Reviews

Fuji X100S Review | StreetPXL

The X100 was Fuji’s first attempt at a large sensor, compact, mirrorless camera. Despite rave reviews, the X100 had a list of quirks that made it difficult to wield. Among them, slow autofocus and a poorly designed manual focus system. Fuji listened to feedback from its dedicated following and released the X100S. Better. Faster. Stronger. The Fuji X100S is the ultimate digital street photography camera. It has it all: outstanding build and image quality, usable features, and great controls…all wrapped up in a sexy compact body. There are some big name photographers singing the praises of the X100S as well. In a very candid review, Zack Arias wrote, “Fuji is the new Leica.” In a follow-up review, he addressed the flak he received: I stepped on some toes when I claimed that Fuji is the new Leica…I’ve had a Fuji in one hand and a Leica in another. Hand on my heart…I’d chose the Fuji………

Source: www.streetpxl.com

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Fuji X-T1 Review Follow-Up | Mason Marsh

When I penned my review of the Fujifilm X-T-1 camera several weeks back, I based my thoughts on a few months worth of shooting with the camera. I’ve kept at it and now I feel the need to follow up on my review with some additional thoughts and some honest adjustments to my previous opinions. First off, I want to address the issue I found with the foliage “smudging” in Adobe Lightroom. I found something interesting when I began looking at my raw files in both LR CC and Capture One Pro. Let me step back a couple of years first… When I began using Adobe Lightroom, I watched a video by Adobe evangelist Julianne Kost. In the video she made a strong case for converting raw files to DNG when importing into LR. I began doing just that and whenever I imported from my Canon camera I would convert the raw CR2 files into DNG……..

Source: www.masonmarsh.com

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Full Review of the Fuji XF 18-135mm Weather Sealed Lens |
Dan Bailey

A few weeks ago, I posted a first look review of the new XF18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 OIS WR lens, which is Fujifilm’s first weather resistant lens.  Although it can be used on any X-Series camera body, the 18-135 was designed in conjunction with the rugged, weather sealed X-T1, and it lets you shoot in out in the elements without having to worry about rain, heavy snow, water splashes or the spray from waterfalls getting inside your lens. In addition to the 20 points of weather sealing which have been incorporated into the barrel, the 18-135 also features a special ventilation system that helps prevent dust from being sucked into the lens when you zoom in and out. This is a really nice addition, because if you shoot in dusty conditions long enough, you’ll eventually see some of that dust work it’s way inside your lens. Believe me……..

Source: danbaileyphoto.com

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Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR Lens Review |
Michael R. Cruz

This is Fuji’s first weather sealed lens.  It is not the fast lens by any means, widest at f 3.5 up to f 5.6; but the focal length makes it a great travel lens.  This 7.5x super-zoom lens is equivalent to 27-206mm on a full-frame camera (35mm) it also comes with Optical Image Stabilization. If you are familiar with the 18-55mm lens or any Fujinon XF lenses you will have the same feel right at home with the XF 18-135mm.  The build quality of the lens is top notch and with a reasonable price tag it is a very attractive lens.  The mount like with any Fujinon XF lenses is metal and looks like it will last for a long time.  The Zoom ring has enough torque and smoothness combination to it.  I have no issues going back and forth for a different zoom range.  There’s also a knob to turn the OIS (Optical Image Stabilizer) on or off and a button for manual or Automatic Aperture control.  It also comes with a lens hood and a soft cloth pouch…….

Source: michaelrcruz.com

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X-vinTage1: My Fujifilm X-T1 review part two | Jonas Rask

Using vintage glass is something that I really enjoy. Given the contents of this blog, it might not come as a huge surprise to some of you. I started shooting vintage glass on the X-Pro1 a couple of years ago when I got a cheap Fujinon 50mm f/1.4. Since then I’ve ventured through a lot of vintage primes. Mostly in my favorite focal length of about 50’ish mm. Since these vintage lenses only uses manual focus, you need som help achieving critical focus when coupled to a digital camera. When Fujifilm added the Version 3.0 of their X-Pro1 firmware last summer, it finally came with Focus-peaking. Something that made the whole vintage-lens-thing much more enjoyable to use. The X-Pro1 still only does white highlight edges, which can be less that stellar in bright light conditions…..

