Travel Photography

Swiss travels | The Big Picture Gallery

A couple of years ago we went on a hastily arranged break and ended up in the Swiss Alps. I guess this became the start of my journey into serious landscape photography. When asked by my partner where to go, I mentioned that I fancied the Alps, half an hour later with the help of an online article from the Guardian, entitled Europes 10 best camp sites, we had settled on La Fouly in the Val Ferret. Close to the French and Italian borders and part of the Mont Blanc massif. So epic peaks and vistas beckoned. Camera kit comprised 2 D3 bodies and associated lenses, and I also took along the dinky little Fuji x100. Along with various filters and tripod. My girlfriend remarked about the amount of gear I was taking.  Never mind the hair drier, electric fan heater, and other assorted goodies she had managed to hide away.

Source: www.thebigpicturegallery.com
 


Fuji X-E1

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Faces of India | Jeremy Lagay

In June 2014 my boss called me : “I’ve registered you to a training, in India, it’s OK for you ?”… Hum, I’d never been to India ! I had heard many things about this country. This kind of general information that makes already in your mind a sort of global picture, “the legend one”. So I would easily say that I had a kind of clear idea about how it would be. I would not surprised anyone of you if I even say a preconceived idea. “Don’t worry, no problem boss, I would love to go to India for this training. Where is it”. “It’s in Bangalore, in September”…Let’s be honest, I had this mix of excitement & stress. A lot to do before to leave, but at least one thing was always in my mind : prepare yourself to take photos of people. I’ve found couple of information on the net to organize my trip & I made everything to get a bit of free time there. Everybody was saying that Indians are very kind to photographs, like a small paradise in this regards. The rest, I would discover it there, surprise… So I left in September, as planned……

Source: jlag.exposure.co
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Business Trip to Dubai | X100s | Simon Burgess

I was lucky enough to have been asked to go to Dubai on a 2 week Business Trip in January (tough call)…Whilst I knew there’d be very little, if any time. to take any pictures, I took my Fuji X100s  just in case I had a bit of free time. As I was there over 2 weekends I hoped I could get a few hours shooting time in. I managed a few hours on Saturday to take a quick Taxi to Deira (the old part) and have a wander around the Spice and Gold Souks and along the Creek. The Souks were great and a wonderful place for Street Photography and being Dubai, very safe. However I still showed a mixture of respect and caution out on the Street. For all the Photo geeks, the Fuji was great, quick silent and discrete, the perfect Street camera. The Taxi driver was originally from Peshawar…He didn’t seem to get my hilarious ”Peshwari Naan ” joke when he mentioned his Grandmother…oh well….

Source: simonburgessphotography.com
 


Fuji X100S

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Rome – Shooting jpeg! | Finn-B Hansen

In my previous post I mentioned that I was going to do an experiment during my trip to Rome, shooting only jpegs. I brought two of my Fuji cameras, the X-T1 and the X100s. I was also planning to test out the new classic chrome simulation in my X-T1. I decided to shoot only in jpeg, but I admit that I was tempted several times during the trip to set the camera to RAW+F. However, I stood by my decision, and kept the cameras on jpeg. The reason for doing this was all the discussions in a many X groups about the quality of the Fuji jpeg’s, and also to measure the quality of the images shooting under sometimes very difficult conditions. My conclusion is that in most cases the jpeg settings works really well, but sometimes I had problems when the light conditions changed fast. Most of the problems was clipping highlights and loosing details in the shadows. Sometimes it was also tricky to get the correct white balance. Some of those issues can be fixed using small corrections in Lightroom, but the WB can be difficult to correct on a jpeg file. I did this just as a test, and I’m really happy with the result, but in the future I will still shoot RAW for having more control. However, It was fun testing it!….

Source: www.finn-b.com
 


Fuji X100S

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Death Valley – A Journey to a Visual Mecca | Olaf Sztaba

There is no shortage of stunning places in North America and Kasia and I have hunted out many fantastic landscapes. Despite our travels, no other landscape has made such a profound visual and emotional impact on us as Death Valley. It is a visual Mecca for those who find beauty in remote, strange and rare places. Death Valley is in California’s Mojave Desert. It is the lowest, driest and hottest place in North America. Death Valley holds the highest air temperature ever recorded on earth: 56.7 C. While planning our trip, Death Valley was last on our list (after the Grand Canyon, Monument Valley, Route 66 and San Francisco). The only reason for that was efficiency and logistics. Since we had never visited Death Valley before, our intention was to soak up the atmosphere and gaze at the landscape. Given that we entered the Death Valley National Park from the east, we stopped by Rhyolite Ghost Town……..

Source: olafphotoblog.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fuji X Adventures in North America – Rust Belt Pilgrim |
Peter Dareth Evans

This is McKean County, Pennsylvania. Once the Allegheny hills were a forest of oil derricks, stretching as far as the eye could see along the ridges and valleys between Bradford, Olean, Kane and Smethport.  But then after the second world war the Mid-West oil industry collapsed when richer and easier pickings were found elsewhere. Now the trees have returned to the hills of McKean County, where they tactfully mask the industrial scars of old leaking pipes and rusting machinery. Here in the deep forest you hike and hunt alone at your peril. Folk have fallen through the rotting boards covering the shafts of old oil wells. A sudden snap and then a long agonising tumble, a broken leg and no phone reception – miles from civilisation. So I made sure I stuck to the roadside for my photography. But still, here and there nestled in isolated pockets on the winding country roads, industry survives. Smoke rises from the stacks. Steam boils from the pipes. You can hear the hum of machinery and the clanking of gears and wheels. This is rust belt America, but here and there you can see signs of recovery. The county capital of Bradford may have lost half her population in the crash that followed the 1940’s, but unlike the deprived ex-mining communities in the valleys of South Wales there’s still hope…….

