Travel Photography

South Pacific Sojourn – To Zoom or Not To Zoom | Patrick Leong

This is the first part of a two-part article about photography on a thirty day cruise, & related photo gear considerations as well as image capture experiences. Not quite two months ago, while checking email on my computer, I received an incredible offer from our travel agent to take a last minute cruise from San Diego to Hawaii & then to seven islands in French Polynesia.  Places with far away names like Bora Bora, Raiatea, Tahiti, Moorea, Rangiroa & Nuku Hiva conjured up images for me that are a photographer’s dream come true.  So my wife & I jumped at this opportunity.  This led to my next question of whether to take the most basic photo gear or a more capable but also more complex setup.  In my case, the former would be my Fuji X-E2 with its outstanding XF18-55mm zoom lens; the latter would be a selection of some or all of my prime lenses for this camera, with or without the zoom.  For me this is the XF-14mm, the XF-35mm, a Zeiss Planar 50mm, & finally a Leica Tele-Elmarit 90mm.  I provided a prior write up on this blog of my experiences in adapting these last two Leica M mount lenses to my Fuji X-E2 using the M adapter made by Fuji (see my two-part article on this blog titled “A Tale Of Two Lenses”)……..

Source: findingrange.com
 


Fuji X-E2

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Fuji X! The Light Weight Really Matters! | Mohamed Hakem

I’ve written before on how Fuji helped me unhinge new passion in the street photography but now I’m back with a new experience. After the switched from DSLR (Nikon D800) to Mirrorless (Fuji X-T1). I wrote before on how this switch helped me discover new genres in photography as street and people. But what I couldn’t imagine is that the mirrorless could outperform the DSLRs in landscape also! I am a landscape photographer and I’ve been a loyal Nikon user all my life. Coming from a monster in the shape of a camera (D800) made me see all other cameras as toys. Huge dynamic range and massive pixels. When I first got into the Fuji’s I was never expecting that it will one day be my main camera and replace the D800, and it did!….

Source: www.stevehuffphoto.com
 


Fuji X-T1

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Swiss travels | The Big Picture Gallery

A couple of years ago we went on a hastily arranged break and ended up in the Swiss Alps. I guess this became the start of my journey into serious landscape photography. When asked by my partner where to go, I mentioned that I fancied the Alps, half an hour later with the help of an online article from the Guardian, entitled Europes 10 best camp sites, we had settled on La Fouly in the Val Ferret. Close to the French and Italian borders and part of the Mont Blanc massif. So epic peaks and vistas beckoned. Camera kit comprised 2 D3 bodies and associated lenses, and I also took along the dinky little Fuji x100. Along with various filters and tripod. My girlfriend remarked about the amount of gear I was taking.  Never mind the hair drier, electric fan heater, and other assorted goodies she had managed to hide away.

Source: www.thebigpicturegallery.com
 


Fuji X-E1

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Faces of India | Jeremy Lagay

In June 2014 my boss called me : “I’ve registered you to a training, in India, it’s OK for you ?”… Hum, I’d never been to India ! I had heard many things about this country. This kind of general information that makes already in your mind a sort of global picture, “the legend one”. So I would easily say that I had a kind of clear idea about how it would be. I would not surprised anyone of you if I even say a preconceived idea. “Don’t worry, no problem boss, I would love to go to India for this training. Where is it”. “It’s in Bangalore, in September”…Let’s be honest, I had this mix of excitement & stress. A lot to do before to leave, but at least one thing was always in my mind : prepare yourself to take photos of people. I’ve found couple of information on the net to organize my trip & I made everything to get a bit of free time there. Everybody was saying that Indians are very kind to photographs, like a small paradise in this regards. The rest, I would discover it there, surprise… So I left in September, as planned……

Source: jlag.exposure.co
 


Fuji X-Pro1

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Rome – Shooting jpeg! | Finn-B Hansen

