Reviews

Fuji XT1 | Flemming Bo Jensen

….
What I do not like about the Fuji XT1

Design and ergonomics. This is subjective, and in part due to me having big hands and fingers, let me explain:

  • I much prefer the rangefinder design of the X-pro1, black rectangle with a viewfinder on the left side. Just my preference. X-pro1 feels better in my hands and to my eye and face. Give the X-pro1s the X-pro1 body and buttons etc. and XT1 viewfinder, sensor and screen and speed and it will be the X-series masterpiece! (for me).
  • Buttons. Overall, the buttons on the X-pro1 are much easier to operate for me. I find the menu buttons on the XT1 to be near impossible to use, far too recessed.
  • Movie record button, I want to chop this button off. Why is this placed where the iso button is on EVERY other Fuji camera? Please make it customizable.
  • Dials for scene mode and metering. I change these so rarely I do not need dials for this. Especially not buttons that I tend to accidentally change (big fingers) every time I turn the ISO and exposure dials.
  • I use back button focus 80% of the time, manual focus the other 20% and there is a rubber grip thing preventing easy thumb access to the AF-L button (actually the AE-L button would be a lot more suitable for this).
  • I still feel Fuji do not really understand the use of back button focus, the X-pro1 is not optimal for this either, none of the Fuji cameras are (at least with my hands).
  • I really do not like the lock on the iso dial, I want to easily be able to rotate this without taking my eye out of the viewfinder….

See on www.flemmingbojensen.com

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Fuji X-T1 First Impression | Mike Villa

… all that to say, in good light, the X-T1 keeps up very well with DSLR paired with a slower-focusing lens. In poor light, it performs much more like a fairly speedy mirrorless camera. The biggest advantage here over a DSLR? Focusing directly on the sensor means that there are never any lens calibration issues, and it’s far more accurate. Of course, the elephant in the room is focus tracking performance, and Fuji has made a pretty big stink about it. Unfortunately I haven’t had the opportunity to use it much, and so that will have to wait for part two of my review. In terms of image quality, there’s nothing new here. Files look identical to those out of an X-E2, which are very, very similar to the X-E1 and X-Pro1. Fuji colors are fantastic, and the files can handle a good deal of pushing and pulling. The “foliage smearing” that’s well documented on forums is indeed a real thing, but it’s typically extremely minor, and for my work isn’t an issue. If you aren’t familiar with Fuji’s X-mount lenses, you’re missing out. They leave nothing on the table when compared to my Nikon Gs. The first time I used the Fuji 35mm f1.4, I was blown away that a $600 lens could perform that well. Since then, the quality has only improved. Wide open against my Nikkors, every one of the Fuji lenses are sharper that my Nikon equivalent. It’s worth noting that the newer lenses such as the 14mm and 23mm seem to focus quite a bit faster than the older ones like the 18mm and 35mm….

See on www.artoftheimage.blogspot.fr

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Fuji X-T1 Photography | Jim Radcliffe

I have to say this in every “review” I do on any camera. I am not a reviewer.. I am a user. I am an amateur photographer. I do not pixel peep at 300% magnification. I use my cameras to produce photography that I enjoy.. and so this will not be an in-depth review of the nuts and bolts of this camera or all the technical aspects of the camera which, apparently to some, is a driving obsession. I am not obsessed with pixel counts and all the other technical specs you can find on the commercial review sites. I don’t buy gear to test it.. I buy it to use it for myself. And I never ask you to buy a camera through my website by clicking on a link. I have no connection with any camera maker nor do I place ads on my site. We all get enough of that elsewhere. What follows are my opinions and observations and nothing more. I am not an authority. I am just a guy with a deep love for photography. Ok… that’s out of the way…. I bought the Fuji X-Pro 1 the first week it became available. I passed on the X-E1 as it did not offer more than what the X-Pro 1 already provided other than a better EVF. I did not think that the Fuji X-E2 would be enough of an improvement over the X-Pro 1 to warrant its purchase either.  I was wrong. I bought the X-E2 the first week it was available but had I known that Fuji was about to unleash the Fuji X-T1 a few months later I probably would have passed on the X-E2 and waited for the X-T1……

