Reviews

Fuji X-T1 – The perfect travel camera? | Where’s Wheels

As a photography enthusiast I get asked from a lot people which camera they should buy. Often they are buying a new camera because they are traveling and want to document the trip. Is there such a thing as the perfect travel camera for everyone? No I don’t really think so. Everyones needs and budgets are different. I’m going to write a few of these posts to give you some options. For the first post though I’m going to tell you what I use and what I recommend for someone who has a larger budget and is really dedicated to taking more than just snapshots on their trip. Since I was a teen traveling with my parents until recently I’ve always used the same general type of camera system. That is a Nikon SLR of some kind and a few lenses. Now of course over the years I made the move from film to digital but the setup was mostly always the same. Mostly recently this was a Nikon D600  Always an SLR with a wide angle zoom as well as a 50mm and a longer lens, often my 105mm if I felt the need to bring it for whatever reason.  Of course this was never a light system to carry but the image quality it provided always seemed worth the trouble…….

Source: www.whereswheels.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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Fujifilm X-E2 Review – Hands On Review | Gabriel Malachi Ajose

Welcome to this review of my ‘dynamic duo’. I wanted the review to be organic, realistic and useful for photographers. This won’t be a large list of technical specifications, but rather, this review is on using the camera and how it performs. Here goes… It’s important to note that I wrote this review before the December firmware release and I added the 35 mm section after the release. One of the thing’s that I love about the Fujifilm community, is that they listen to their buyers. If something isn’t great with the current firmware they endeavour to fix it within the next update. As a photographer this is important, it makes you feel like your opinion is valued, and it makes for a better user experience. I used to shoot with a Canon 5D Mark II and Canon 5D. I used Canon as it produced the images that I wanted at the time. As a photographer I purposefully stay away from the gear hype and ‘Canon v Nikon’ wars. If a camera company produces something that meets my requirements, I’m going to invest in it, despite the brand……

Source: www.malachiajose.com
 


Fuji X-E2

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Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS – Review / Test Report | PhotoZone

Verdict

If you read our analysis so far, you may have noticed a few negative findings but this has to be seen in a context. Ultra-wide lenses are never flawless and the Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS is actually one of the best representative of its species. It is very sharp in the image center and the border- and corner quality is very decent. Lateral chromatic aberrations are also low. Yes, image distortion and vignetting can be very noticeable at the extreme wide end but most users will probably take advantage of image auto-correction here anyway. In terms of build quality, we are highly impressed. Fujinon lenses are better than most here anyway but Fujifilm has reached a new level here. However, even so it is a bit disappointing that they didn’t provide weather sealing. While it isn’t something unusual anymore, we certainly appreciate the image stabilizer which actually lifts the low light capabilities of this zoom lens beyond the two ultra-wide prime lenses (Zeiss Touit 12mm f/2.8 and Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R) of the system. If you are still not convinced by now … the author will keep the lens in his private stock. Consequently … highly recommended!

Source: www.photozone.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF10-24mm F4.0

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Fuji X-T1 Graphite Silver Edition Review |What Happens In Vegas… |
SLR Lounge

I’ve had a month with the Fuji system and being only familiar with Canon DSLRs for all of my photographic career, my foray into the mirrorless world was a little bumpy. In fact, part of the time, I was ready to write a slightly scathing review on this little camera. And then came the firmware update, a fashion shoot and a little weekend trip to Las Vegas… Before we begin, what can I say about the X-T1 that hasn’t already been said before? I could give you a list of tech specs, but that you could find not only on the Fuji website, but in a quick Google search. I’ll admit, I was dubious in trying out an entirely new system. I didn’t really care about the technical aspects of the camera (sorry, tech geeks). I was more interested in the image quality, the ease of use and the the overall experience of using a mirrorless system.It seems everyone has an opinion about this camera, and they are mostly complimentary, but is this the right camera for me?……

Source: www.slrlounge.com
 


Fuji X-T1 Graphite Silver

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My Review of the Fujifilm X100T | Antonio M. Rosario

I’m not going to go over all detailed specs of the camera or peep pixels; that you can find elsewhere online. I want to give the feel of the camera and its workings from the point of view of a photographer who is going to use it on a daily basis. What is significant to me: Camera size. Small but not too small. Light but not too light. I can carry it on my shoulder and feel like I’m carrying a camera but it’s not heavy to the point that it’ll bother me carrying it around all day. I like a little heft to my cameras. 16 megapixel sensor. This is good for the kind of shooting I’m planning to do with this camera. I like having the extra megapixels so that I can crop into an image and still have enough data left so I can make a decent sized print. Actual dials for shutter speeds and aperture. This is something I didn’t realize I missed with my Nikon DSLRs. It’s nice having them on the outside of the camera so I can quickly see my exposure setting without having to look at a screen or through the viewfinder……..

