Wedding Photography

Getting Married with the Fuji X-T1 & XF 56mm F1.2 | Olaf Sztaba

While we view ourselves as landscape and fine art photographers, we don’t shy from other areas of photography. Quite the contrary! While photographing landscapes we usually travel to less popular locations, enjoy the serenity of the mornings and take our time to focus on the scene. As a result the majority of our work is being done in isolation. While we cherish those moments, sometimes we want to challenge ourselves with different genres of photography. One of them is wedding photography. While wedding photographers sometimes receive a bad rap from their peers, we hold many wedding photographers in high regard. It is a very demanding business, which requires the highest skills, especially in composition and lighting. The part that attracts us the most is the interaction with people and seeing their reactions and emotions. So to take a break from our usual work, Kasia and I occasionally photograph a wedding. Recently, we had the chance to photograph a stunning ceremony with the X-T1, X-Pro1, X100S and XF 35mm F1.4 and the latest 56mm F1.2 lens. In fact we took nearly 70% of all images during the day with the XF 56mm F1.2. After reviewing our material, we both agreed that this is the best, sharpest X-series lens from Fuji ever, and one of the best we have ever shot with. But see for yourself. All the images are JPEGs straight from the camera. Notice the beautiful skin tones, bohen and colour rendition. For the father’s portrait we used Westcott IceLight. All images below, except the groom getting dressed (X-Pro1 & XF 35mm F1.4), were taken with the Fujifilm X-T1 and XF 56mm F1.2………

See on olafphotoblog.com

flattr this!

Desfile com a X100S | Eh Namour


Fui convidado para um evento da marca de vestidos Nova Noivas e levei despretensiosamente minha Fuji X100S comigo. Na hora do desfile não resisti, liguei minha câmera e aproveitei a luz incrível que prepararam na passarela. Com ISO 2000, velocidade em 250 e abertura a f/5.6 fiz a maioria das fotografias. O foco rápido pois tinha uma situação de contraste perfeita. Editei as imagens cortando em proporção 4/3, e mesmo em tamanho menor ainda mantive qualidade. Processei muito pouco as imagens em JPEG originais, dando aspecto do filme preto e branco da Fuji Neopan Across 100…..


See on www.ehnamour.com

flattr this!

Montego Bay Wedding Photography | Ashley & Garrett (Preview) |
V. Opoku

Man, I love an adventure! I have had some incredible experiences in my lifetime, and this is right up there with the best of them. Ashley & Garrett, you guys are the coolest – way beyond anything I could have imagined; still not as cool as Rachel & Jeje though. It was an honour to spend the past week in Jamaica together with you, your kids, and your family & friends – we had fun! It is going to be very difficult to express such an awesome experience and my hope is that these photographs repay your trust and faith in me. This. Is. Just. A. Preview. And YES Ash, I will be your BFF, so long as Garrett is ok with it. Boom!

See more great pictures on vopoku.com

flattr this!

Wedding Photojournalism with the Fuji X100S | Paul Rogers

There was a good response after last weeks post giving some examples of how I’ve used the Fuji X100S mirrorless camera whilst photographing a wedding, so I thought I’d post a few more pictures. Again, these are mainly from the preparation and drinks reception, points in the day when I can take my time to concentrate on the composition and not worry too much about being ‘reactionary’. One of the things I love about using this tiny camera is the fast f/2.0 fixed 23mm lens. Because the sensor is smaller than a traditional 35mm DSLR, the equivalent focal length is 35mm, and the images have slightly more depth of field than a f/2.0 lens would have on it’s larger cousin. But for a camera this small, the shallow depth of field is still almost unique. I use that feature a lot in my compositions, framing the subject with natural elements, the depth of field drawing the viewers attention to the subject with less distraction…..

See more pictures on www.rogerspictures.com

flattr this!

Documentary Wedding Photography with the Fuji X100S |
Paul Rogers

There are lots of benefits of using the tiny and silent Fuji X100S to photograph a wedding. Although I mainly use Canon cameras through the wedding day, there are many great opportunities when this little camera is a better option for me. That’s usually when I want to get in close to my subjects without affecting their behaviour. Its small size, and silence is what’s most important here. But there have been small and quiet compact cameras around for a while now – what makes the Fuji different is the amazing clarity and image quality. These images fit in perfectly with those shot on the larger Canon SLR’s, and it’s pretty hard to distinguish between them in the finished set. To prove this point, all of these images were shot on the Fuji X100S. I’ve used the camera during the preparations as well as when doing the portrait session with the bride and groom. Also over the last year, I’ve been trying to put my heavy DSLR’s in the bag for an hour or so, and just mingle with the guests. The camera and sensor are versatile enough to be able to use it in more or less any lighting conditions, so I can concentrate on recognising great moments and the composition……

See more pictures on www.rogerspictures.com

flattr this!

