Fuji X100s

Rawtherapee 4.2.1 official | Sebastien Guyader

The new stable version of Rawtherapee has just been released, you can download Windows and OSX 10.7 builds on the official website (http://rawtherapee.com/downloads). As new features are added or bugs are corrected (like bad pixel filter fix for xtrans), I’ll make newer Windows builds that I’ll share on my Google drive (link nelow). Please note that I’m not a developer, nor a member of the Rawtherapee team, I’m just a contributor and builder for Windows system……

New features since 4.1

  • RawTherapee-4.2 includes many speed, precision, stability and memory usage optimizations. As such, users of 32-bit operating systems may now find that they can enjoy more stability while using the most memory intensive tools. Of course users of 64-bit systems benefit from this as well. Refer to the full changelog for more information.
  • Powerful color toning tool.
  • Curve control of luminance noise reduction.
  • Median filter in the noise reduction tool.
  • Film simulation tool using Hald CLUT pattern files.
  • Command-line option to define bit depth of output TIFF/PNG file.
  • Multiple improvements to dead/hot pixel handling, see RawPedia.
  • Filename of currently opened image shown in the titlebar.
  • Clip control for the flat-field correction tool.
  • Demosaic method “Mono” for monochrome cameras, and “None” for no demosaicing.
  • Copy/paste processing profile keyboard shortcuts for right-handed users using Ctrl/Shift-Insert.
  • Update to dcraw 9.22 1.467
  • New or improved support for:
    • Canon EOS 7D
    • Canon EOS 7D Mark II
    • Canon PowerShot G7 X
    • Canon PowerShot SX60 HS
    • Fujifilm cameras using the X-Trans sensor
    • Fujifilm X30……

Source: www.dpreview.com

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Fuji X100S Review | Marius Masalar

It has been a little over ten months since I became the happy owner of a Fuji X100S. This charming rangefinder-style compact mirrorless remains among the most universally lauded cameras of its generation. Since its release, there has been no shortage of first impression reviews, spec analyses, and pixel-peeping comparisons against cameras within and beyond its class. Instead of adding my voice to that choir, this review falls into the category of experiential reviews, which aren’t quite as numerous. To be clear, photography is not my main source of income, nor even a meaningful one. Photography is my hobby, and I would rather keep it that way than try to force money out of it at the expense of enjoyment. A camera is a difficult thing to review, and only now do I finally feel like I’ve spent enough time using this one to be able to offer my perspective. I won’t waste time telling you what the Fuji X100S looks like—you can see that for yourself at first glance. Instead, I want to talk about my X100S in particular………

Source: mariusmasalar.me

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Fuji X-T1: Is it a better street camera than the X100T? | Mike Evans

Currently I’m putting Fuji’s highly acclaimed X-T1 through its paces. It came with the standard 18-55 zoom but I have managed to borrow a remarkable little pancake, the 27mm f/2.8. I reckon it is just about the bee’s knees when it comes to street photography. My first question, though, is how this combination compares with the lionised X100/S/T, the camera that started Fuji on to X series road in 2010. It seems incredible now that we have seen the X cameras spawn like crazy from such a simple beginning. But, more important, Fuji has launched perhaps the most comprehensive array of pro-quality lenses ever seen in such a short period. The X100 range with its 35mm-equivalent fixed focal length and ingenious hybrid viewfinder has rightly won its place high on the list of streettog desirables. This little Leica M3 lookalike is probably the most popular go-to camera for street enthusiasts……

Source: macfilos.com

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WCL-x100 The Wide Wide Street | Jonas Rask

So what has changed? Well for the most part I think that I have changed. I now appreciate it as a tool to create a certain change in my usual routine. It is a way to challenge myself, and my typical type of street photography. I didn’t see it as such 2 years ago. Back then it was more about object separation and bokeh! ;) Shooting street for me is about people. Everyday people living everyday life, doing everyday things. I don’t seek to portray deeper symbolic meaning in my street shots, I don’t seek ultimate truth in reviewing these shots afterwards. I seek to portray humans. For that reason I look at my street photography more like street portraiture. To me the streets are the backdrops. The elements on which the caracters sit, and emerge from. Of course I like the certain interplay some characters have with the environment. It can make the photo, and give it a sense of story. But most of the time I just want focus to be on the character. For this reason the shallow DOF from a fast standard 35/50mm FOV lens has proven time and time again to be just right for me in my pursuit in capturing this imagery. Wider angles cannot deliver this. What they instead deliver is ALOT of sub-/context into the frame……

Source: jonasraskphotography.com

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Fujifilm RAW and Lightroom: How Are Things as 2015 Nears? |
Romanas Naryškin

As good as X-Trans sensors are in terms of performance, most software makers have had some trouble with demosaicing the slightly unusual RAW files in the past. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom has been noticeably trailing behind in this regard even back when version 5 was introduced, as I found out in the review. That’s not brilliant given that X-Trans has been around for, what, almost three years now? To be completely fair, the paint-like rendering isn’t as much of an issue in most cases as one might think, and yet I can’t help but wish Lightroom was able to render X-Trans RAW files at least as well as Fujifilm does with its in-camera conversion. After all, superior technical image quality is the whole point of RAW, and Lightroom should certainly deliver. So the question is – does it? Since the X-E2 has permanently taken residence in my camera bag and is now my second tool, if not quite the first one yet, I am very curious to see how my favorite RAW converter will perform. Careful, now. I am about to get technical…….

