Patrick Leong

Fuji MCEX-11 And MCEX-16 Extension Tubes Review | Patrick Leong

Extension tubes can be great tools for those who are looking for a cheaper alternative when doing close up or macro work.  They are also great for people who just want to experiment with macro photography but are not necessarily ready to invest a lot of money into a macro lens.  While there are some aftermarket extension tubes out there for the X Series system, Fuji themselves have also decided to make their own: the MCEX-11 and MCEX-16.  They’ve been out for a while but I haven’t had the chance to give them a try until now, so here is my short review of them. Overall, these extension tubes are more expensive than third party versions but they are also very well-built.  They are very solid, and all metal.  They definitely do not feel cheap, and they even have a nice heft to them.  The extension tubes also have electronic contacts built into them for the aperture information and autofocus functions……..

Source: Fuji MCEX-11 And MCEX-16 Extension Tubes Review

Fuji XF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens Review | Patrick Leong

It’s only been a few short years yet Fuji has definitely been very busy expanding their X Series system. They went from having just three fixed focal length lenses to a system that now encompasses a vast range of different fixed focal length and zoom lenses. Thanks to the newly released Fuji XF 100-400mm f4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens, they’ve now expanded to the extreme telephoto range. So far, Fuji have done a really good job making some first class lenses, so expectations are very high for this new zoom, especially since the asking price of $1899 makes this the most expensive lens in the X Series system so far. So, does the XF 100-400mm fulfill these expectations? Does it measure up? Read on and find out…..

Source: Fuji XF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR lens Review

Fuji X-Pro2 Review: The X-Pro1’s Successor Finally Arrives | Patrick Leong

The Fuji X-Pro1 was a special camera because of several reasons.  First, it played a huge role in starting a brand new interchangeable lens system that in a relatively short amount of time, has grown into one that is prominent, and one that has helped Fuji firmly establish a place in the mirrorless world.  It was also the answer for many people who were looking for a rangefinder styled camera that performed superbly but also was decently priced.  However, a lot has changed in 4 or 5 years.  While the X-Pro1 is still a great camera, it has started lagging in some key areas.  Seeing this, Fuji finally released its successor, the Fuji X-Pro2. The specs look pretty good on paper, and it seems that Fuji has fulfilled a lot of the wishes and demands that users of the X-Pro1 have been asking for.  But its rivals are even more competitive nowadays, so are the modifications and improvements made to the X-Pro2 enough to keep it competitive in the market?  Read on and find out………

Source: findingrange.com

Fuji X70 Review: A New Compact X Series Camera | Patrick Leong

So much has changed since the days of the first X100 or even the X-Pro1.  The Fuji X Series has grown into a system that now encompasses an extensive range of products in an attempt to appeal to a broader range of photographers and enthusiasts.  A new camera that has just been recently added to this growing system is the Fuji X70.  This new camera uses essentially the same basic recipe that has made the X Series so popular amongst its followers, like the same sensor and analog controls of it’s other siblings, but puts it all in a very compact form.  By doing this, Fuji hopes to appeal to users looking for a high end compact camera with the performance and characteristics of the X Series. I review a lot of Fuji X gear, and one thing is for certain: build quality is getting better and better as new products are being introduced…..

Source: findingrange.com

Fuji XF 27mm F2.8 Review: Pancake Lens For The X Series | Patrick Leong

If you want something that will produce excellent results all while maintaining a compact form, a mirrorless camera is hard to beat. To match the small size of some of these mirrorless cameras, many manufacturers have built their own version of a “pancake” lens. Fuji has a couple of lenses that are very compact like the XF 18mm F2 but the XF 27mm F2.8 is their first official pancake lens. The truth is, I didn’t have much desire to try this lens when it was first released. It didn’t seem like it had that many qualities that would help it stand out from the rest of the XF lenses other than its compact size. But when I was planning for my trip to Walt Disney World, I wanted a very compact system, so I wouldn’t have to lug around so much gear in a place where there are long lines and a lot of walking. I brought with me a Fuji X-T10, and I decided to give the XF 27mm a try because the focal length was right between a traditional 35mm and 50mm, and therefore, my thought was that this one lens coul get me through my trip. Plus, I thought the ultra compact size would be a great match with the small dimensions of the X-T10. Here are my results from this lens and what I think of it…….

