Reviews

Fujifilm X100T Hands-on Review | Kai Wong

 
The X100T is the third iteration of the ever-popular X100 series of cameras from Fuji – an APS-C sensor compact camera with retro-chic looks – and the successor to the X100S. But what?s new and is this a worthy upgrade? The team went to the Occupy Central protests to test out the camera……

Source: www.youtube.com

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Fuji Xt1 six months on | Nick Lukey

Six months into using the Fuji Xt1, I thought I would update my initital review. Over the years I have used nearly every Nikon model from film through to digital, my last Nikon was the D3, a truly superb bit of engineering, and a very well thought out camera. After 4 years of ownership I was becoming tired of it, not only down to the weight of the beast and attached glass, but because I felt the camera was owning me and not the other way around. I felt my photography was being done by the camera, with very little input from me. I wanted to be inspired again, remove myself somewhat from the electronics. Hard to believe this camera appeared in the Uk late 2007. So my journey of re discovering my photography came through the purchase of the Fuji x100, yes that bloody quirky camera !, that little camera delivered superb images, set me on the Fuji path. Given my photographic needs I followed up that purchase with the Fuji X pro 1, and started to aquire some lenses. The 55-200, and the 14mm, along with some legacy glass from Olympus zuiko. Still I felt for some professional assignments where speed was required the Fuji’s were a little lacking. Though image quality had never been an issue. So when the Xt1 was announced I jumped for joy, no more carrying the D3 around for that moment when a little action occurred. I can now honestly shoot a portrait session or wedding day without worry….

Source: www.thebigpicturegallery.com

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Leica M | Mehrdad Samak-Abedi

Ich kenne keinen anderen Kamerahersteller, der soviele Fans und Bewunderer hat wie Leica. Genauso gibt es zahlreiche Fotografen, die Leica Kameras nicht leiden mögen, teils weil sie aus Erfahrungen schöpfen, teils weil ihnen die Firma und ihre ganze Preis- und/oder Imagepolitik auf die Nerven geht. Hüben wie drüben sind die Gründe jedenfalls zahlreich. Eines ist jedoch all denen, die Fotografie auch nur ein wenig über den „grünen A-Modus“ hinaus betreiben, gemein: Jeder hat eine Meinung zu Leica! Unabhängig davon, ob er oder sie jemals eine Leica in der Hand hatte oder genutzt hat. Alle kennen Leica und sehr viele nennen den Namen mit einer gewissen Bewunderung. Leica ist demnach natürlich auch mir schon seit Beginn meines fotografischen Interesses ein Begriff, aber die Kameras und Objektive aus dem Hause Leica sind einfach finanziell, damals wie heute, weit weg von dem, was ich mir leisten kann/will. Natürlich schürt das auch die Neugier, und das mittlerweile schon seit nunmehr 30 Jahren……

Source: www.qimago.de

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Why Leica (M)? | Steven S. Miric

I don’t know if that has to do anything with the fact that first camera ever I was given to shoot was a rangefinder. Sure, it was a “copy” of the “original”, my Dad’s Russian made Zorki… Chrome  body with 50 lens and full leather case. Smell of that leather I count as one of “the smells from my childhood”. I struggled with that camera to make it in focus. For a teenage kid, rushing to press the shutter button it was unbearable to “wait” and line up that “double image” in the little “window”… But I did it! And I photographed my first celluloid images with that camera… After Zorki, many other cameras came in to my bag, some stayed longer some not. I was a “Canon guy”, then “Nikon guy”, then “Hasselblad  guy”, then “Nikon guy”… You get the picture…….

Source: fotografiainc.zenfolio.com

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Leica Summicron-T 23mm f/2 ASPH | Jim Fisher

Leica chose its first prime lens for the T mirrorless camera system wisely. The Leica Summicron-T 23mm f/2 ASPH. ($1,850) matches the field of view and light gathering capability of the quintessential Leica optic, the 35mm Summicron that has adorned many of its full-frame digital and 35mm rangefinder cameras. This new Summicron is an autofocus lens that covers a smaller APS-C image sensor, but it’s quite compact and can focus closer than its M-mount cousins. And, while it doesn’t deliver quite the impeccable performance that its price would dictate, it’s a solid prime lens option for the T system, and one that does a better job capturing images with a shallow depth of field than the Vario-Elmar-T 18-56mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom that is also available for the T……