Street Photography – Sydney | Rene Gaviola


 
Dawes Point Park, The Rocks in Sydney
 

The hot spot for wedding photography. Fuji X-Pro1

See more pictures on renegaviola.com

flattr this!

X100 Wedding | Luc Pher

I rarely do wedding shoots as paid jobs.  Most of my wedding assignments are for close friends who has seen my work and are willing to give free rein to my “artistic” interpretations. My typical gear for the wedding assignments used to be 2 Canon DSLR, one mounted with a prime (85mm 1.8) and a Tamron 17-50 zoom. With the launch of Fuji X-system “rangefinder” like cameras, I started using these lightweight, versatile and discreet camera to complement my normal wedding rigs. My very first forage in the use of Fuji “X” system for wedding shoots started with the X100 coupled with a Canon 5DMk2 mounted with a 16-25 2.8. It was a church wedding for an ex-colleague of mine in a packed hall filled with guests and lots of kids. I enjoyed moments when I just pack my 5DMk2 into the bag and walk around with just the X100. The X100, looking like a small discreet toy camera makes me look like one of the many guests when shooting. During the wedding ceremony, the X100 with barely audible shutter sound, is my choice for capturing many wonderful moments. Were there parts when the X100 struggled? Yes, there are. At the end of the 6 hours shoot, I down to the last bar of my second battery. I have to remind myself not to chimp so as to conserve the battery life. The auto-focus, compared to my 5DMK2, is not as fast, but this can be overcome with anticipation and careful positioning……

See more pictures on lucpher.wordpress.com

flattr this!

Fujifilm – Xpro-1 Wedding Photography Michigan USA |
Craig David Butler

The Xpro-1 was has been my go to camera for personal use for some time now. While I have used it at several weddings over this past year I have not made it my main camera until this past weekend on Friday (10/18/2013). In my previous post at a wedding earlier this year I captured some incredible images and processed lightly in photoshop to Black and White. This time was a little different – I knew the capabilities of the camera. It has this amazing ability to capture a wider dynamic range and this being a very sunny day I wanted to see how it would do capturing a  white gown in such a contrasty situation. I also wanted to compare the white balance to my Canon 5DIII captures. My findings and now general assumptions are that the Xpro-1 is able to capture a more natural white balance, low chromatic aberration at low F-stops and the ability to capture a wider dynamic range. I have also found that my thought process during most photos with this camera are a little more planned rather than the spur of the moment capture I am usually doing with the Canon’s. Composition is also a little more accurate as I love the ability to level the camera in the viewfinder…….

See more pictures on cdbsi.net

flattr this!

Wedding Photography at Botleys Mansion | Kevin Mullins

The second of my three weddings in three days was the wedding photography at Botleys Mansion of Liz and Iain. The day started for me at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Teddington where a piper welcomed the guests into this lovely big church. Ceremony and congratulations completed, we took the 30 minute drive up to Botleys Mansion where, it has to be said, the weather was truly splendid – all day. Botleys Mansion is one of my favourite wedding venues and a popular on in Surrey too.  On this day, Iain and Liz’s guests could explore the grounds and gardens before heading inside for some dinner and dancing……

See great pictures on www.kevinmullinsphotography.co.uk

flattr this!

How I Shoot a Wedding – 1 – My Gear | Bert Stephani

I’m probably not your typical wedding photographer and I only shoot a maximum of ten weddings a year. Wedding photography jobs used to be a substantial part of my paid work when I started out. I found out that I absolutely loved this challenging type of photography (and I still do) but only if I don’t shoot a ton of weddings. Wedding photography doesn’t mix very well with the family agenda if the rest of the family is into a 5 days of school/work + 2 days of weekend rhythm. It’s not just the often 14+ hours days, it’s also that I’m usually in recovery mode, the day after, thus being unavailable for the family for the whole weekend. A wedding is too important to shoot on experience alone in my opinion. If I shoot a wedding I want to give it my all and tell the story of this day to my very best ability. That means that it requires a lot of energy, an amount of energy that I can’t bring up weekend after weekend. I have some friends that are able to do this for 30 weddings a year and I really admire them for it but I just can’t do it. So that’s another reason why I don’t shoot more than 10 weddings a year.  The final reason for the limited amount of weddings is that I need to do it my way. I probably turn down more potential wedding clients than I accept. I know that this may sound pretentious and arrogant but it isn’t. I want to do the best job that I possibly can, but that’s something I can only do with the right clients. I don’t care how they look or how expensive their wedding is but there needs to be a connection and a high degree of trust. So again, I’m probably not a typical wedding photographer and I don’t consider nor aspire to be an expert in this genre. But as I shot a wedding last weekend I thought I’d share with you how I approach a wedding in a series of blogposts. Let’s start of with the gear…..

See more pictures on confessionsxl.com

flattr this!

Page 2 to 612345...Last »