Source: petetakespictures.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Fuji X100T and VSCO Cam | Philippines | Jakub Puchalski

Believe it or not, but when leaving for the four-month family trip around Asia, I decided I need something smaller and more compact than my old Fuji X-E1. Since Christmas was only 4 weeks ahead, I gave myself a gift: new shiny black Fuji X100T. Compactness was one major reason. Another one was the Wi-Fi feature, which allowed me to travel without a laptop, but with a tablet and smartphone only. Thanks to this setup I was uploading pictures directly to my little dual sim Motorola Moto E (another great compact yet powerful travel companion), processing with VSCO Cam and posting straight to the social media (here’s my instagram profile). No need to carry heavy computer, no need to wait with post-processing (at least the initial one) until I’m back at home in April – I can share some of the pictures already now! Below you will find a sample of pictures taken with Fuji X100T (all SOOC JPEG’s) and slightly processed in VSCO Cam. In most cases I didn’t use the presets, just the basic exposure dials, because Fuji colors are so perfect most of the time. Regarding the camera itself, I’m still getting used to the new focal length (I was shooting almost exclusively with the 35mm 1.4 for the last three years), but apart from that I feel like I have finally found the one. I won’t go into details, because there’s already dozens of X100T reviews on the net. Let me just say that apart from the obvious advantages like improved speed and ergonomics, this camera simply has a soul. And I mean it when I say that: taking pictures with it is magical………..

Source: www.jakubpuchalski.com


Fuji X100T

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Why I Choose To Travel With Fujifilm X100T Mirrorless Camera On
Trans-Siberian Railway Adventure | Wazari Wazir

Okay, Before I go further , before I you waste your precious, times, let me be honest with you guys and gals, I’m not doing a review for this new Fujifilm X100T Mirrorless camera, I just bought it two days before flying to London to start my Trans-Siberian journey. I didn’t have any experience with Fujifilm Mirrorless camera before and this is my first experience using it. So if you wanted to get an in depth review about the camera, this is not the right place for you. Anyway one of the reason I choose this camera is that, I wanted to travel light, yes this compact camera is in the range of premium compact camera, it is not very cheap and not very expensive either, it sit on the middle range, with the same amount of  money, you can get a quite decent DSLR camera with interchangeable lens, this camera has a fixed 23 mm lens or equivalent to 35mm field of view of full-frame camera. Even though they have a fix lens, they also offer you a Wide Conversion and Tele Conversion lens. Actually the quality of picture from X100T and the previous X100s is more or less is the same because both of them use the same sensor, the only different is just a minor, just a little bit of extra function and with the addition of Wifi (Remote Shooting & Image Transfer to Smartphone)……

Source: www.wazariwazir.com
 


Fuji X100T

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

A Walk in Istanbul from the Grand Bazaar to Fatih Mosque |
Chris Pattison

If you are visiting a new place on a short break, and have an aversion to organised tours (as most street photographers surely have) it is a very good idea to do some research before you go. Skim through a decent travel guide to get an idea of where you want to go. If you are visiting a huge metropolis like Istanbul, and only have 3 days like I did, you could zone in on three areas you find of interest and dedicate one day to each of them. And so it came to pass on the first full day in Istanbul, my mate Colin and I began to cover the ground we had roughly mapped out a couple of weeks before back home. Starting from our hotel, our intent was to visit the Grand Bazaar (Kapalı Çarşı) first of all and then make our way north-west towards Fatih Mosque (Fatih Camii), taking in the sights and sounds along the way, of which there are many. The Grand Bazaar is rightly a major tourist attraction; an ancient proto-shopping mall of some 66 streets and four thousand shops. It’s definitely pleasurable exploring the bazaar, but from a street photographer’s perspective, there are better hunting grounds. The place has been so well-trodden by travellers wielding cameras that many of the shops now display signs asking you not to take photographs of their wares. That’s a bit like a herd of wildebeest planting a placard in the ground for lions to read saying, “We know what you are up to, but please don’t bother. We are tired of it and we aren’t actually that tasty” …….

Source: streetlevelphotography.com

Day 1: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/11/15/of-mosques-and-cats-a-walk-in-istanbul-from-the-grand-bazaar-to-fatih-mosque/
 
Day 2: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/12/23/never-mind-the-rain-heres-the-istanbul-a-walk-around-sultanahmet/
 
Day 3: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/12/30/hunting-shopping-and-fishing-a-walk-in-istanbul-from-galata-bridge-to-taksim-square/
 
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Bhutan: Tranquility in the Land of the Thunder Dragon | Ross Kennedy

As globalisation takes hold and starts to squeeze all the diversity out of even the farthest-flung cultures, it is quite a surprise to find a tiny country holding the modern world at bay. Bhutan’s unique topography and location in a forgotten corner of the Himalaya have left it free to pick and choose which parts of 21st century life to let past the border gate. Any development is done under strict regulations which famously prioritise “Gross National Happiness” and protection of the environment over Gross National Profit.  Rather than rushing headlong into economic progress, the country has taken a long hard look at the mistakes of its neighbours and decided to do things a little differently. Until the 1960’s, the country remained closed-off from the outside world, operating without currency, health services or roads. Only the Chinese invasion of neighbouring Tibet pushed the government into opening up its border with India and the start of a cautious modernisation. TV and the internet were “allowed” in 1999. Each important town is dominated by an enormous white Dzong – imposing fortress-monasteries which were constructed in the 16th century to protect the country from Tibetan invasion. Each dzong is a strange fusion of church and state, containing both the local government administration and a monastery. Monks flit silently across the courtyards like scarlet wraiths while well-fed minor bureaucrats huff and puff up rickety staircases……..

Source: blog.rosskennedyimages.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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