Fuji X100s

The Death of Kaizen? A Change in Fujifilm’s Update Strategy |
Henry Smiths

It’s hard to remember now, but was actually back in September of 2010, that Fujifilm, abandoned the hybrid Fujifilm imager/Nikon Body template that it had been following since the early 2000’s, and introduced a new and intriguing digital camera that hearkened back to rangefinder cameras of the past.  This camera, known as the X 100, was introduced as a premium product for the discerning photographer. It was a beautiful camera, and its design evoked an emotional response from older photographers, who could recall an earlier age when camera settings were set by turning dials, and aperture rings.   It featured, a fast , sharp fixed focus lens, and an excellent imager.   It had the effect of reducing photography,which had been increasingly complicated by burgeoning technology, back to its essence. But it was a deeply flawed product at its introduction……..

Source: henrysmithscottage.com
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Fujifilm Q&A @ CP+ 2015: What next for X-mount | Imaging Resouce

But [for example], while we have provided firmware upgrades for the X100S many times, now we have the X100T, we’re finished, no firmware upgrades [for the X100S] anymore. Makoto Oishi

Continuing my series of executive interviews from the recent CP+ 2015 show in Yokohama Japan, I met with Mr. Makoto Oishi from the Sales & Marketing Division, Optical Device & Electronic Imaging Products Division at Fujifilm Corp. Topics for discussion included the company’s X-mount mirrorless camera plans, first and third-party glass for X-mount cameras, and Fuji’s unusually generous firmware update philosophy. Perhaps most interesting to me, though, was an insight into how Fuji sees 4K video capture and its place in the market — doubly so when Oishi-san turned the tables and I briefly became the interviewee, sharing my own thoughts on the adoption of ultra high-def video.

(As always, we’ve done some editing to the dialog to remove conversational glitches and make the text scan better. Places where we’ve inserted a word or changed the phrasing for better readability are enclosed in square braces and italicized. So, too, are comments of my own, reading between the lines of the discussion.) ……

Source: www.imaging-resource.com
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Chefchaouen – The Blue Pearl | V. Opoku

Somethings are forever, they stay with us. The few days I spent in Chefchaouen (pronounced Shafshawan) during the summer of 2014 is one of those. Located in Northwest Morocco. This beautiful town sits beneath the raw peaks of the Rif mountains and has an absolutely stunning Medina where almost everything in the is painted in various shades of blue, from the walls, to doors & floors. The likes of Marrakesh and Fez seems to get the nod ahead of other smaller towns by people visiting Morocco. However I am more of a traveller than a tourist and that means I often venture along the path less travelled or do activities that most people don’t do. I travel to explore and experience different cultures. After spending 5 days in Southern Spain (Seville and Sanlucar de Barrameda) visiting a good friend of mine Fran, I realised how close I was to Morocco so I thought why not? “I am going to Morocco tomorrow” I informed him. Armed with just a few Spanish phrases, I set off around 7 am on a bus from Sanlucar de Berrameda to Jerez. From Jerez, it was a train ride to San Fernando then a short taxi ride to the bus stop where I then caught another bus all the way down to Tarifa. Hours passed and I had finally completed the first leg of the trip; with just “Que autobus de Tarifa” and a  few nods, I had managed to make it to where I needed be…..

Source: x100c.com
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

My last outing with the X100s. Fuji X100s vs Fuji X100T |
Alexander Leaman

Well I’ve been shooting with the Fuji X100T since I could get my hands on one, but I originally decided to keep the X100s. Why? I knew that I probably wouldn’t use it again – my usual setup is an X-T1 with an X100 hanging off my belt, so I didn’t need two of the X100s – as my mum used to plead; “I’ve only got one pair of hands!” Quite. No, the reason that I wanted to hang on to the X100s was, it turns out, a personal issue with attachment to camera gear. I’ve enjoyed using the X100s so much that I didn’t want to let it go. We’ve, um, been through so much together…. A sad tale, I’m sure you’d agree. And I’d be with you on that, but it’s actually a new experience for me to feel something about camera gear. When I dumped the Nikon DSLRs early on it was literally that – I got rid of the fantastic D800s without batting an eyelid. I ploughed the lenses  onto eBay without registering any emotion, and got rid of them with a click of the mouse. Done……

Source: www.alexanderleaman.com
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Trip to Rome | Luke Walker

It’s been almost a year since I’ve had the opportunity to get out and about with my X100s. I’ve shot a handful of photos and I took some when over the Christmas break when I was abroad but not enough. Not enough to feel 100% comfortable using it again. Last week I spent several days in Rome and really wanted to get some decent photos. Although I took a few I’m happy with, I feel most are too cliché and I missed some killer street shots. If you want to get the most out of the camera then you need to use it on a regular basis, otherwise the little git will play hard to get: the menu isn’t overly easy to navigate but more importantly getting the focussing to work in a way that suits your style takes some getting used to. Maybe it’s just me, but either way, I need to keep using it more so that when I do get to use it for extended periods it feels natural. I’m no expert but you can’t expect to bag those unique moments if you’re faffing around with the camera settings 90% of the time…..

