Street Photography

Fuji X Pro 1 | Steve Coleman

So what camera should I use for street photography? Well… thats like asking what car should I use to go shopping in! The easy answer of course is any camera, though there is no doubt in mind that different cameras give different experiences, which in turn can be the difference between enjoying the experience or feeling like your trying to take pictures wearing boxing gloves. At this point I should say I’m attaching some pictures with this post, not to demonstrate anything I’m about to say, you can see the technical quality of my pictures as they’re all taken with the Pro 1, this post is about the camera as more than positive EV or how fast it can auto focus. This post has nothing to do with the cameras technicalities. It has taken me 3 attempts to find what I consider to be the perfect camera for my needs, though I am still searching and looking for different ways to indulge in street photography. So where an I at the moment? Well I’m currently shacked up with the Fuji X Pro1. In my humble opinion the closest thing you’ll get to the classic rangefinder style that seems so engrained and used by photographers worldwide when shooting street style……..

Source: www.streetframe.co.uk

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Paris in Schwarz-Weiss mit der Fuji X-T1 und 3 Primes |
Detlef Hollenbeck

Ende Mai ging es für 4 Tage nach Paris. In unserer kleinen Fotogruppe sparen wir monatlich 20,- € an, um gelegentlich davon Fototouren zu planen. So kam es dazu, das wir dieses Jahr mit unseren Lebenspartnern über das lange Christi Himmelfahrt Wochenende in die Stadt der Liebe fuhren. Morgens erst mit dem Auto bis nach Leverkusen, dort sicher geparkt ging es dann per Regionalexpress bis zum Kölner Hauptbahnhof, von dem wir mit dem Thalys direkt zum Pariser Bahnhof “Gar du Nord”starteten. Ich hatte lange überlegt, welche Objektive ich zu meiner X-T1 mitnehmen soll. Die Zooms 18-55 und 55-200 zusammen mit dem 14er, oder nur Festbrennweiten? Letztendlich habe ich mich dann für die 3 Festbrennweiten 14-2.8, 35-1.4 und dem 56-1.2 entschieden. Allerdings hatte ich Angst, das mir die 85mm des 56 Objektivs am langen Ende nicht reichen würden, und so nahm ich vorsichtshalber noch das 55-200 mit. Nach kurzer Zeit (vielleicht 2 Stunden), wurden mir alle Objektive dann doch zu schwer, so das ich mich dazu entschloss, das Zoom mit den knapp 640 Gramm im Hotel zu lassen. So sind nur 2 Bilder in den 4 Tagen mit dem 55-200 gemacht worden. Ob ihr sie wohl findet !?

Source: www.hollys-bilderwelt.blogspot.de

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On a street photography mission armed with my Fuji X-Pro 1 |
Keith Moss

Budapest is hot and humid this morning, the temperature is eventually going to rise to 32c.. pretty hot for this Englishman on a street photography mission armed with my Fuji X-Pro 1. I head for the popular Vaci Utca which starts at the Great Central Market and stretches along to Voromarty Ter square and leads you to the famous spectacular Chain Bridge. The street is filled with restaurants and posh shops, high prices and high pressure selling. The prices in the restaurants and cafes are more than double sometimes triple of what I am paying near my apartment. For me its a place that offers the street photographer not a lot, so this area won’t be included in my course, but well worth a visit just to have a stroll around and enjoy the atmosphere.. Across the Chain Bridge into Buda the oldest and more historical part of the city, the best of which is situated well above the river Danube so you have to climb.. There are only two ways up, one is the hard way shanks pony the other can only be described as a near vertical funicular which will carry you from the foot of the bridge up to the Royal Palace and the Castle with grace and ease, you can guess which one I took. Once at the top it offers spectacular panoramic views of Pest across the river. You can also see the Hungarian Parliament building which was based on Westminster in London…….

Source: streetphotographycourses.co.uk

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Street Photography is as simple as it is complex.
Tips for Street Photography | Art Photo Feature

Street photography is one of the purest forms of photography. It is also one of the most difficult forms of photography. It’s difficult because we usually don’t have much control over the environment, well at least as much as we might like. Street photography is about the uncertainty… the challenge… the joy of capturing that perfect moment… perfect in terms of light, texture, and elements all perfectly in place. As the Admins of the APF Street photography Group, we will be sharing tips on street photography every week, these are based on our experiences. Over the years, we have been in various situations, shooting in different parts of the world and based on our experiences we want to help you realise that there are opportunities to take good street photographs almost everywhere. These tips will help you keep it simple and hopefully make your job easier the next time you go on the street …We hope you will find these useful…….

