Patrick Leong

The Leica 75 Summilux Review | Patrick Leong

The 560 g Leica 75 Summilux was created in 1980, and features 7 elements in 5 groups. It was manufactured in Canada and later in Germany. Thanks to Dr. Walter Mandler (whose specialty was designing Double Gauss lenses), this lens has been pushed to the limits in non-aspherical Double Gauss design. This quality has allowed the 75 Summilux to stay in the Leica catalog all the way up till 2008. That’s a full 28 years before this lens was finally retired. And for those who don’t know, Dr. Mandler designed over 45 lenses for Leica. In fact, he helped Leica create the first ever 35 ƒ1.4 lens for any 35mm format. Dr. Mandler also designed the 50 Summilux, which was unsurpassed and remained in the Leica catalog for 40 years until new aspheric fabrication techniques allowed for improvement. Lastly, the design of the 75 Summilux derives from the classic Noctilux, which only adds to this lens’ legendary status……..

Source: findingrange.com

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Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2 R Lens Review | Patrick Leong

A fast short-tele portrait lens is a “must-have” for many photographers, especially for those in the wedding and portrait industry yet for a long time, it was missing in the Fuji X Series lineup.  There are third party versions, and there’s also the sharp, compact XF 60mm F2.4 but nothing made by Fuji, below the F2.0 range.  As of spring 2014, that changed with the release of the XF 56mm F1.2 R lens, an optic that many have been patiently waiting for.  With the crop factor taken into account, the 56mm F1.2 is approximately an 84mm equivalent, which is a preferred focal length for many portrait and wedding photographers.  Its fast aperture is also prized in this type of lens both for available light photography and for creating beautiful shallow depth of field or as some refer to as “bokeh”.  So far, the details sound promising but does the XF 56mm F1.2 really cut it?  Is it worth its asking price of $999.00?  Was it worth the wait?  Let’s find out……

Source: findingrange.com

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Leica M9 Revisited | Patrick Leong

I finally had some free time this weekend, so I did some much needed spring cleaning of my hard drive.  I accumulate photos fast, and I have a bad habit of telling myself that I will store my photos properly another day but then I don’t.  Going through my hard drive is not something I was excited about but it was nice to look back at some of my old photos. Sometimes (especially in the digital world), I feel like all I’m doing is shooting, then processing, shooting, then processing.  There are times when I don’t really get the chance to just sit back and look at what I shot, and going through my old photos was really nice because each one brought back a specific memory.  And for me, part of why I love photography is that it helps me preserve memories, and experiences that I went through.  Thoughts like the weather, what I was thinking at the moment, and what I was doing at the time have been flooding back into my head.  I shot a lot with my Leica M9, and low and behold, I actually found a folder with some of my M9 shots, so I thought I’d post a few…..

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Fujifilm X-T1 Review: The X Series Taken to The Next Level |
Patrick Leong

Fuji X-T1 Verdict:

I’ve been using the X Series line since the X100 days, and thinking back, it’s quite amazing how far Fuji has taken the system in such a short time.  Not only are there myriad bodies to choose from, there are some seriously high quality optics to accompany the system along with various other third party lenses thanks to the abundance of adapters. The Fuji X-T1 is definitely a departure from the design of previous X Mount cameras in that it has taken the form of a mini retro DSLR over the rangefinder-styled form of past Fuji cameras, and I have to admit, the rangefinder guy in me kind of misses that design aspect. Nevertheless, I think it’s this uniqueness in the X Series lineup that helps maintain the magic that makes the X Series special.  Let’s be honest, Fuji has been coming out with a lot of different models, and if you ask me, I don’t know if they necessarily need to update so fast all of the time.  But the X-T1 is different than some of the other models that were simply designed to refresh an existing model.  It not only looks different, it feels different, which to me, feels like it is something special.  It’s the excitement and feeling I got when I first bought my X100, X-Pro1, and X-E1………

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A Vintage Alternative With Fuji X-E1 | Meng Yeap

… I tested the Helios 44m in a lot of situations, and it still produces awesome or pleasant photos. I tried using the Fuji X-E1 with 44m combo for street shoots, still life, landscape and of course, portrait shoots, and the lens produces awesome results (Do check out my blog for more of the photos produced). Some might say it will not be as good as the new Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 and I believe so too. The Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 sounds and looks like a very sexy lens (very tempting) but that will not make the Helios 44m a bad lens. In fact if you compare the price of both lenses, the Helios 44m might be a beautiful lens you would be happily using yet having the funds to purchase other available lenses or support other stuff in your life. So, sometimes it is good to look backward and make a vintage alternative. Good day ahead……

Visit Meng’s website:

http://www.mengyeap.blogspot.com/

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A Few Black and White Pics From My Fuji X-E2 And
Zeiss Touit 12mm | Patrick Leong