Source: www.lukewalkerphotog.com
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Iridient Developer Fujifilm X-Trans Presets | Wim Arys

Brian Griffith from Iridient Developer just released a preset pack that attempts to reproduce the Fujifilm in-camera film styles. These include all highly regarded Standard/Provia, Vivid/Velvia, Soft/Astia, ProNegStd, ProNegHi, Classic Chrome, Monochrome, Monochrome+G, Monochrome+Ye, Monochrome+R and Sepia film emulations. You’ll also find the “neutral” styles which are not intended to mimic any of the in-camera looks but should give a very good colorimetric color match to standard color reference charts such as the ColorCheckerSG and IT8. These presets were produced without any assistance from Fujifilm wand may not give absolutely identical results to the in-camera processing. These presets are intended for use with the 16MP APS-C sensor models and have not been tested with the compact 12MP X-Trans models like the X30 or XQ2. They will not provide a good color match on compact X-Trans models due to the different sensor hardware being used.

Source: www.wimarys.com

Q+A: Fuji X on Assignment | David duChemin

You’d be amazed how many emails and comments I get that begin with the words, “I know you don’t like gear questions, but…” So to be clear, I don’t mind gear questions at all. I just don’t know why people think I’m the best person to answer them. I like gear. Hell, I LOVE some of my gear. But I ask of it some very specific, and limited things, and some of the people asking some of the questions are looking for a tool that can do the things that they themselves should be doing. Or maybe they’re looking for a justification to buy a new toy that maybe, just maybe, has the Un-Suck Filter. They don’t. My Fujis don’t, and neither do my Leicas or Nikons.  What I want my cameras to do is get out of the way as quickly as possible and let me do my job. So with that in mind, a few responses to some very sensible questions (I’ll spare you the non-sensical questions like: Should I get a Fuji? No one can answer that for you. Fuji. Leica. Nikon. Canon. All of them will make incredible photographs as easily as truly bad ones.)……

Source: davidduchemin.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Street Photography with the X series | Gary Perlmutter

This article is a guide to help you choose the best Fuji X series model for street photography. Let’s start at the beginning with a bit of background. I am a professional wedding photographer whose work brings in the money that feeds my family, but it’s my passion for street photography that feeds my soul. (However I do now supplement my income by teaching street photography workshops). I have been practicing street photography since before I even realized that the pictures I were taking had a name! In that time, I have always sought to find the perfect street camera, and subsequently owned and tried every conceivable brand that includes Canon, Nikon through to the infamous Leica.To give you some further detail, these cameras included the Nikon V1 (truly underrated camera, only the small 1” sensor let it down), Leica M6 and M8 (great street cameras if like zone focusing, but for me rangefinder focusing was too slow). Leica X2 (great quality, but its AF speed was too slow and the external EVF should have been built in!). Before that, I used one of the original Canon G series compacts: this was ok but its optical viewfinder was no better than looking through a keyhole and on the latest version they have removed it altogether!

Source: fujilove.com
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Two Steps to Make the X100s the Best Street Camera | James Conley

We previously discussed the benefits of shooting achromatic, and we’ve also discussed how to make the Fuji X100s into a high-ISO achromatic machine. This is a great first step into embracing the world of documentary street photography and getting your mind in synch with moments and gestalt. But we can do even better! {Better still, most of these tips can be used on many of the Fuji X-Series camera bodies. Street photography is about capturing moments, and moments for a photographer are about not only about being able to work fast, but also being unobtrusive. The Leica is still the gold standard for fast and unobtrusive work. After you’ve made your Fuji X100s into a Fuji Monochrom, there are two more steps to take to make the camera as Leica-like as possible. The first one is quick and easy. The last one takes some getting used to, and is optional…….

Source: effeleven.blogspot.fr
 


Fuji X100S

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

My favourite X photographs | Richard Simko

It was October 2012 when I purchased my first Fuji X camera.  I was after a small, inconspicuous yet capable camera and I got myself a Fuji X-E1 with 35mm Fujinon lens. This combo seemed to be the best fit at the time. Prior to Fuji, I have tried small cameras from other manufacturer but I was not completely happy for one reason or another. They were of the first generation of mirrorless cameras. At that time a new, but promising technology. I knew that sooner or later there will be a camera that would fit me. I just had to be patient. And I am not talking about megapixels or any of that nonsense. I am talking about a tool that would allow me to focus on my vision and communicate that through the photographs. That “camera” happened to be from Fuji. To this date I owned 3 of them and I liked them all. To me they felt very natural. Quirki at the times but nothing too serious. I read many comments and complains from other people who didn’t like to use them. That’s perfectly fine. Just use whatever camera you like. I have friends who tried Fuji and didn’t feel comfortable with it. They moved to different system and guess what. They  make beautiful images. One camera will not fit everyone. Pick yours and make it work the way you like. I did……

Source: richardsimko.com
 


Fuji X-T1

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Page 1 to 5712345...102030...Last »