See on www.boxedlight.com

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Fuji XT-1 – Initial Thoughts and Impressions | Steve Galloway

I have had a Fuji XT-1 for nearly 3 weeks now, and have to admit to being completely swept off my feet with this camera. I am a gadget lover, but never try to let the work I do be influenced too heavily by what gear i do or do not have. Wanting to work more location lighting , and not being able to afford portables strobe solutions, I learned how to make the most from small flashes i did have with Chinese import soft boxes. Then as skill, experience and finance available rose, upgrades were made. But the Fuji XT-1…well…that has changed my direction as a photographer. Its not so much the results that are having an affect, yes the fuji jpegs are lovely (never been so frustrated at not being able to use lightroom), but its more the form of the camera that revolutionized the way I’m shooting now. First things first though. I use a Nikon D800. Its a bit of a beast. Its heavy after some use, the lenses are heavy, the file sizes are humongous, but its my perfect camera, a great studio camera, high resolution in a well known and loved Nikon format, that pairs effortlessly with all my best glass, with great video function. But as a work camera, it comes out of the bag as and when a job is needing done, not necessarily when I want to take an image. The Fuji XT-1 is light, super light. It weighs nothing in my bag even with the two primes that i have – the 35mm and the 18mm primes.  It fits nicely in the hand to carry around without it being obtrusive. Which means I always have it on me, which in turn means I always have a camera to hand to create images in a RAW format at a really good resolution. So now I’m back to constantly looking for and creating images……

See on www.photosbygalloway.com

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The first outing with the new Fuji XT-1 | Chuq Von Rospach

As soon as Fuji announced the new XT-1 camera I knew I was going to upgrade it. The feature set seemed to match what I saw of the weaknesses in the XE-1 — which, I should note, is a really good camera. While I felt the XE-1 was a great landscape and street camera, the autofocus, the sometimes laggy shutter and the general responsiveness kept me from thinking about the XE-1 as a camera for use out in the field doing critter or bird photography. This feeling was reinforced one day when I was out in the Merced refuges and the geese were spooked, the camera really struggled to keep up with the action of trying to shoot wide angle images with 15,000 geese chaotically flying around in a panic. Still, when things were slower, I really loved the results…..

See on www.chuqui.com

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No More Excuses – Fuji X-T1 review | Olaf Sztaba

SUMMARY

I have met many photographers who would like to transition from SLRs to the X-series cameras but somehow they are afraid to do so. Part of the reason could be gossip going around the Internet about certain issues such as the AF speed or file processing. Yes, with early Fuji cameras those who wanted to shoot hummingbirds playing hide and seek may well be better off with an SLR. Fortunately, the X-T1 addressed those issues. Another reason could be the unfamiliar look of the Fuji X-Pro1 and X-E1/2 for photographers who are used to shooting with SLR-like cameras. For them, the X-T1 offers a familiar look, superb handling and the best EVF on the market. Most importantly, the “engaging and fun” factor has already far surpassed a traditional SLR. I am confident that if you give the Fuji X-T1 enough time, you will never go back to a traditional SLR. Looking around, there are many photographers who once again find joy in photography by returning to the basics. Fuji proved that a modern camera doesn’t have to be a high-tech mess with a list of functions that have nothing to do with the art of seeing. The appeal of the X-T1 comes from a fusion of classic-style but proved-to-work controls with cutting-edge technology, which complements your photography process rather than complicates it. Try it. After all, there are no more excuses……..

See more pictures on olafphotoblog.com

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Shortest Ever Fujifilm X-T1 Review | Theme

It’s been quite a ride for the Fujifilm X series so far. Launched in March two years ago with the groundbreaking X-Pro1, the family of X cameras seems to grow faster than any of the competitors’ — despite sales being not that strong. The choice is yours, there’s the X-E2, X-A1, X-M1 and the series’ latest incarnation, the flagship X-T1, not to mention the XF1, XQ1, XS1, X100s, X20… That’s a great many cameras within a short time. I think you guess what I’m hinting at. Could less be more? I could easily go on and write that Fujifilm once again really really nails it with this weather-sealed X-T1 in a sturdy compact package, hoping that many of you will hit the order button and get great XF glass along with this promising little stunner. But there is more to a camera than just the specs and marketing behind it. Seems it just didn’t work out between the two of us…….