See on www.artphotofeature.com

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Review of the Fujifilm x100s for Street Photography | Eric Kim

I remember when the Fujifilm x100 first came out. It was quite the commotion– it seemed like the best camera for street photography. It was designed like a rangefinder, but didn’t have the sticker price of a digital Leica. It sported a compact body, fixed 35mm f/2 lens, and an optical viewfinder. It seemed like the perfect camera for street photography. Early adopters of the camera either really loved the camera or were very frustrated with it. Common complaints I heard was the slow autofocusing speed, complicated menus, and difficulty to use manual focusing with the camera. But for those who stuck with the x100– they learned to work around the quirks of the camera and really made some superb images from it (like Rinzi Ruiz, Jack Simon, Brian Day, and many more). When the x100s came out, it solved a lot of the issues from the original x100. The menus were simpler, the autofocusing speeds were drastically improved, and the sensor was also given an upgrade………

See on erickimphotography.com

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Fuji XF35 f/1.4 and XF60 f/2.4 – A Street Photography Review . . . |
Kevin Shelley

. . . In my previous post I wrote that I’d purchased the XF35 & XF60 Fuji lenses as replacements for the XF18-55mm Zoom. I couldn’t wait to put them through their paces and discover if this was indeed the right choice . . . . . . Living as I do in the UK’s equivalent of the Australian Outback (the Western Lake District), Street Photography would appear to be an odd choice of hobby. My predicament was recently made all the more unbearable with these two new lenses that desperately needed trying out. Fortunately, a 30 mile trip to Barrow-In-Furness appeared unexpectedly, so I jumped at the chance to spend a couple of hours taking photo’s with the new ‘tools of the trade’…….

See on www.streetphotographyblog.co.uk

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Don’t Overlook the Nuances in Street Photography | Joe Newmann

One of the most important things about street photography is to have a keen eye for your surroundings. Sometimes, it’s the subtle relationships that make for a great image. Take a quick look at this photo by Flickr user Sabrina M., and you’ll notice it has nice framing, strong lines and a pleasing composition. But it’s the subtext of the photo — the emotional distance of the two women — that makes it great. The women are standing just a few feet apart, each smoking a cigarette and each seemingly oblivious to the other. It’s almost as if they’re taking great pains to avoid making eye contact. Are the women using their cell phones because they need to send important texts or is it because it gives them a reason for not making small talk? These are things that Sabrina says went through her mind when she came upon this scene in her hometown of Antwerp, Belgium. This photo was taken near Antwerp’s city hall in an area where many of the homes have survived from the 16th Century……..

See on www.huffingtonpost.com

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Mystical Marrakech | Street Photography with Zack Arias
and the X-T1 | Fujifilm Middle East

Zack Arias spent three days in Marrakech, Morocco with the FujiFilm X-T1 and shared a few tips and tricks on getting the best out of your camera for street photography. All still images are from the FujiFilm X-T1 using the following lenses: The new 10-24mm, 27mm F2.8 Pancake lens, the 23mm F1.4 lens.

Filmed, Edited & Produced by Harun Yasin Tuna
Music by the excellent Maalam Driss Gnaoui and L’hiba (Qanoun Player)

See on youtube

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Back to the streets with the X-Pro1 | Gabor Nagy

The last couple of months my go to camera for street photography and actually for everything else was the Fuji X100s. As I was getting ready for my next photo walk in the city I checked my equipment and realized that some of the batteries needed to be charged, but the charger just gave up, it didn’t work anymore. What to do now, I had a few photo shoot coming up where I was going to use the X100s, but I had only 3 fully charged batteries left, so there goes my little friend back to the bag and I grabbed my old friend, the Fuji X-Pro1 with the 35mm lens. Uh, I missed this beast. And shame on me because of thinking of selling it and get a new X-T1 instead. I’m sure the X-T1 is great and I was really looking forward to try it out but after holding it in my hand for a minute in a camera shop, I still don’t know. So we will see if the final nail in the coffin of my Canon kit will be the X-T1 or some other future Fuji camera. (If somebody from Fuji reads this and want to make my decision easier by lending me an X-T1, I wouldn’t say no.)…….

See on gaborimages.blogspot.de

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Working on Layers: Manila Street Photography GoPro POV with the
Fujifilm x100s | Eric Kim

 
In this video I shot with the Fujifilm x100s and pre-focused my lens to around 5-10 meters (manual focus), shot at f/8, ISO 800, aperture-priority mode, optical viewfinder, and worked on trying to get more layers in the shot. The technique I used here was trying to get someone in the extreme foreground in the photo, and the subject in the background sharp. You can read more about this approach in my “Multiple Subjects” composition lesson. In addition, I also made a conscious effort to stick around and “work the scene” — by taking multiple shots of the same scene, rather than just taking one shot and moving on…….

See on erickimphotography.com

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