Reviews

Fujinon XF 50-140 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR [Autofocus Speed] |
Jonas Jacobsson

This is the first part (out of two) of the Fujinon XF 50-140 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR lens and it will focus on speed and autofocus capabilities. I would like to state that this a non-scientific review and more of a real life experience. With that out of the way, lets get down to business. I picked up this lens from Fujifilm Nordic about a week and a half ago. After first trying it out very quickly at small fair in early december and really liking the few shots I took my expectations were high. Since there are lots of other sites that have tested the OIS thoroughly and with great results I have instead chosen to “analyze” how good the lens performs in two areas very important for this type of lens – autofocus on moving subjects (Part One) and image quality/portraits (Part Two, coming soon). That being said, the OIS is certainly fantastic, I’m getting shots at 1/8 second fully extended at 150 mm with great and sharp results. Very solid……

Source: www.jonasjacobsson.co
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Fujinon 18-135mm OIS Review | Peecee Studio

The Fujinon 18-135mm OIS is Fujifilm’s ‘superzoom’ for their X mount system. Love them or hate them, superzooms have a place in many photographers’ bags because of their convenience and affordability. Weighing in at a little under 490g, this is one of the heavier Fujinon lenses, around 190g heavier than the 18-55mm f/2.8-4 OIS kit lens included with their X-E2 and X-T1 and certainly heavier than all of their primes, the heaviest of which is the 56mm f/1.2, weighing in at just under 400g. However, it does weigh less than the 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 OIS telephoto zoom, which comes in at 570g. This lens is optically and mechanically excellent, as all Fujinon lenses are. Its image quality is great for a ‘superzoom’ and is more than sharp enough for day to day use. It’s well built and contains lots of metal, the zoom ring is rubber covered plastic. It’s also one of the few Fujinon lenses that are rated as WR – weather resistant. The only other lenses are the 16-55mm f/2.8 and 50-140mm f/2.8. So if you want to shoot in the rain and you don’t want to pony up for one of those beasts, then this is your only option……..

Source: peeceestudio.weebly.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6

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Why I Chose Small Compact Camera Like Fujifilm X100T | Wazari Wazir

Actually this is not so much about Fujifilm X100T camera but more about on why in certain situation it is better to have a small compact camera than using a big bulky DSLR camera. Most professional photographers doesn’t use a small compact camera as their main arsenal, most of them are using it as their backup or simply a second camera in case their big brother are in trouble but nowadays the image quality that you can get from a small compact camera like Fufilm X series and other brand with similar specification is good enough for serious task. Take a street photography for an example, if we were given a task to photographed or document a life on the street, I think nothing can beat small compact camera, simply because people don’t really bother, people don’t really care about you, you are not means serious business, you are just another “tourist” in the city. I’ve use DLSR all my life and whenever I take it out on the street, people will always pays attention to it and sometimes I miss a lot of great moment and most of the times I feel uncomfortable……

Source: www.wazariwazir.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fujinon 10-24mm f/4 OIS Review | Peecee Studio

The Fujifilm Fujinon 10-24mm f/4 OIS is their widest angle lens in their current lens lineup for the X mount. It covers an equivalent focal length of 15-35mm on full-frame, making it Fujifilm’s equivalent of the Nikon and Canon 16-35mm f/4 VR/IS lenses. This makes the Fuji 10-24mm f/4 OIS an extremely useful lens for landscape and architecture photographers. The f/4 aperture is large enough for most shooting and the inbuilt stabilisation (OIS) allows you to hand-hold this lens down to less than 1/4s at the wide end, making it extremely useful for low light photography. In this review, apart from discussing this lens itself, I’ll also be discussing it in comparison to other lenses as well as touching on a really important issue – whether you need an ultra-wide angle lens and how ultra-wide angle lenses are difficult to use compared to normal and telephoto lenses. Weighing in at only 404g, it’s significantly lighter than the Nikon 16-35mm f/4 VR (which is around 650g) as well as the Canon equivalent. It is the only Fuji X mount lens which goes this wide. The next widest is the Zeiss 12mm, followed by the Fuji 14mm f/2.8, which is only barely ‘ultra-wide’. This lens is optically and mechanically excellent, matching the tack sharp Nikon 16-35mm f/4 VR, but the Fuji is much better built, being made out of all metal apart from the zoom ring, which is rubber-covered plastic. Mechanically, this lens is excellent, the best built ultra-wide I’ve ever used.……

Source: peeceestudio.weebly.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF10-24mm F4.0

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Fuji 18mm f2 review – A little piece of magic | Lyle Genyk

I am currently in the midst of a year long project that has me tied to a single camera/focal length, the x100T. As a result I have decided to do a small cull, and get rid of some gear I haven’t used in a while. During the sorting phase of this cleanse I took my 18/2 and put it decidedly in the “keep forever” pile. Here is sat beside my x100LE, and my 35/1.4. The 18 however stood out for me. I love the 18mm focal length. It fits my eye, it adds drama to images, its good and wide but not too wide. Did I mention I love 18mm? When I started my 23, the T and me project my biggest fear was not being able to use my Fuji 18/2. I simply love this little lens, there is something about its rendering that just seems magical to me. Its sharp, yet the falloff from sharp to unsharp is so gentle. Its bokeh, its flare, all perfect to my eyes. I like this lens so much I decided to review it. Its been reviewed a lot but imo gets a bad rap. I’m here to set the record straight. Consider yourself warned, this review will not be very technical, I am just not a technical guy. My photography is about feel, and my reviews are about my real experience in real world usage. If its test charts and brick walls you’re after, you have come to the wrong place……

