Reviews

Fujifilm X-E2 REVIEW | Skyler Burt

We purchased a Fujifilm X-E2 recently, mainly because we liked the Fujifilm X-E1 so much, that we wanted to have two of these badass cameras for when we travel or shoot food. The two cameras are so very similar, you can’t really tell them apart whether by looks or specs. So I find it a little difficult to say anything more than my previous review of the Fujifilm X-E1. Originally, I thought of doing a comparison like when I pitted the Fujifilm X-E1 against Canon’s 5DMKII and 7D. I wanted to try to beat that very unscientific post, by doing and even more unscientific post. I wanted to compare the Fujifilm X-E2 with a completely ridiculous contender the Mamiya 645 AFDII with a ZD Digital Back. Alas, I’m having some CF card issues with the Mamiya (as it’s 10 years old) so that idea was tossed. So what am I going to talk about now, you ask? Well, since Fujifilm has put out a new camera that is basically the same as it’s predecessor, I’ll have to expound on more of the same, which is surprisingly good……….

Source: weeattogether.com
 


Fuji X-E2

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Das Carl Zeiss Distagon 35mm f1.4 ZM | Mehrdad Samak-Abedi

Auf der Photokina 2014 kündigte die Carl Zeiss AG das Distagon 35mm f1.4 ZM für das Leica Bajonett an. Bei einem Straßenpreis von knapp 2000 Euro kann man es nicht unbedingt als Schnäppchen bezeichnen, jedoch ist es recht offensichtlich, welchen Kundenkreis Carl Zeiss mit diesem Objektiv ansprechen will. Vergleicht man das Distagon mit seinem Leica Pendant, das Summilux 35mm (ca. 4500 Euro), sieht das mit dem Schnäppchen schon ganz anders aus. Wie immer ist das eine Frage des Standpunktes. Ich gehöre zur ersten Gruppe, also zu der, die das nicht als ein Schnäppchen sehen und eher mit Objektiven vergleichen, die preislich weiter unten angesiedelt sind. Aktuell fällt mir da im Moment nur das Voigtländer  35mm f1.2 Nokton II oder das sehr charaktervolle Voigtländer 35mm f1.4 Nokton ein. Das Nokton II habe ich von einem Fotofreund derzeit geliehen bekommen, aber bitte erwartet hier keine Vergleiche, ich komme derzeit nicht so zum Ausprobieren des selben. Hier soll es aber eh nur um das Distagon gehen. Und bevor ich das vergesse zu erwähnen: Ich bin kein Technikfreak, will sagen: Das ist hier ist ein Nutzer-Erfahrungsbericht. Ich verliere mich hier weniger in technischen Details (ganz einfach, weil ich davon auch viel zu wenig Ahnung habe, aber psssst!!) als mehr in aus dem Fotoalltag gewonnenen Erkenntnissen…….

Source: www.qimago.de
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Leica M60 Edition Review: Gorgeous steel-grey retro pushes
all the right buttons | Mike Evans

Leica’s M60 Edition is truly an object of desire. It celebrates the golden jubilee of the the M3, the first Leica with a combined viewfinder and rangefinder in one window, and comes in the form of the all-steel but very oddball version of the M Type 240. I’ve had the good fortune to borrow one for review from my friends at Red Dot Cameras in London. The M60 isn’t a camera for the faint of heart or the loose of purse. It costs all of £12,000 but comes in a tremendously impressive and commodious presentation case, together with an exquisitely crafted grey leather half case and strap. This is just as well, because Leica forgot to equip this costly commodity with strap lugs. To compensate for this omission you get the case and strap—plus a pair of white fondling gloves. For your £12k you receive a smooth, shiny steel version of the M240 together with a unique steel-finished version of the legendary 35mm Summilux ASPH lens. I like to think of it as the Steelilux. The price doesn’t seem quite so daunting when you compare this rig with a standard camera and lens. Choose off-the-shelf stuff instead and you are still in for more than £9,000. The premium isn’t totally ridiculous. In fact, in comparison with some previous Leica editions, the M60 is a positive bargain………

Source: macfilos.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

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Why I love and hate my Fujifilm X-T1 | In Babzowski’s Eye

Recently, I made a round the world trip with my wife and my 2yo boy. Not an adventurous one, more like a long tourist travel (it’s hard to really backpack with a baby). I new this travel would be an awesome opportunity for me to get incredible photos. So, I made a big decision, after long months of reflection: I sold my Canon 5DmkII and all my gear, to buy a Fujifilm X-T1. I’m gonna explain you how PM2S (aka Fujifilm France, Belgium and Luxembourg Customer Care) refused to repair my under warranty Fuji X-T1 and sent me a 700€ quotation. Since October, they didn’t answer any of my email, tweet, Facebook private or public message. I even contacted M. ABUAF, head of Camera Products at Fujifilm France, and got no answer from him neither. I own a Fuji X100s since the release day. This is my best photo gear investment. So I decided to buy the X-T1 at it’s first day of release, blinded eyes. I have to be clear with on point before I go further: i LOVE this camera. I love the photos it produces (that’s the most important), I love how it feels in the hands, and I love how it looks a good travel camera… or at least I thought so. Because, after only 2 months of travel in New Zealand and Australia, the problems began…….

