Reviews

Ibelux 40mm f/0.85 | Max Angeloni

At the times of film photography the film shortcomings were clearly visible in poor lighting conditions. That’s why ultra bright lenses could be an indispensable tool to get enough light to be able to take the picture you wanted. Lenses such as the Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm F/0.7, originally designed for the Apollo space missions and then modified to be used by Stanley Kubrick on Barry LYndon’s candlelight scenes, made the history of photography thanks to its brightness. Talking about photography oriented lenses, Leica’s Noctilux represented a dream for generations of photographers. Talking about reflex lenses, the maximum brightness that you can find is F/1.2. There have been some exceptions, i.e. Canon’s 50mm F/1.0, but the final results were not so exceptional so that Canon itself decided to go back to F/1.2 for the new release of the lens……

Source: www.riflessifotografici.com
 


Ibelux 40 mm f/0.85

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Fujifilm 56mm f/1.2R APD lens review: A serious portrait
prime for serious bokeh | William Brawley

Just when you though the bokeh of the original Fuji 56mm f/1.2 couldn’t get any better, Fujifilm introduced a special version of their portrait prime at Photokina 2014, the Fuji 56mm f/1.2R APD. The “APD” stands for apodization, by which a filter is introduced into the optical path that features a smooth, circular gradation that darkens toward the outer edge. This essentially provides a softer edge to the lens’s aperture and aims to provide smoother out of focus blur, but at the expense of some light transmission. Other than the new APD filter, the optical design and build quality is identical to the original 56mm f/1.2R lens: the same number of aspherical and Extra Low Dispersion elements, and a solid, all-metal barrel construction. Performance of this new version is equally impressive to that of the original model — excellent, sharp images, with very low distortion, CA and vignetting. Does the apodization filter produce better bokeh, or background blur, than the original? It’s a subtle change, and which one is “better” comes down to personal preference, we feel. For all the details, though, head over to SLRgear to read our Fuji 56mm f/1.2R APD review, complete with our in-depth report, final conclusion as well as our full range of test results and sample images, including side-by-side bokeh comparison shots between this and the non-APD 56mm lens…….

Source: www.imaging-resource.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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Fujinon X Lens: Primes – Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD (Tested) |
William Brawley

Just when you though the bokeh of the original Fuji 56mm ƒ/1.2 couldn’t get any better, Fujifilm introduced a special version of their portrait prime at Photokina 2014, the 56mm ƒ/1.2R APD. The “APD” stands for apodization, by which a filter is introduced into the optical path that features a smooth, circular gradation that darkens toward the outer edge. This essentially provides a softer edge to the lens’s aperture and promises to provide smoother out of focus blur, but at the expense of some light transmission. Other than the new APD filter, the optical design and build quality is identical to the original 56mm ƒ/1.2R lens: the same number of aspherical and Extra Low Dispersion elements, and a solid, all-metal barrel construction. Like the non-APD model, this 56mm lens ships with a lens hood, soft pouch and front/rear caps. The APD model, however, also ships with a Fujifilm ND8 (3-stop ND) filter. Seeing as this lens’s main purpose is to be shot at wide apertures for maximum bokeh effect — and indeed, the APD filter works best at very wide apertures — Fuji thoughtfully includes the ND filter to help shoot wide-open in brightly lit conditions……..

Source: slrgear.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 APD

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Fuji 100 Series: Why I will probably not buy an X100T | Bill Palmer

A little background: A couple of years ago, back in 2013, I had my first brush with an X100. At the time the X-E1 was my main camera, and I was thinking that the X100 would be complementary. I struggled with it then, and couldn’t quite work out why but, a couple of months later, I sold it on. Fast forward to just before Christmas this year. With the announcement of the X100T, the X100S could be found at decent prices very lightly used on the secondhand market. That, plus the release of the TCL-X100, made me seriously reconsider. I pulled the trigger twice – on a mint X100 and the teleconverter. I decided to use the X100S to take part in the 2015 “Single in January” picture-a-day activity on the Photographer’s Lounge forum. This is a lighthearted “challenge” to use one camera and one lens for the month to capture and share one photo a day.  I thought that working with it every day would help me to get to grips with the X100S and learn its quirks and foibles; I had done exactly the same back in 2012 with the Ricoh GRDIII. This time, however, it doesn’t seem to be working…….

Source: macfilos.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji 18mm F2 / Lens Review | Colin Nicholls

The Fuji 18mm F2 lens. Often overlooked and pitted for being the ‘worst’ of the X Lens lineup this little, almost pancake lens packs a pretty good punch for it’s size and can be had for a real bargain these days. This review [like all my others] doesn’t focus on charts and such, its real photos I take with this lens, all edited to my style its not so much about the quality and optical characteristics of this lens as it is about the kind of photos you can take with it. That being said this review is image heavy, to the point and will hopefully give you an idea of adding this little beauty to you kit bag will do for you, enjoy……

Source: www.colinnichollsphotography.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18mm F2.0

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Fuji X-T1 Review | Marius Masalar

When I reviewed the X100S, I was just dipping my toes into the Fuji ecosystem. Since then, I’ve had the opportunity to immerse myself entirely and I’d like to share my findings. The X100S served as a pivot point in my photography, and the story of how it came into my life was among the most popular articles on the blog. It revealed a strong desire for non-technical and down-to-earth discussions about camera equipment in my little corner of the internet. As a result, I intend to continue writing about the photo gear that I use, and I figure there’s no better way to kick off the new year than by examining the X100S’ big brother. Over the holidays, I worked almost exclusively with the Fuji X-T1, courtesy of a loan from Fuji Canada.1 Paired with a 10-24mm wide-angle zoom and a 60mm macro prime, this kit has braved the frosty Toronto winter with me, and plunged into the Mexican coastal jungles in pursuit of wildlife and tropical vistas………

Source: mariusmasalar.me
 


Fuji X-T1

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My short and sweet Fuji X100T review | Steve Huff

…..so do I recommend the X100T?