In my previous post I mentioned that I was going to do an experiment during my trip to Rome, shooting only jpegs. I brought two of my Fuji cameras, the X-T1 and the X100s. I was also planning to test out the new classic chrome simulation in my X-T1. I decided to shoot only in jpeg, but I admit that I was tempted several times during the trip to set the camera to RAW+F. However, I stood by my decision, and kept the cameras on jpeg. The reason for doing this was all the discussions in a many X groups about the quality of the Fuji jpeg’s, and also to measure the quality of the images shooting under sometimes very difficult conditions. My conclusion is that in most cases the jpeg settings works really well, but sometimes I had problems when the light conditions changed fast. Most of the problems was clipping highlights and loosing details in the shadows. Sometimes it was also tricky to get the correct white balance. Some of those issues can be fixed using small corrections in Lightroom, but the WB can be difficult to correct on a jpeg file. I did this just as a test, and I’m really happy with the result, but in the future I will still shoot RAW for having more control. However, It was fun testing it!….

Source: www.finn-b.com
 


Fuji X100S

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Fuji X100T and VSCO Cam | Philippines | Jakub Puchalski

Believe it or not, but when leaving for the four-month family trip around Asia, I decided I need something smaller and more compact than my old Fuji X-E1. Since Christmas was only 4 weeks ahead, I gave myself a gift: new shiny black Fuji X100T. Compactness was one major reason. Another one was the Wi-Fi feature, which allowed me to travel without a laptop, but with a tablet and smartphone only. Thanks to this setup I was uploading pictures directly to my little dual sim Motorola Moto E (another great compact yet powerful travel companion), processing with VSCO Cam and posting straight to the social media (here’s my instagram profile). No need to carry heavy computer, no need to wait with post-processing (at least the initial one) until I’m back at home in April – I can share some of the pictures already now! Below you will find a sample of pictures taken with Fuji X100T (all SOOC JPEG’s) and slightly processed in VSCO Cam. In most cases I didn’t use the presets, just the basic exposure dials, because Fuji colors are so perfect most of the time. Regarding the camera itself, I’m still getting used to the new focal length (I was shooting almost exclusively with the 35mm 1.4 for the last three years), but apart from that I feel like I have finally found the one. I won’t go into details, because there’s already dozens of X100T reviews on the net. Let me just say that apart from the obvious advantages like improved speed and ergonomics, this camera simply has a soul. And I mean it when I say that: taking pictures with it is magical………..

Source: www.jakubpuchalski.com


Fuji X100T

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Why I Choose To Travel With Fujifilm X100T Mirrorless Camera On
Trans-Siberian Railway Adventure | Wazari Wazir

Okay, Before I go further , before I you waste your precious, times, let me be honest with you guys and gals, I’m not doing a review for this new Fujifilm X100T Mirrorless camera, I just bought it two days before flying to London to start my Trans-Siberian journey. I didn’t have any experience with Fujifilm Mirrorless camera before and this is my first experience using it. So if you wanted to get an in depth review about the camera, this is not the right place for you. Anyway one of the reason I choose this camera is that, I wanted to travel light, yes this compact camera is in the range of premium compact camera, it is not very cheap and not very expensive either, it sit on the middle range, with the same amount of  money, you can get a quite decent DSLR camera with interchangeable lens, this camera has a fixed 23 mm lens or equivalent to 35mm field of view of full-frame camera. Even though they have a fix lens, they also offer you a Wide Conversion and Tele Conversion lens. Actually the quality of picture from X100T and the previous X100s is more or less is the same because both of them use the same sensor, the only different is just a minor, just a little bit of extra function and with the addition of Wifi (Remote Shooting & Image Transfer to Smartphone)……

Source: www.wazariwazir.com
 


Fuji X100T

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Fujifilm X100S Travel Photography Review | Vincent Opoku

