Reviews

Leica M review | TechRadar

We liked

The Leica M 240 is an inspiring camera to use, from the design of the body to the feel of its controls. With its new sensor and processor it also performs extremely well, and produces images that match the body for quality.

We disliked

Although handling is much improved in the M 240 over previous models, Leica could still make its menu system slicker to use, and improve the action of the exposure compensation button. There’s also a slightly limited ISO range that doesn’t fully include ISO 100 for fast lenses in daylight, or sensitivity settings beyond 6400 for very low light.

Verdict

The Leica M 240 offers beautiful image quality, with files that are full of detail and flexibility, from a camera that is a pleasure to use. The introduction of modern technology makes all the difference. M9 users might find upgrading to the M 240 a little painful as they won’t have had their current camera for long, but the difference in the new body really does make it a worthwhile move. The higher resolution sensor alone justifies the switch, but all the little extras add up to making the M 240 a completely different experience. Those using the M8 and M8.2 will see the benefits immediately……..

Source: www.techradar.com
 


Leica M-P 240

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Leica 90mm lenses – The Summarit, Thambar, Summicron,
Tele-Elmarit and other Leitz 90mm lenses | Thorsten Overgaard

The Leica Summarit lenses have an aura of „not good enough“ about them. The „Summarit Quartet“ of the 35mm, 50mm, 75mm and 90mm f/2.5-lenses was born during a period with changing CEOs and changing ownership of Leica Camera AG. What now were these new, economical lenses? This was almost blasphemy for the Leica users who are accustomed to hand-made lenses designed with no considerations to cost. The opinions were divided in 2007 when the „the evil Summarit quadruplets“ were introduced. But now, with waiting lists from China to Cambridge for $7,000 Leica cameras and $11,000 Leica lenses, the Summarit series of four economical lenses are still alive and doing well. The secret behind the lower prices was rethinking the design and materials used, and that they made much larger batches. Hence more economical production overall. Leica lenses and cameras have traditionally been made in smaller batches. They would switch from making one type of lens in the morning, another after lunch and a third type after the afternoon tea. Very small batches. With the Summarit thousands were produced so as to be economical, always in stock, always available, and at a good price a new Leica user could easily handle. ……
 
Source: www.overgaard.dk
 


Leica M-P 240

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fuji XT-1 Review | Marcus Kazmierczak

Last year I wrote about my new Fuji X100s camera; it was (and still is) a great camera, one of my all-time favorites. However, as the tech and camera world goes, something new comes along and Fuji announced the interchangeable lens XT-1 just a few months after I purchased the X100s. The XT-1 is everything I was looking for in a camera. So I ended up selling all of my Nikon gear and the X100s and purchased the Fuji XT-1, a 56mm f/1.2 and my every-day lens the 23mm f/1.4. The camera is amazing and realized I missed the flexibility of interchangeable lenses. Also, Wirecutter even agrees and rated the Fuji XT-1 as the best mirror-less camera…..

Source: mkaz.com
 


Fuji X-T1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 Review | PeeCee Studio

The Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 is one of two options for a normal (50mm eq.) lens on the Fujifilm X-mount system, with the other being the Fujifilm Fujinon 35mm f/1.4. Weighing in at a hair over 200g, the Zeiss Touit 32mm f/1.8 weighs in at just around 20g heavier than the Fujinon 35mm f/1.4. This Zeiss lens is extremely well built and is optically great, producing amazing images wide-open with both good acuity and contrast. It retails for around $700 in Australia. As with most lenses these days, especially the lenses available for the Fujifilm X system, it’s simply great. It works well for most things and completely negates the need for a normal zoom. With a fast f/1.8 aperture, it is perfect for low light shooting, allowing in over four times as much light as f/2.8 zooms such as the Fujinon 16-55mm f/2.8……..

Source: peeceestudio.weebly.com
 


Zeiss Touit 32mm F1.8

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujifilm X100T Review: Now Shooting! – Shooter’s Report Part | Eamon Hickey

I found the Fujifilm X100T to be a fairly good performer overall, with a couple of modest exceptions. Once I had it on and activated, it responded essentially instantly to any control inputs, but it was sometimes just a bit slow to wake from sleep. It’s a small issue, and in my outings with the X100T I didn’t miss any shots because of it, but I think if I owned one, this might rear up and bite me every now and then. As I mentioned in part 1 of this report, my first time out with the Fujifilm X100T was to shoot the Thanksgiving Day parade, and my next two shoots after that were also outdoors during daylight. I shot most of my images on these walks using the camera’s Single AF (AF-S) autofocus setting, and it worked very well for me, focusing quickly and decisively. On one walk, I suddenly noticed a construction crew just as they were fastening cables to a crane hook, and I was able to focus and shoot in a second or less; the camera’s AF system was easily quick enough for this kind of street shooting. On later outings, I tried the X100T’s AF system on nighttime subjects in the East Village neighborhood, and here again the camera focused well on the high-contrast subjects I was shooting using the AF-S mode. With some later indoor shots in restaurants, the X100T’s AF-S system was somewhat slower but still worked reasonably well, focusing accurately in about a second or a little less………

Source: www.imaging-resource.com
 


Fuji X100T

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujifilm X100T, a new friend | The Studio at 46 West