Source: babzowski.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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16-55mm f/2.8 vs. 18-55mm f/2.8-4 vs. 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 | Fuji vs. Fuji

The pro standard zoom has long been a staple in almost every pro photographer’s bag. They are intended to be workhorses that can take anything we can throw at them. Low light, inclement weather, fast-moving subjects, you name it. At long last, Fuji’s standard f/2.8 zoom is available, which, along with the 50-140mm f/2.8 fills the two biggest gaps in their lens lineup. We could achieve these focal lengths before, but never with a constant aperture, and outside of 18mm, never at a maximum aperture of f/2.8. This piece will explore in-depth what you get for your extra money, aside from more size and weight…….

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8

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18-135mm vs. 50-140mm vs. 55-200mm | Fuji vs. Fuji

With the advent of the 50-140mm f/2.8, Fuji X-Series owners now have 3 ways of reaching beyond 200mm in 35mm equivalence. The first two releases—Fuji’s FUJINON XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS and FUJINON XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS WR—are both geared more towards the casual shooter. Fuji’s latest telephoto zoom offering—complete with premium-looking Red XF Zoom Badge—is the 50-140mm f/2.8, and has a significantly more “pro” feel to it. As we’ll see, this is a common theme for these three lenses, and should serve as an easy way for readers to decide which lens is best for them……

Source: www.fujivsfuji.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

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Fujifilm 16-55mm f2.8 review | Cameralabs

The Fujinon XF 16-55mm f2.8 is a high-end general-purpose zoom lens for Fujifilm’s range of X-mount mirrorless cameras. Announced in January 2015, it’s the third standard zoom for the X series, following the XF 18-55mm f2.8-4 kit zoom and the more recent XF 18-135mm f3.5-5.6. Mounted on an X-series body, the XF 16-55mm delivers a useful general-purpose range that starts at an equivalent of 24mm for wide-angle coverage and ends at a short telephoto equivalent of 83mm that’s ideal for details or portraits. It features a constant f2.8 focal ratio throughout the optical range and the benefit of weather-sealing, making it the ideal partner for the rugged XT1 body. It also complements the existing XF 50-140mm which shares a constant f2.8 focal ratio and weather sealing. Strangely absent from the XF 16-55mm f2.8 though is optical stabilization, omitted to achieve the best image quality and 24mm equivalent coverage. I understand Fuji’s reasons, but the decision will inevitably turn some potential buyers towards the cheaper XF 18-55mm or the broader XF 18-135mm. There are of course other pros and cons to all three models and in my review I’ll help you make the right choice for your needs and budget. Since so many reviews will directly compare these general-purpose options, I thought I’d also include some comparisons with the ultra-wide XF 10-24mm which shares a range of focal lengths……..

Source: www.cameralabs.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8

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Closer – An MCEX-11 review | Jonas Rask

Not a macro photographer, not a macro photographer, not a macro photographer. But I need to try this! Thats me in a nutshell. My disciplin prohibits, but my curiosity prevails. I guess this is a good thing, since expansion of skills is valuable to an extent. Whats great about todays photography world is that tech gives you limitless options. There’s an easy-to-grab way for every need, style and imagination. Always a bit annoyed with the close-focus distance of many of my Fujinon lenses, though not as bad as the old Leica/Voigtlander rangefinder lenses, I saw the focus charts and thought this would be fun to try out. Little did I know, that this little tube would make my lenses so incredibly versatile. The MCEX-11…….

Source: jonasraskphotography.com
 


Fuji MCEX-11 macro extension

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Love is the Fuji 35mm 1.4 | Richard Wood

Ok so from the title of the blog you can probably surmise that I have a bit of a thing for the 35mm 1.4 from Fuji, guess I’d better tell you why. I’ve had the 35mm (53mm equivalent.) since late November 2014 when Fuji UK sent me a demo model and it’s given me the chance to put it through it’s paces as a portrait lens on the X-T1. The lens like all of the Fuji range is very well made and to compliment the lens construction Fuji provides a metal hood that with it’s rectangular shape has divided opinion – personally I love it, I think it makes the setup very cool looking with a nod to the kind of design that were available on vintage Leica & Voightlander glass. The aperture ring has a nice click to it and the manual focus is smooth, however being one of the elder statesman of the Fuji lens lineup it can when used in autofocus mode hunt around now and again and sometimes fail to achieve focus in very low light conditions. However for the vast majority of normal shooting it is fast and silent……

Source: richardwoodphotographer.blogspot.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 35mm F1.4

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Q+A: Fuji X on Assignment | David duChemin

You’d be amazed how many emails and comments I get that begin with the words, “I know you don’t like gear questions, but…” So to be clear, I don’t mind gear questions at all. I just don’t know why people think I’m the best person to answer them. I like gear. Hell, I LOVE some of my gear. But I ask of it some very specific, and limited things, and some of the people asking some of the questions are looking for a tool that can do the things that they themselves should be doing. Or maybe they’re looking for a justification to buy a new toy that maybe, just maybe, has the Un-Suck Filter. They don’t. My Fujis don’t, and neither do my Leicas or Nikons.  What I want my cameras to do is get out of the way as quickly as possible and let me do my job. So with that in mind, a few responses to some very sensible questions (I’ll spare you the non-sensical questions like: Should I get a Fuji? No one can answer that for you. Fuji. Leica. Nikon. Canon. All of them will make incredible photographs as easily as truly bad ones.)……

Source: davidduchemin.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2

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