Over the weekend, my friend Haru came over from Westchester to help me out. As some of you know, Bob at Bergen County Camera was nice enough to lend me a Leica 75 Summarit, and I wanted to test it out on a person.  Luckily I have a very patient and understanding friend. So far, the lens is fantastic.  Best of all, it’s not much bigger than a 50mm lens. I’m writing up a review on it using my M 240 but I will also be writing up my experience with it on my X-E2. The lens actually works superbly on Fuji, and since the lens isn’t that heavy, it still feels very balance on the X-E2. I had some time left over, and I thought I would take out my Zeiss Touit 12mm F2.8.  I thought the 18mm equivalent of the Zeiss would offer a unique perspective, and more importantly, we had a blast with it.  Plus, we were in very tight quarters, so a wide angle definitely came in handy. If you’re a frequent visitor to my blog, you probably already know that this is one of my favorite lenses for the Fuji X Series system.  Other than it being big (especially with the hood), it’s a pretty handy lens, and excellent optically. When I bought it, I didn’t know I was going to use it so much but it turns out that this is one of my most used lenses.  In fact, a lot of times, this is the only lens that I carry with me………

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Fujifilm X-E2 Review: Further Refining The X-E Design |
Patrick Leong

Ever since the X-E1′s released, it has been one of the most popular X Series cameras, and there are several significant reasons for this.  It’s compact, it reminds us of simpler times in photography with its exceptional analog controls, it’s well built, and it produces stellar imagery.  While it’s not a rangefinder, it does have many qualities of one, which many including myself, find extremely appealing.  Best of all, the price is very reasonable.  But like all cameras, the X-E1 is not perfect, and in order to fix some of these imperfections, the Fuji X-E2 was released……

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Fujifilm Fujinon XF 23mm F1.4 R Lens Review | Patrick Leong

The 35mm lens is one of the most popular focal lengths for photographers because of its versatility in street, reportage, and landscape photography.  For a long time, it was the one lens that was sorely missing in the Fuji XF lineup.  If you wanted a 35mm equivalent lens, you would have to either adapt another manufacturer’s lens, purchase the XF 18-55mm zoom or the XF 18mm, which is approximately a 27mm equivalent.  Fuji made a promise a long time ago that they would produce a 35mm equivalent lens, one with an F1.4 aperture no less, and people have been waiting very patiently for Fuji to deliver on this promise.  The wait is finally over: Fuji has finally released the XF 23mm F1.4 R lens, which is one of the most highly anticipated lenses in the XF lineup…..

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Zeiss Touit 32mm F1.8 vs. Fuji XF 35mm F1.4 R Lens Comparison |
Patrick Leong

The Fuji XF 35mm F1.4 R lens is one of the most popular lenses for the Fuji X Series.  It was the lens that I was looking forward to most when I first purchased my X-Pro1, and I’m sure it’s a first lens for many people.  It’s fast, it’s well built, it’s compact, and it produces fantastic image quality.  Recently though, Zeiss has entered the game with their Zeiss Touit series of lenses. So far, Zeiss has produced two lenses for the X Series: a 12mm F2.8 and a 32mm F1.8.  I really enjoyed my time with the 12mm F2.8.  However, that’s not to say that Fuji’s XF 14mm is bad in any way. In fact, I’ve only heard great things about the Fuji.  But the Zeiss is a great option as well if you want something wider than a 21mm equivalent. With the Zeiss 32mm, things are a little different because I believe the focal length is a lot closer to Fuji’s XF 35mm lens yet it costs $300 more.  If you think about it, that’s 50% more then the XF 35mm, which many think is one of the best lenses for the Fuji X Series.  Is the Zeiss worth the extra money?…..

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Match Technical Thumbs Up EP-7S Review For The Fuji X-Pro1 |
Patrick Leong

Like almost everything else in the world these days, camera equipment can be customized to suit one’s needs.  This customization goes further than just picking what kind of lenses or film you prefer (if you shoot with film).  Nowadays, there’s a huge market for little trinkets, such as, neck straps, hand grips and even soft release buttons.  One popular accessory for rangefinder and mirrorless cameras are the Thumbs Up devices made by Match Technical.  I’ve heard of only great things about Match Technical’s Thumbs Up devices but never used them because I was content with how my cameras felt in my hands.  As they say, “If it ain’t broke, why fix it?”  So, why am I writing a post about the Thumbs Up EP-7S for the X-Pro1?  Well, one of my friends, who’s visiting from California, recently bought an EP-7S for his X-Pro1, and told me I need to try it out.  I figured, why not?  Who am I to say no to trying out new gear, right?

Match Technical Thumbs Up EP-7S Build Quality:

The great thing about the EP-7S is that it looks like an OEM product on my X-Pro1.  It doesn’t look like a cheap aftermarket part nor does it feel like one at all.  The EP-7S feels exactly how it looks in the photos.  It’s an extremely well-made, solid piece of brass that matches perfectly with the Fuji X-Pro1.  It slides into the hot shoe surprisingly very smoothly, and it’s an absolutely perfect fit.  It’s tight but in no way does it feel like it doesn’t belong in there.  The EP-7S also has two silicone rubber inserts on the inner part of it that provide stable contact with the camera, and protects the camera from marks and scratches……

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