Source: photographylife.com

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$2,000 Worth of Photography Tools for $89… Really! | Matt Brandon

$2,000 Worth of Photography Tools for $89… Really! 
 
This is not a joke. This is one of the best deals in photography since.. well since ever. Seriously, this is not one of those events where some site is selling a piece of software that is on sale more than it is full price. $2,000 is the real value of this offer. Not only is it financially a great deal – it is product produced from the industry’s best. When I say the industry’s best I mean names like Darlene Hildebrandt, Zach Arias, Gavin Gough, Alex Aoloskov, Lindsay Adler, Trey Ratcliff, Nicole S. Young and more. Check out the list below of resources offered in the bundle. But there is a catch to this deal. It is limited to 5 days. That’s right, you have 5 days to purchase (check out the timer)! So don’t wait too long. As a reader of this blog, I have never asked you to support me financially. But I am, today. If you purchase this amazing bundle through the link here or in my social media links, you will be supporting the On Field Media Project. When you purchase this deal, as an affiliate, I receive a commission. I will give 100% of that commission to the On Field Media Project. OFMP is the charity that I started last yet. We teach non-profits how to tell their story through photography, video and social media. But you are not just supporting OFMP, $8.95 will be donated to one of four charities of your choice. You can choose from Flashes of Hope, Mercy Ships, Camp Smile-A-Mile or Bethel……….

Source: thedigitaltrekker.com

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New York Moments with the Fuji Monochrom | James Conley

Continuing my exploration of the Fuji Monochrom and the achromatic capabilities of the X100s, I took the Fuji for a stroll around the southern tip of Manhattan. The city that never sleeps always offers up great images. Lately, however, it seems that midtown and points north are becoming more deserted at night, while downtown all the way to the end of Canal Street is quite busy. Soho, Chinatown, and the East Village were all relatively heavy with pedestrian traffic, providing good chances for street photography. Maybe Midtown has finally gotten expensive enough that the only people who are able to afford to live there are trapped in offices. The majority of these images were shot with the X100s. A few, however, were shot on the XE-1, which I’ve set the same as the X100s. The XE-1 allows me the occasional use of wider angle lenses, so it’s always in the bag. Both cameras use the X-Trans CMOS sensor (though the X100s has version II of that sensor) and the images are of identical quality………

Source: effeleven.blogspot.fr

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Jumping Ship – From DSLR to Fuji X | Jason Pitcher

It all started in July 2013 when I bought a Fuji X100s. Apart from being a gorgeous camera, it has amazing image quality and portability. I’ve been babbling on about it on these pages for a while. For what I shoot, when I shoot, it does a fantastic job. I recently printed the final image from this post on fine art paper at 13″ x 19″ and it is gorgeous! So I was reviewing the pictures I’d taken through the last 6 months of the 2013, and I realized that I hardly touched the D800E. It was a rapidly depreciating asset that I almost never used. With the addition of the teleconverters for the X100s, The only thing I needed the Nikon for was long lens work or super wide angle stuff. I also came to realize that 36MP is overkill for my needs. I decided to take to leap and sell the Nikon and most of the glass. Because of my experience with the little Fuji, I wanted to replace it with a small, light CSC that could go super wide and long to cover what I needed the Nikon for, but in a smaller package. I was going to stay with Fuji because I now knew it and was comfortable with the processing workflow, which is a very important consideration. I also want a viewfinder. I will always want a viewfinder. Always. So, given the extensive range of interchangeable compact cameras they do, how do I decide…….

Source: jasonpitcher.com

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X100s v X-Pro1 – Comparing Two Favourites | Dave Young

Having owned my X100s for just a little over a week now and more or less taken it everywhere, I thought it would be an idea to talk about my initial impressions of it against my X-Pro1 which through 12 months of ownership I’ve had a bit of a love/hate relationship with. At times I feel the X-Pro1 is the best camera I’ve ever owned and at times I’ve felt I should sell up and start over with a completely different system. Coming from a pretty simple DSLR system of a Canon 5D Mark1 and a couple of primes to the Fuji X-Pro1 was certainly an eye opener for sure. Having always had that nagging feeling in the back of my mind that the X100 was the camera I really should own, I had the option to pick one up recently. I could have added another lens, or maybe even two to my X-Pro1 but felt now was the time to finally buy into the X100. I picked up a soon to be replaced almost new X100s which is perfect for everyday carrying around and with the 23mm fixed focal length is ideal for just about, well everything…….

Source: daveyoungfotografia.co.uk

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SHARPENING X-TRANS FILES IN ADOBE LIGHTROOM |
Pete Bridgwood

Sharpening is one of the most taxing aspects of the digital process and consequently many photographers prefer to stick to safe and secure ways, either using presets, plug-ins, exporting to Photoshop or ultimately using JPEGs straight from camera. The X-Trans sensor produces wonderful JPEGs, and all the usual advice about always shooting in Raw doesn’t necessarily hold true anymore. There are now many professional photographers who happily shoot JPEG using X-Series cameras all the time and have no complaints. JPEGs are very convenient, but for a landscape photographer like me, interested in the creative process and using post-processing as part of the digital alchemy, Raw files are so much more versatile. Sharpening Raw files from the X-Trans processor can be challenging for those of us who have grown familiar with more traditional Bayer array sensors; they demand a different approach and even experienced photographers will find there is a learning curve……

Source: petebridgwood.com.gridhosted.co.uk

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