Fuji X100s

Review: The Fuji Instax SP-1 Printer | Ian MacDonald

In February I wrote an article about the Fuji Instax SHARE SP-1 Printer called “A photograph needs to be real:  The beauty of the Fuji Instax printer“. In that article I shared my thoughts about “growing up” in the era of digital photography and how, recently, I had come to realize the value of the printed photograph.  I discussed the impact an amazing printed photograph has on me, and also my desire to print more often. While thinking about some upcoming photography projects I was planning, and a photography trip I was about to take,  I realized how valuable the Fuji Instax SHARE SP-1 printer would be.  Thankfully it worked out that I could receive one before I left for my trip. I have to admit that I was like the little kid on Christmas day waiting for the courier to deliver the printer.  I will always be the guy who nerds out on new gear, but this time it had special meaning to me……..

Soucre: Review: The Fuji Instax SP-1 Printer – Ian MacDonald Photography

Mad about Fuji Cameras | Michael Gane

I was taught the basics of photography by my wonderful Uncle who had a successful photography business in the City of London in the 70s; he was very well respected within the photography community and made his name for his Architectural photography, he had this amazing eye for capturing buildings and interiors, he always spoke about converging lines that drew the viewer into the image. He was a true master and taught me to take a moment and step back and really look at the scene in front on the lens. Another important lesson he taught me was, if I see something that catches my photography eye, just before firing the shutter let those emotions register as he believed (as do I) that those feelings and emotions transfer onto the censor! When I visited him in the big city, we would spend long hours photographing the cityscapes but also walk through the busy London streets photographing the people, capturing the lives of strangers on film, bringing those moment’s to life on film, yes film! ……

Source: www.thefxworks.co.uk

3 Chapters and 3 Years of Friendship | V. Opoku

One of the most rewarding things about what I do is the fact that I get to become friends with strangers from all over the world. Isabelle, Florent and I met in person for the first time 3 years ago, just one day before their wedding and we’ve remained friends ever since. During that period, we’ve shared some fun moments together including celebrating a friend’s wedding, Bastille Day under the Eiffel Tower one summer evening and helping Florent put their kitchen together. In fact, their home has become my home whenever I am in Paris. And as fate would have it, I happened to be in Paris at the “right time” on various occasions – one during the latter stages of Isabelle’s pregnancy and the other around Yaelle’s first few months. However, doing a maternity and baby shoot was not something we planned in advance, they just happened, right there on the spot ; “my flight is in a few hours, should we grab some frames before I head out?”…….

Source: vopoku.com

Photo trip to Peru | Alec Fedorov

I am an amateur photographer who has been an avid reader of your website for three years. Thanks for the great service you provide to the community of photographers. Recently, my wife and I returned from an REI trip to Peru where we hiked the Salkantay Trek to Machu Picchu, and I would like to share our experiences with the readers of your site. I brought two cameras on the trip: Fuji X100s and Sony RX100III, both of which are great for travel photography. My go-to camera was the Fuji because of excellent image quality and ease of use. The Sony was kept in my pants pocket and came in handy a few times. We arrived in Cusco, where we spent three days acclimatizing to the altitude, since the Salkantay Pass is at 15,200 feet. Cusco has the population of about 450,000 and it was the historic capital of the Incan Empire until it was conquered by the Spanish in 1532. Nowadays, Cusco is a growing city, and it is a tourist hub for trips to Machu Picchu…..