Source: findingrange.com

Fuji X-T10 Review From Walt Disney World | Patrick Leong

This is a great time to get into the The Fuji X Series System.  There are more lenses than ever before, the tech is getting better, and there have been some recent big announcements, such as, the release of the long-awaited Fuji X-Pro2.  But not everyone wants to shell out almost $1,700 for a camera body, especially if they just want to give the X Series a try.  Luckily, Fuji also produces cameras that are more budget friendly.  One of these cameras is the Fuji X-T10, which has always intrigued me because it’s essentially a stripped down version of the X-T1 (a camera that I own and love).  I just never got around to trying one out but my recent trip to Walt Disney World seemed like the perfect opportunity to do so.  Disney is a great place to visit but it can be very crowded……

Source: findingrange.com

Fuji XF 35mm F2 R WR vs. XF 35mm F1.4 R Lens Comparison |
Patrick Leong

To me, the XF 35mm F1.4 is an excellent lens.  It’s combination of impressive optics, speed, focal length, versatility, size, and price make it a great workhorse, and one of the most popular lenses in the Fuji X Series system.  But now, another lens of this focal length, the XF 35mm F2 R WR lens, has been introduced by Fuji, which is sure to make some who are interested in a 53mm equivalent lens wonder which version of this focal length is best for them. I figured since I had both lenses in my hands, I would write up a comparison between these two optics.  Just keep in mind a few things as you read it: These tests are meant to be fun, and while they can tell you about certain traits a lens may have, these tests never tell the whole story……..

Source: findingrange.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 35mm F2.0 R WR

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fuji XF 35mm F2 R WR Lens Review | Patrick Leong

One of the first X Series lenses introduced was the XF 35mm F1.4, which soon became one of the most popular lenses in the X Series system.  With its excellent image quality, compact size, focal length, and price, it was an absolute workhorse of a lens, and to this day, it’s still one of my favorites.  Instead of stopping there, Fuji has recently introduced another 53mm equivalent, the XF 35mm F2 R WR lens.  This lens may be a stop slower than the F1.4 version but it also brings along with it the latest tech from Fujifilm, such as, weather sealing, and better autofocus all while being more compact and costing $399, which is essentially $200 less than the XF 35mm F1.4.  Does this lens deliver the goods?  Read on further to find out……

Source: findingrange.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 35mm F2.0 R WR

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

A Visit to Park Slope With The Fuji XF 35mm F2 Lens | Patrick Leong

I went over to Park Slope yesterday to visit a friend because he’s hugely into photography like me, and he wanted to see the new Fuji XF 35mm F2 R WR lens.  For those who don’t know, Park Slope is part of Brooklyn. I don’t visit it much but I should.  It actually has some great places to eat, and a beautiful park (Prospect Park) whose designers, I believe, also designed Central Park. In addition to bringing the XF 35mm F2 lens and my X-T1, I also brought along my XF 35mm F1.4 and my tripod.  As I mentioned earlier, my friend is also into photography, so he had no problem or should I say, he didn’t get bored assisting me in taking some comparison shots between the two lenses.  I wanted these photos because in addition to my upcoming review of the 35mm F2, I thought it would be cool to write up a comparison between the two Fuji 35mm lenses……..

Source: findingrange.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 35mm F2.0 R WR

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fuji XF 90mm F2 LM WR Lens Review | Patrick Leong

When I first invested in the Fuji X Series system, there was only one camera: the X100.  After a while, the X-Pro1 was introduced, which had many of the same features as the X100 but also had the ability to interchange lenses.  At the time, there were only three lenses, which I also bought.  Now, in just a short amount of time, Fuji has grown from that small system into something that includes a large selection of lenses that not only are excellent optically but encompass a huge variety of focal lengths aimed at satisfying a broader audience.  What was once a compact system that some could argue was aimed at purists or even rangefinder users has now grown into a system that also gives some users the option to leave their larger DSLR cameras for a compact mirrorless design.  One lens that was missing from this continuously increasing list of lenses was a decent 135mm focal length lens, which is often considered as a classic portraiture lens……

Source: findingrange.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 90mm F2.0

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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