Travelling will always be part of who I am as a person and also part of my photography brand. The people I meet, the stories we exchange, the food and drinks. The cultural experience, seeing things in a different perspective, all this and more helps me grow and develop as a person and as a photographer. But I don’t travel for the sake of photography, I travel for the experience. The images I create along the way is a natural by-product of me being a photographer. Out of a 14-day trip, I probably spend 2 days where I will go out to actively shoot, the other days I will have a camera in a messenger bag along with other items (books etc), and only reach for the camera if I see something that I think is worth capturing. I spent 6 days in Barcelona last summer and I didn’t even bother to take my camera out the during my time there, I just wanted to enjoy where I was. When I travel I tend to just go with the flow, I even book one-way ticket sometimes. I end up moving around  a lot between various cities and countries on a single trip. So it is vital that my luggage is as light as possible. My Fujifilm X100S Travel Photography Review : I have visited 9 countries in the last 20 months or so and explored towns and cities like Chefchaouen (pronounced, Shafshawan – The Blue Pearl), Paris, NYC, Seville, San Luca De Barrameda, Tuscany and Lusaka, to name a few. My X100S has been with me to everyone single one of them, as a result I think I have gotten to know it well enough to share my thoughts and findings on this little gem………

Source: vopoku.com
 


Fuji X100S

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A Walk in Istanbul from the Grand Bazaar to Fatih Mosque |
Chris Pattison

If you are visiting a new place on a short break, and have an aversion to organised tours (as most street photographers surely have) it is a very good idea to do some research before you go. Skim through a decent travel guide to get an idea of where you want to go. If you are visiting a huge metropolis like Istanbul, and only have 3 days like I did, you could zone in on three areas you find of interest and dedicate one day to each of them. And so it came to pass on the first full day in Istanbul, my mate Colin and I began to cover the ground we had roughly mapped out a couple of weeks before back home. Starting from our hotel, our intent was to visit the Grand Bazaar (Kapalı Çarşı) first of all and then make our way north-west towards Fatih Mosque (Fatih Camii), taking in the sights and sounds along the way, of which there are many. The Grand Bazaar is rightly a major tourist attraction; an ancient proto-shopping mall of some 66 streets and four thousand shops. It’s definitely pleasurable exploring the bazaar, but from a street photographer’s perspective, there are better hunting grounds. The place has been so well-trodden by travellers wielding cameras that many of the shops now display signs asking you not to take photographs of their wares. That’s a bit like a herd of wildebeest planting a placard in the ground for lions to read saying, “We know what you are up to, but please don’t bother. We are tired of it and we aren’t actually that tasty” …….

Source: streetlevelphotography.com

Day 1: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/11/15/of-mosques-and-cats-a-walk-in-istanbul-from-the-grand-bazaar-to-fatih-mosque/
 
Day 2: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/12/23/never-mind-the-rain-heres-the-istanbul-a-walk-around-sultanahmet/
 
Day 3: http://streetlevelphotography.com/2014/12/30/hunting-shopping-and-fishing-a-walk-in-istanbul-from-galata-bridge-to-taksim-square/
 
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Bhutan: Tranquility in the Land of the Thunder Dragon | Ross Kennedy

As globalisation takes hold and starts to squeeze all the diversity out of even the farthest-flung cultures, it is quite a surprise to find a tiny country holding the modern world at bay. Bhutan’s unique topography and location in a forgotten corner of the Himalaya have left it free to pick and choose which parts of 21st century life to let past the border gate. Any development is done under strict regulations which famously prioritise “Gross National Happiness” and protection of the environment over Gross National Profit.  Rather than rushing headlong into economic progress, the country has taken a long hard look at the mistakes of its neighbours and decided to do things a little differently. Until the 1960’s, the country remained closed-off from the outside world, operating without currency, health services or roads. Only the Chinese invasion of neighbouring Tibet pushed the government into opening up its border with India and the start of a cautious modernisation. TV and the internet were “allowed” in 1999. Each important town is dominated by an enormous white Dzong – imposing fortress-monasteries which were constructed in the 16th century to protect the country from Tibetan invasion. Each dzong is a strange fusion of church and state, containing both the local government administration and a monastery. Monks flit silently across the courtyards like scarlet wraiths while well-fed minor bureaucrats huff and puff up rickety staircases……..

Source: blog.rosskennedyimages.com
 


Fuji X-Pro1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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