Source: www.stevehuffphoto.com

Bhutan | John W

Bhutan has been lauded by many as the happiest country in the world.Curious travellers are very much drawn to very notion, despite the high daily tariffs imposed on visitors. Some take a reprieve from the daily stress of everyday life and work; wanting to discover for themselves the secrets to the fountain of bliss. Why are people perceived to be the happiest in this small inconspicuous Himalayan Kingdom where wealth, resources and technologies needed in modern society are clearly not in abundance?Scholars and government officials from various countries visit Bhutan for a very different reason altogether. They are surgical in the analytical dissection of the famed Gross National Happiness (GNH). One of the strangest barometer of national success ever institutionalised in the modern world, GNH de-emphasise material wealth and broadens its indices across four development pillars. In short, they are hunting for the elixir of good governance – the ability to attain, measure and implement happiness at a national level………

Source: inabyss.exposure.co

Curation Break | Thomas Menk

Hey my friends and readers,

for the next 4-5 weeks I’m traveling through New Zealand and Australia for work and holidays. During this time, I will stop curating news and articles about Fuji relevant stories on www.tomen.de and www.scoop.it/fuji-x-pro1. Sorry for that but it would become difficult for me to organized.

I wish you all the best and I promise to deliver in addition all interesting articles after my journey :-)

Best wishes

Thomas

Fuji X100 WCL – Wide Conversion Lens Review | Colin Nicholls

Here is a short review of the Fuji WCL, I don’t bother with charts and all that so it’s just a few photos of the kit, what I think about it and a healthy dose of sample images, all images are shot RAW and edited in Lightroom. I’M WORKING WITH THE ORIGINAL X100. The Fuji WCL will turn your X100’s 35mm field of view into a 28mm [full frame equivalent] whilst keeping it an F2 lens and retaining the fuji quality, it screws on nice and simply, you then tell the camera it’s there and away you go. Its a nice small attachment that adds a good bit on length to the X100’s lens, allowing you (as with the TCL)  to hand hold it with the left hand and have a bit more support. Here is a comparison between the 18mm F2 and this WCL I’ve set them up the same so you can see the difference, they are both shot RAW and edited in Lightroom, apart from a bit of colour difference [not sure whats going on there] they are very similar…….

Source: www.colinnichollsphotography.com

Please visit my new website | Thomas Menk

I created a new website at http://www.thomasmenk.com where I show some of my portfolios :) Thank you for visiting my website and your interest in my photographs and services.

Landscape Photography by Thomas Menk. Travel Photography. Fine Art Prints. Landscape, Architecture and Urban Landscapes.

Source: www.thomasmenk.com

Low Light Photography With The Fuji X Series / X-E2 & X100 | Colin Nicholls

Now it’s no secret that the Fuji X series can hold it’s own in the abilities of modern cameras to shoot in low light, maybe not to the dizzy extremes of some gear but it really can hold it’s own in the dark situations we sometimes face. This blog is a short review on how the X-E2 + X100 handle themselves in very dark conditions and how with the right glass (namely the 23 & 56) you can exploit a dark situation and get the shot. Now that’s not to say you don’t need some light, even with epic ISO levels a room which is flat and boring light wise won’t make a good shot, so here are some shots, the conditions and why I’m glad I could get the shot. The glorious Fuji 56mm and it’s super aperture of F1.2 allow you to gather loads of light, it’s hard to show how dark these scenes actually are on a blog post, but they are darker to the eye than the images look here, so pretty dark……

Source: www.fujixpassion.com

Jodhpur – The Blue City | Rupert Marlow

Unlike Jaipur (The Pink City – that is actually orange), Jaipur truly lives up to its name and is, from above and inside, mainly blue. It is stunning. Established as a colour, the mix of which was initially adopted by the Brahman Caste as an auspicious colour, was used to keep houses cool and repel termites. The entire city is not blue though but only the main part around the Palace Fort as this is where most of the Brahmans were concentrated.We arrived by train from Jaisalmer and headed straight up to the Fort as the town’s main attraction. It is without doubt, the most fascinating one we have done so far and the audio-guide is absolutely fantastic. The Palace Fort stands well above the blue area of town and is truly imposing. It has been used as an impressive backdrop in many films, most recently, in one of Christian Bale’s portrayals of Batman as he climbs from a pit to find himself at the base of the fort……

Source: rupertmarlow.exposure.co

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