Source: amrosario.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Street Photography Camera Review – Fujifilm X100T | John Barbiaux

I’m going to approach this review from a different perspective than my review of the X100S, I’m going to look at this camera from a Street Photographers perspective.  The camera is more than capable of being used for a number of photography disciplines and a quick visit to one of the X100T Flickr pages will give you some great examples of this.  If you’d like to read the full review of the X100S, the previous version of this camera with the exact same image sensor and lens, you can click here. I’m no stranger to the X100 series having started the X100S challenge a couple of years ago (flickr page, X100s Challenge Article). If you read through my various experiences with the X100s over on PhotolisticLife.com you’ll notice I started off thinking the camera was just “another point and shoot” and by the end of the experience I was/am a huge fan of the camera and actually used it as my primary camera for the better part of a year………

Source: decisiveshot.com

John’s free X100T setup guide
http://decisiveshot.com/fujifilm-x100t-setup-guide/
 
 


Fuji X100T

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Fujifilm X100T Full Review with X100s Comparison | Mirrorlessons

The Fujifilm X100T, the third camera in the X100 series, has attracted lots of attention much like its predecessors even if it doesn’t bring as many outstanding upgrades as the second in line, the X100s. This new camera has the same sensor and the same lens as the two first models. For those who already own the X100s, I can come out and say right away that I wouldn’t recommend a switch. However if you are interested in entering the Fujifilm X world for the first time, it is an entirely different story. Specifications aside, the X100T certainly demonstrates the maturity of a camera that in my humble opinion still holds the title of the best product in the X line-up. The X100T is a compact camera. It won’t enter your jean pocket but will fit comfortably inside a coat pocket. My point here is that it is very portable and that is, without a doubt, one of its main advantages, especially when you consider that it includes an APS-C sensor, a fast aperture lens and an advanced viewfinder. The camera has a robust build quality with magnesium alloy parts at the top and bottom. This time I also have concrete proof of its robustness and I’m not just talking about feeling. During my first days with the camera, I accidentally dropped it (first time ever) and it hit the cold tarmac 5cm away from green grass (irony at its best, I guess). As shown in the photo below, the body did suffer some scratches but nothing else. The camera still functions perfectly in every way……..

Source: www.mirrorlessons.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Ibelux 40mm f/0.85 | Max Angeloni

At the times of film photography the film shortcomings were clearly visible in poor lighting conditions. That’s why ultra bright lenses could be an indispensable tool to get enough light to be able to take the picture you wanted. Lenses such as the Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm F/0.7, originally designed for the Apollo space missions and then modified to be used by Stanley Kubrick on Barry LYndon’s candlelight scenes, made the history of photography thanks to its brightness. Talking about photography oriented lenses, Leica’s Noctilux represented a dream for generations of photographers. Talking about reflex lenses, the maximum brightness that you can find is F/1.2. There have been some exceptions, i.e. Canon’s 50mm F/1.0, but the final results were not so exceptional so that Canon itself decided to go back to F/1.2 for the new release of the lens……

Source: www.riflessifotografici.com
 


Ibelux 40 mm f/0.85

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Fujifilm 56mm f/1.2R APD lens review: A serious portrait
prime for serious bokeh | William Brawley

Just when you though the bokeh of the original Fuji 56mm f/1.2 couldn’t get any better, Fujifilm introduced a special version of their portrait prime at Photokina 2014, the Fuji 56mm f/1.2R APD. The “APD” stands for apodization, by which a filter is introduced into the optical path that features a smooth, circular gradation that darkens toward the outer edge. This essentially provides a softer edge to the lens’s aperture and aims to provide smoother out of focus blur, but at the expense of some light transmission. Other than the new APD filter, the optical design and build quality is identical to the original 56mm f/1.2R lens: the same number of aspherical and Extra Low Dispersion elements, and a solid, all-metal barrel construction. Performance of this new version is equally impressive to that of the original model — excellent, sharp images, with very low distortion, CA and vignetting. Does the apodization filter produce better bokeh, or background blur, than the original? It’s a subtle change, and which one is “better” comes down to personal preference, we feel. For all the details, though, head over to SLRgear to read our Fuji 56mm f/1.2R APD review, complete with our in-depth report, final conclusion as well as our full range of test results and sample images, including side-by-side bokeh comparison shots between this and the non-APD 56mm lens…….

Source: www.imaging-resource.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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Fujinon X Lens: Primes – Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD (Tested) |
William Brawley

Just when you though the bokeh of the original Fuji 56mm ƒ/1.2 couldn’t get any better, Fujifilm introduced a special version of their portrait prime at Photokina 2014, the 56mm ƒ/1.2R APD. The “APD” stands for apodization, by which a filter is introduced into the optical path that features a smooth, circular gradation that darkens toward the outer edge. This essentially provides a softer edge to the lens’s aperture and promises to provide smoother out of focus blur, but at the expense of some light transmission. Other than the new APD filter, the optical design and build quality is identical to the original 56mm ƒ/1.2R lens: the same number of aspherical and Extra Low Dispersion elements, and a solid, all-metal barrel construction. Like the non-APD model, this 56mm lens ships with a lens hood, soft pouch and front/rear caps. The APD model, however, also ships with a Fujifilm ND8 (3-stop ND) filter. Seeing as this lens’s main purpose is to be shot at wide apertures for maximum bokeh effect — and indeed, the APD filter works best at very wide apertures — Fuji thoughtfully includes the ND filter to help shoot wide-open in brightly lit conditions……..

Source: slrgear.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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