom‘ function and this has its plus and minus points. I will explain. When I use AF I sometimes point the AF point at the part of the image I want to the focus to be on, half press the shutter release to lock the focus and then recompose in the viewfinder. Now with the X-Pro1 this is still possible because you can see the whole image in the viewfinder. However on the X-T1 when the shutter is half pressed the Focus Zoom operates and you can’t see the whole picture, so my normal method of working is no longer permissible when using the AF+MF mode…….

Source: macleancomms.blogspot.de
 


Fuji X-Pro1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fuji focus tweaks – The X-Pro1 at work | Don Craig


 
While shooting at a recent press conference, I realized that I have made some adjustments to how I focus the X-P1. So, along with adding the latest firmware updates to my Fuji X-Pro1 and XF lenses, I have also updated my focusing technique slightly to speed up automated Manual Focus. Normally while shooting in MF, I use the AF-L button to quickly focus on the subject and then hit the command dial to zoom in on the focus area. In this view, I adjust the focus by manually rotating the lens focus ring. This works well enough, but I have found with the 60mm lens in particular, the initial attempt to focus, especially using the OVF, can take longer than I would like. A faster way to use this technique seems to be to reverse the focusing operation. First I hit the command dial for the zoomed preview of the area I want to be in focus and then I hit the AF-L button. The camera, again particularly with the longer focal length of the 60mm lens, snaps onto focus quickly and consistently. Then I can half-press the shutter release or hit the command dial to return to the normal view for composing and shooting. I was also using the X-100 during the event and this technique worked with it as well. Great to have both Fuji cameras to shoot work events, particularly with available light. Thank you Fuji for producing such great, fast lenses. But don’t you think it’s time to release the 23mm and long zoom? I do!!!

See on doncraigphoto.wordpress.com

Manual Focusing with AF Camera Systems | Carl Zeiss

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

Superb image quality in today’s world of photography is fostered by a whole host of different factors such as the high numbers of pixels in digital SLR cameras, large format sensors in full-frame 35mm format or traditional almost-medium format, intelligent image processing techniques and noise reduction algorithms. The results are also dependent on how the camera interacts with the lens, which is why high-grade optics have such a vital role to play in fulfilling photographers’ increasingly sophisticated demands with regard to image quality.
 
The weakest link

Achieving top-quality shots with high-resolution cameras means keeping all the parameters that have a direct or indirect impact on image quality within strict boundaries. The idea that “a chain is only as strong as its weakest link” has particular relevance for photography and image reproduction.
 
Precision focusing

One of the key links in the chain of successful image rendering is the precision with which the lens focuses on the main subject. Generally speaking, a photographic lens only provides optimum rendering at maximum image quality of a two-dimensional plain. This plain runs exactly in parallel to the film or sensor in the camera. Depending on the magnification and the selected aperture, a certain range both in front of and behind the point of optimum focus is also considered to be „adequately sharp“. In this context, the magnification refers to the ratio between the image produced by the lens and the object being photographed. Thus, the focal length of the lens, the shooting distance and the size of the film or sensor are responsible for the so-called depth of field. The focusing region designated as the depth of field is the extent of the range in the object space of an imaging optical system. This region is rendered in acceptably sharp focus on the focal plane…..
 
See on lenses.zeiss.com

Manual Focus Lenses | Fuji X-Pro1 | Adam J Piper

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

Learn the fastest way to manual focus with your Fuji X-Pro1 using mount adapters and the OVF (optical viewfinder).

See on www.youtube.com

First impression Fuji X-Pro1 with Firmware V2.0 | Korean Website

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

 

Speedtest AF V1.11 and V2.00 35mm and 60mm
manual focus, savespeed, Imageplay …

See on www.popco.net

Manual focus technique | Yanidel Street Photography

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

The main characteristic of rangefinder cameras like the Leica M’s is that they are manual focus. It might sound awkward as autofocus is nowadays a basic feature of even the cheapest compact cameras, yet manual focus does bring some clear advantage in my opinion.
See on www.yanidel.net

X-Pro1 EVF Manual Focusing Technique | markdphotoguy on youtube

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

This is a very quick (read: low production value) video showing a focusing technique for the X-Pro 1 when using the EVF for manual focusing.

Using the EVF on the X-Pro 1 you can use the tendency of the EVF to show aliasing on curved and diagonal lines as well as moire on patterns to act as a kind of focus peaking. It would be nice if Fujifilm adds focus peaking on a future firmware update (after all sony did it) but until then this little technique works like a charm. Please note that this aliasing and moire don’t show up in the image they are natural consequences of the resolution in the electronic viewfinder. The aliasing and moire can also be seen and used on the LCD on the back of the camera when manually focusing.
See on www.youtube.com

Manual focus lens to Fujifilm XPro1 mount adapter | Japan Exposures

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

MADE IN JAPAN quality precision adapter that allows mounting of various rangefinder and SLR mount lenses on the Fujifilm XPro1 mount camera.

 

The following lens mounts are available:

Leica M, Nikon F,Contax/Yashica, Canon FD, Pentax K, Olympus OM, M42, Leica R, Exakta

 

via http://www.japanexposures.com/shop/product_info.php?products_id=512
See on www.japanexposures.com

Manual Focus and Monochrome setting: Fuji X-Pro 1
Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 (test) | Soe Lin

See on Scoop.itFuji X-Pro1

Manual Focus:
Don’t expect manual focus experience to be like a rangefinder. It’s nothing like it. If anything, it’s similar to focusing manually on a m43 camera with an autofocus lens. In other words, it’s no better (but not worse) than manually focusing on other mirrorless cameras—well, focus peaking assist would have been great to have.
See on www.flickr.com

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