Did it motivate me and push me to get out and shoot? Well, yes it did. Not as much as a Leica but it’s a camera that makes you happy to own it. It is a camera that will reward you with beautiful colors and images. In the right light it can be unstoppable, in the wrong light it can be a bit flat. High ISO performance is pretty much what we had in the X100s. I had some issues with the AF missing its target (using center point) and I had the same overexposure issues that plagued the camera since the version 1 X100. Those who shoot the X100 series usually dials in some negative EVF comp to make up for  the slight overexposure of the cameras metering system. X100T vs Same Price Range. Anything better? For the cost of $1299 I would look into the fabulous and pro level Olympus E-M1 as it is a better camera in every way but size (its a tad larger/thicker) and comes in at $100 less. Of course that is without a lens but man, so many great M 4/3 lenses out there. The E-M1 for me bests all cameras up to full frame where it can not compete but I have yet to use an APS-C or smaller camera that beats out the E-M1 in 90% of situations……..

Source: www.stevehuffphoto.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji X-T1 Review | Richard Wood

To cut a long story short, I never thought that mirrorless cameras would be up to much after years of being conditioned to use and live with massive DSLR’s that only seemed to get bigger and heavier with lenses to match, as that’s what ‘Professional Photographers’ use isn’t it? Well stuff that and with good reason – if you think back at what cameras were used by photojournalists over the years they were things like Rolleiflex TLR’s for sports and that includes Formula 1, Leica’s for news work and SLR’s in the real sense such as Don McCullin and his famous yet diminutive Nikon F. A couple of shoots around Silverstone for the Formula 1 and Touring cars last year, taught me that after getting together a fine array of L lenses and a 5DMK3, all I had really gotten myself was a very real pain in the neck. My 5DMK3’s were about as reliable as a chocolate teapot and I was already on my third body in twelve months (and yes I do look after my kit.) perhaps I was just really unlucky, but it was getting to the point that I couldn’t go to a shoot with the confidence in my gear that I needed. Time for a major change then as after fifteen years of being a Canon user the poor run of luck with the kit coupled with the stellar UK service gave me the kick in the behind that I needed to start looking around for an alternative. Followers of my blog and work will know that I have a soft spot for the Fuji X100, so when I found out about and read up on the X-T1 I got very excited indeed……….

Source: richardwoodphotographer.blogspot.co.uk


Fuji X-T1

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A Closer Look at Fuji’s New Weather-Resistant
XF 16-55mm f/2.8 Lens | Jaron Schneider

Last week at CES, Fuji announced the awaited weather-resistant 16-55mm f/2.8 zoom lens, which they have engineered to inhibit ghosting and flare from edge to edge to appeal to outdoor photographers who will have to battle different and ever-changing qualities of light and the placement of the sun. The XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR uses a light weight Internal Focusing System and a Twin Linear Motor for high-speed autofocus (AF) and whisper quiet AF as fast as 0.06 seconds. When combined with the near-silent shutter sound of the FUJIFILM X-T1, photos can be taken unnoticed in quiet and sensitive locations. The 16-55mm focal range is equivalent to a 24-84mm on a full frame sensor that offers 14 sealing points that makes the lens extremely resistant to water and especially dust. With that 24mm equivalent field of view at the widest, the lens should be pretty useful for outdoor photographers shooting landscapes, but equally useful for something like a portrait when fully extended to the 84mm equivalent……..

Source: resourcemagonline.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8

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The X100T: a review in five pieces | Patrick La Roque

That was me, waxing poetic during the intro of the X100S review almost two years ago. It may have seemed strange to some that a camera, a simple capture device, could elicit such a high level of emotion; but I believe objects can become more than the sum of their parts. These tools can become an extension of ourselves and when they do, something else happens: they inspire us. To this day when I see an X100 I have an almost Pavlovian response, something I can only describe as photographic withdrawal syndrome: it makes me need to shoot. Anything. It also infects me with a serious case of wanderlust, which I imagine is a byproduct of these cameras being my constant travel companions since the very first version hit the scene; I still own that original model with all its beautiful infuriating faults. The X100S was a no-brainer in terms of upgrades: miles ahead in almost every single aspect but form factor which, let’s face it, Fuji nailed on day one. But as great as it was, my close association with Fujifilm Canada as an X Photographer had a strange side effect: I never bought one. I had a review unit for a good while, then I wanted to buy my own but there was no stock available so they graciously sent me another loaner… Then the X-T1 came into the picture … Long story short: eventually it only made sense to wait for the next version which I knew was on the table……..

Source: www.laroquephoto.com
 


Fuji X100T

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