See on www.the.me

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Testing the Cosyspeed Camslinger | Thomas Leuthard

I guess you know the main problem in photography. You either don’t have a camera with you or you have to much equipment in your bag. I have seen too many over equipped photographers on the street. I even see myself highly overstuffed with gear. I carry two OM-Ds with one prime lens each, six spare batteries and two SD cards in my bag. I often wish to be much more minimalistic. I even define minimalistic projects for myself to force me focussing on the essential. So why not just taking one camera and one lens to the street? Here comes a possible solution. The ultimate bag for “The Mirrorless Hero”. Since I count myself to the mirrorless heroes, I wanted to test this camera bag. I was carrying the bag for a whole afternoon shooting on the streets of Zurich. The first impression was a bit weird. This revolver belt type of bag you hang loose around your waste. At the beginning it felt like I was loosing my pants, but you get used to that feeling very quickly. The best thing is that you have your upper body completely strap and bag free. This gives you the freedom to walk very relaxed and not to look like a photographer……

See on thomas.leuthard.photography

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Real-World Review of the Fujfilm X-T1 for Street Photography |
Eric Kim

X-T1 vs x100s?

Fuji has been quite prolific with their X-series cameras. There are so many models out there now, it might be difficult to choose an “ideal” camera for street photography. I’d say the only 2 “real” competitors for street photography are the X-T1 and the x100s. Why not the X-Pro 1? Well, it is pretty much like an older version of the X-T1 and has really slow autofocus. I’m going to try to list the pros/cons of the X-T1 and the x100s to help you make a better decision when deciding which one to get:

X-T1 Pros:

  •     Interchangeable lens options
  •     Dedicated ISO dial
  •     Faster / more accurate AF

X-T1 Cons:

  •     No optical viewfinder (if you prefer an optical finder)

x100s Pros:

  •     Smaller form factor
  •     Lighter
  •     Optical viewfinder

x100s Cons:

  •     Slower and less accurate AF
  •     Lack of interchangeable lens (if you like a 35mm focal length, then this isn’t a con)

So pretty much at the end of the day this is how I would make my decision: If you absolutely need an optical viewfinder, get the x100s. Otherwise, I’d get the X-T1. Why? The X-T1 is the newer, slicker, more capable, and powerful camera. Not only that, but the AF is far better in the X-T1 than the x100s. Also you can use different lenses (even manual M-mount lenses), and quickly change the ISO with the top dial…….

See on erickimphotography.com

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Fujifilm X-T1 review | Karl Bratby

I probably should start with the camera system I have been using for many years. That would be Canon, they have served me well, they have never broken down, never a fault, so you may ask why Fuji has come on to my radar, well the answer to that is image quality vs size, lens quality vs size. To be totally honest I’ve tried a few small system cameras over the past few months, Olympus Em-1, Sony A7r, both were ok and had their plus points, but didn’t float my boat. What I mean by that is I have to like what I use and I am incredibly picky, my camera has to be an extension of my mind, corny I know but its how I am. Before we start I’m no writer, not a review writer either, but thought others may like to read my views on the Fuji X system. Where do I start? My time as a fuji shooter is quite short although I did try the Xpro1 when it was 1st launched and we didn’t get along at all, but since the latest firmware I have learned to love it, quirks and all, its not perfect and can be quite slow to use, but image quality is not far off my Canon 1dx, so when i heard next generation, matured Fuji X system camera was to be launched I got quite excited, sad old fool I hear you say, its just a black box that takes pictures, no its not, its a black box full of hocus pocus magic tricks that takes amazing images……..

See on www.karlbratbyphotographer.co.uk

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