Source: jonasraskphotography.com

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Fujifilm X30: First Look | Pixelogist.me

Yes, that’s the Fujifilm X30. Not a bad upgrade, and not something to make you jump around your room in excitement either. To me, it’s the X20 with an EVF. Nothing more. The few improvements, like the rotating (and clearer) LCD and the new control ring, will make a difference, and make it a nicer camera to use than the X20, but it’s still the same thing at heart. Not that this is a bad thing. The X20 is a very good camera to begin with. And having the same camera with a very high-quality EVF is a nice prospect indeed. But the market having cameras like the RX100 III, with the same kind of EVF, and a much larger sensor, and (in my opinion) a better AF system, in a significantly smaller body, Fujifilm needed to upgrade the core of the X20 to give us something new. A newer sensor – a larger one, at that – or a smaller body, or even a faster lens. Something of that sort. And not simply the same camera with an extra feature or two. For the first time since the X10 came out, I’m a bit disappointed with a new Fujifilm X-series model. Oh well……..

Source: pixelogist.me

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Rebecca Lily’s new Pro Set | Jakob

I am a preset guy. With two kids and two jobs, I am a big fan of anything that can speed up my workflow. I own the VSCO suite, Replichrome 1 & 2, AlienSkin’s Exposure and Red Leaf’s film emulsions. Being a heavy preset user, I welcomed the opportunity to test drive Rebecca Lily’s New Pro Set. I am a big fan of her work and absolutely love her “look”…in particular her colors. It’s easy to spot her signature colors in her new Pro Set. I randomly chose a wedding from my archives and had a lot of fun playing with different color schemes. I quickly realized this might take a while because so many of her presets worked so well. So instead of identifying one preset for the batch which I normally would do, I used quite a few of them to show their versatility …..

Source: www.jakobfoto.com

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Hands On Review: Fujifilm X-E2 + Fujifilm 18-55mm F2.8-4 R LM OIS |
Antonio Jorge Nunes

I just got my hands on a Fuji X-E2 kit with the Fuji XF 18-55 F2.8-4 OIS lens. As a longtime DSLR user, I’ve been skeptical about the mirrorless systems’ capabilities. I’ve tried a fair number of top compact cameras, but the results were always lacking. Last month, I got to play with a Fuji X-E1 for some time, and the results were really surprising in the best possible way. General use, image quality, and high ISO performance were on par with any APS-C DSLR I’ve tried. The X-E2 is even better. It has a better EVF, it’s faster, and it can focus better in low light conditions with its phase detection focusing system. It also boasts a second generation sensor and some nice improvements like dedicated AE-L / AF-L buttons…..

Source: blog.antonionunes.com

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From Nikon DSLRs to Fuji X cameras ~ Reflections on the X-T1 |
Alexander Leaman

My first proper camera was a Nikon FM. Just a silver Nikon with a 1.8 50mm lens. That’s what I could afford and all I could manage for my formative years as a student photographer. It’s a beautiful camera and really put me at the heart of photography with it’s simplicity and magical mechanical reliability. And the lens was a joy. I loved that camera and it became a crutch for me along with the ever honest and reliable Tri-X black and white film. In fact it was years before I would fall in love with another camera enough to make a move to a more automated world of the Canon EOS system – my weapon of choice was now an EOS 3. I felt like I was charting on my FM, but marching on with the times…….

Source: www.alexanderleaman.co.uk

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Review: Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR |
Jordan Steele

Fuji has done a great job in building a robust lineup for their X-Series mirrorless cameras, but despite releasing the weathersealed X-T1 earlier this year, they hadn’t created a weathersealed lens until now.  The XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R OIS WR is a wide range super-zoom lens that features Fuji’s new Weather Resistant tag, with rubber gaskets around all points of entry and even a novel ventilation system to allow air to enter and leave the lens without sucking in moisture and dust.  The lens covers a great range of focal lengths, equivalent to the field of view that a 27-205mm lens would have on a full frame camera.  The one big up front question with this lens is whether it’s worth the rather high $899 price of entry.  Let’s take a look…..

Source: admiringlight.com

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