Source: photogenykstudios.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18mm F2.0

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The Leica M3 | 35mmc

I’m not always rational when it comes to buying cameras, quite often I buy them just for the experience of owning and trying them. But when it comes to the Leicas, I’ve tried to be a little more rational, and when it came to the Leica M3, I’ve tried even harder! I try to buy a Leica as tools with a function, even though I often end up seeing them as more than that once I own them. Taking the two M-mount Leicas I otherwise own as examples: The Leica M7 – with its basic level of automation and superb light meter – was bought as, and remains, the ideal Leica for me. The step sideways to the Leica M4-P gave me something a little less “bling”, something fully mechanical, something I felt I could trust implicitly. So why a Leica M3? Why buy a third Leica M-mount camera? ……..

Source: www.35mmc.com

Leica M review | TechRadar

We liked

The Leica M 240 is an inspiring camera to use, from the design of the body to the feel of its controls. With its new sensor and processor it also performs extremely well, and produces images that match the body for quality.

We disliked

Although handling is much improved in the M 240 over previous models, Leica could still make its menu system slicker to use, and improve the action of the exposure compensation button. There’s also a slightly limited ISO range that doesn’t fully include ISO 100 for fast lenses in daylight, or sensitivity settings beyond 6400 for very low light.

Verdict

The Leica M 240 offers beautiful image quality, with files that are full of detail and flexibility, from a camera that is a pleasure to use. The introduction of modern technology makes all the difference. M9 users might find upgrading to the M 240 a little painful as they won’t have had their current camera for long, but the difference in the new body really does make it a worthwhile move. The higher resolution sensor alone justifies the switch, but all the little extras add up to making the M 240 a completely different experience. Those using the M8 and M8.2 will see the benefits immediately……..

Source: www.techradar.com
 


Leica M-P 240

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Leica 90mm lenses – The Summarit, Thambar, Summicron,
Tele-Elmarit and other Leitz 90mm lenses | Thorsten Overgaard

The Leica Summarit lenses have an aura of “not good enough” about them. The “Summarit Quartet” of the 35mm, 50mm, 75mm and 90mm f/2.5-lenses was born during a period with changing CEOs and changing ownership of Leica Camera AG. What now were these new, economical lenses? This was almost blasphemy for the Leica users who are accustomed to hand-made lenses designed with no considerations to cost. The opinions were divided in 2007 when the “the evil Summarit quadruplets” were introduced. But now, with waiting lists from China to Cambridge for $7,000 Leica cameras and $11,000 Leica lenses, the Summarit series of four economical lenses are still alive and doing well. The secret behind the lower prices was rethinking the design and materials used, and that they made much larger batches. Hence more economical production overall. Leica lenses and cameras have traditionally been made in smaller batches. They would switch from making one type of lens in the morning, another after lunch and a third type after the afternoon tea. Very small batches. With the Summarit thousands were produced so as to be economical, always in stock, always available, and at a good price a new Leica user could easily handle. ……
 
Source: www.overgaard.dk
 


Leica M-P 240

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Fuji XT-1 Review | Marcus Kazmierczak

Last year I wrote about my new Fuji X100s camera; it was (and still is) a great camera, one of my all-time favorites. However, as the tech and camera world goes, something new comes along and Fuji announced the interchangeable lens XT-1 just a few months after I purchased the X100s. The XT-1 is everything I was looking for in a camera. So I ended up selling all of my Nikon gear and the X100s and purchased the Fuji XT-1, a 56mm f/1.2 and my every-day lens the 23mm f/1.4. The camera is amazing and realized I missed the flexibility of interchangeable lenses. Also, Wirecutter even agrees and rated the Fuji XT-1 as the best mirror-less camera…..

Source: mkaz.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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Fujifilm XF 50-140 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR | Douglas Fung

One thing that doesn’t seem to translate well between full frame and crop-frame shooting is the use of the classic 70-200mm f/2.8 workhorse zoom. This is a versatile focal length that does well for portraiture and event photography, but the equivalent crop-frame focal length of 50-140mm has never quite caught on. Crop users tend to be more casual in how they use their gear; as a collective group they tend to prefer longer focal lengths over mid-range quality. You often see DSLR users mounting those 70-200 f/2.8 onto crop-frame cameras, but that gives the effective field of view of 100-300mm on full-frame, which is somewhat awkward to use if you are moving in and out of a crowd during a social function. This comes back to the idea of the field of view for a classic working-zoom; it isn’t so much about dealing with distance as it is with creating compression and isolation. To that end, the Fujifilm Fujinon XF 50-140 mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR fits the bill……

Source: 1000wordpics.blogspot.de
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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