Source: www.pcmag.com

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Leica Summicron 75mm f2 APO | Matthew Osborne

Without doubt my biggest frustration with the Leica M cameras is the rangefinder focus system only focusing as close as 0.7M. After coming from a Nikon D800 DSLR camera I was used to working very close to my subjects to either create a shallow depth of field and/ or to crop tight to improve my composition. I now have some nice Leica M lenses but I never seem to be able to get as close as I would like. I can get shallow DOF with lenses like the Leica Noctilux 50mm f1.0 and Leica Summicron 90mm f2 but both these lenses only focus as close as 1M. My closest focusing lenses are the Leica Summilux ASPH 50mm f1.4 and Leica Summicron 50mm f2 both of which focus as 0.7M but that is still not near enough for say detail shots at a wedding…….

Source: mrleica.com

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Review: Fujifilm XF56mmF1.2 R Lens | Krista Michaels

Conclusion:
 
At the end of this quick photo shoot, I knew that Canon was a thing of the past in my life. Fujifilm has won my heart with the X-T1 mirrorless camera body and their superb XF56mmF1.2 R lens. I honestly, at this point, cannot see myself ever going back to a bulky DSLR. I just have no interest any longer, as I’m getting mind-blowing images with my Fuji, and it has, without question, reignited a major passion for the purity of photography that I haven’t felt since I first picked up a camera. I love the X-T1… and I LOVE this lens! Highly recommended! =)

Source: www.kristamichaels.com

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Field testing the Fuji X-T1 | GREG FUNNELL

I’ve spoken before about my love for the Fujifilm x-series cameras. The idea of having a camera that produces good enough quality and usability without having to lug around DSLR really appeals to me, whether for day to day stuff or even on jobs. You can read my thoughts on the x100s and X-Pro1 here. Although I love them as cameras to use day to day I probably wouldn’t be comfortable shooting a commercial gig exclusively on them. I tend to keep them as back-up and also as something to use for myself. However when the Fuji X-T1 came out I was excited that it could be a potentially great set-up for traveling with and shooting editorial assignments – it was much closer to the DSLR setup I’m used to using but without the bulk. With this in mind I decided to take one away with me on some recent assignments to Croatia, Spain, Morocco and Sweden. I already own some x-series lenses (18mm, 35mm) and I was lent a few extra ones (27mm, 56mm, 18-55mm, 23mm) which gave me a fairly thorough set-up……..

Source: focus52.blogspot.de

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Hands-on: Fujifilm X100T review: New viewfinder features make
for best X100 model yet | Pocket-lint

If you’re unfamiliar with the X100 series then get prepared to geek out. If you already know all about it then get prepared to be blown away by the Fujifilm X100T – because it’s the best X100 model yet. The reason is simple: the X100T brings an updated viewfinder, complete with parallax correction in manual focus and what the company is calling an “electronic rangefinder” feature too. And it’s utterly brilliant. In terms of build, the X100T is the same fine example of craftsmanship as the previous X100S and original X100 models. There’s not much we can say to better our previous thoughts on that – this silver-colour, magnesium alloy construction is solid in both visual and physical terms. If, that is, you like retro styling and the old school of thought when shooting, because the X100T has manual control dials and a fixed 23mm (which is a 35mm equivalent) f/2.0 aperture lens. No zoom to be found here. That’s a staple of the X100 series though and it restricts working practice in a kind of beautiful way. The quality is the same tried and tested optical performance as in its predecessors, as is the APS-C sized 16-megapixel X-Trans II CMOS sensor……

Source: www.pocket-lint.com

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Review and Samples of Fujifilm XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS Lens |
Derek Olsen

Verdict:

I give this lens 4 out of 5 stars. I enjoyed my time with this lens but I’m going to sell it for something more compact and less bulky (*see UPDATE 1). It’s a little awkwardly weighted on the XE-2 and I found myself shooting only within the 10mm – 14mm range 80% of the time. So I’m purchasing the Zeiss 12mm f/2.8 Touit * — a nice middle ground that will take up less space in my bag. The Fujifilm 10-24mm f/4 is a high-quality lens that could definitely pass for certain professional uses but perhaps not for huge fine-art prints (though that’s up for debate). While compiling the photos for this review I almost convinced myself to keep the lens! If you don’t mind the extra weight and size or f/4 aperture, this is is fantastic purchase……..

Source: www.derekolsonphotography.com

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