I’m a big fan of the Fujifilm X-Series range of digital cameras. In September 2010 Fuji decided to introduce a smaller, rangefinder looking camera based on an 12 MP APS-C sensor size. The X100 was born. This little gem looked like the Leica’s of old, or even an older Yashica. It was smallish, mirrorless and it had retro appeal, up close not so much but still it was retro cool. It came packaged with a very good fixed 23mm f/2 lens with a leaf shutter and a hybrid viewfinder offering a switchable EVF and OVF function. Crazy. It’s CMOS sensor was Fuji spec’ed but still used a traditional Bayer filter. It was a hit. People lined up to buy them and a cult like following was formed. I bought one right off, as soon as I could find one, Availability was scarce. Fuji never figured it would be as popular as it was. It was a quirky piece of gear to be sure. Its focus time could be measured with a sundial. The auto ISO function was weird in function and use. It took about 20 minutes it seemed to start and be ready to operate. It had issues. It shot at higher ISO values well though, had a ND filter built in, rendered beautiful Fuji colors like their films and also rendered killer B&W images. It didn’t much matter how quirky it was……..

Source: www.studio46west.com
 


Fuji X100T

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Field test | In the zone with the Fujifilm X100T | Basilimobile

I became a fan the first time I looked through the viewfinder of an X100 in a camera store in Singapore in 2011. I never did buy one, but handling that camera was the reason I became a Fujifilm shooter, starting with the wonderful compact X10 and moving onto the steadfast X-E1. I resisted the pull of the improved X100S when it was introduced and bought an X-E2 instead. The newly released X100T with its various internal and external refinements was, however, too much of a temptation and I’m now the very happy owner of an outstanding example of Japanese engineering. I’ve read a lot of reviews of this camera, and there’s a lot of love out there for it. Rather than review the X100T, I decided to test it out on the streets, and in the tradition of classic street photography, using zone focusing. It wasn’t a particularly scientific test, but it was an interesting experiment and a lot of fun. veryone gushes about it, but it really is a beautiful little camera, a piece of industrial art. The latest refinements, particularly the enhanced viewfinder and new rear button design and layout, have pushed this camera closer to perfection. For me, as far as user experience goes, this camera is about as good as it gets, although I have added a Fujifilm thumb grip and a small soft release button – both of which I use on my X-E cameras as they dramatically improve the ergonomics of these types of camera bodies. I’ve also fitted a simple black leather wrist strap that will become more supple as it ages. It secures the camera but is less cumbersome than a neck strap…….

Source: basilimobilephotographs.com
 


Fuji X100T

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujifilm X-T1 Graphite Silver Edition: So good they coloured it twice |
Adam Oxford

Pity the poor copywriter who works for a paint manufacturing company. It’s got to make the brain sore when you have to think up unique names for 50 different shades of beige. You’d think it would be easier if you’re making cameras for a living: they tend to be black or grey or, in extreme cases, shouty neon pink. And yet no: Fujifilm is so proud of the soft matte finish on the refresh model of its X-T1 flagship mirrorless camera that it’s neither graphite nor silver. It’s Graphite Silver, and it’s ace. Graphite Silver. A matte finish to the hard metal edges of the original black X-T1 which has a slightly soft, plastic feel and frankly oozes class. It looks great and feels good in the hand too. But is it worth the premium you pay over the vanilla X-T1 which is, let’s face it, only a year old anyway? Other than the respray, the X-T1 Graphite Silver Edition is, for almost all functional and physical purposes, identical to the existing X-T1. The body is the same size and weight, with the lines of a classic SLR before they started getting outsized. The button layout is the same and every last piece of hardware inside is identical. The only slight differences are that the rubberised grip is slightly stickier than the original and the back buttons feel marginally more responsive……..

Source: www.htxt.co.za
 


Fuji X-T1 Graphite Silver

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Leica M Monochrom review | Techradar

The Leica M-Monochrom is like no other camera on the market and it’s extremely difficult to pass judgement on it by way of comparison. This test provided one of those rare occasions where I enjoyed looking at the pictures produced more than I did actually using the camera. The Monochrom is an awkward beast to handle and demands that you alter the way you see as well as the way you work. Essentially it offers little in the way of flexibility. The images it produces are extremely good, and even the noise is attractive, but the tonal characteristics are dark and moody, and find light and jolly subjects a challenge. It shoots like a TV news programme – full of dramatic grit, dirt and death, with only the occasional positive story. The question of whether it’s worth its price tag is redundant – of course it isn’t, but that won’t stop Leica selling out, because there are more than enough people with money to spend who will want one.

We liked
Exceptional detail and versatility from the raw files allows dramatic post-capture editing, so you can remodel images the way you want. And the Monochrom is built to last forever.

We disliked
The viewfinder information and menu system are prehistoric, while the rear screen really has no place on a camera that offers such image quality and demands such expense……

Source: www.techradar.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Review: Fujifilm 11mm Extension Tube MCEX-11 | Jordan Steele

Fuji surprised the market by releasing something that is both the first of its kind and something that people have been waiting for since the beginning of mirrorless: Native OEM extension tubes. It’s surprising to me that it took 6 years for the first original equipment manufacturer to create extension tubes for their system.  In November 2014, Fuji announced the MCEX-11 and MCEX-16: 11mm and 16mm extension tubes for their X-Series cameras.  Third party manufacturers have made a handful of extension tubes for various mounts for some time, but these two are the first from the camera manufacturers themselves.  In this short review, I’m going to take a look at the Fuji 11mm extension tube, the MCEX-11, which retails for $99 ……

Source: admiringlight.com
 


Fuji MCEX-11 macro extension

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Page 5 to 69« First...34567...102030...Last »