Leica M

Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) review | Digital Camera World

A digital camera that shoots only in black and white might seem mad, but Leica has embraced the idea and introduced an updated version of its Monochrom rangefinder. The most obvious upgrade is the move from an 18-million-pixel CCD sensor to a 24-megapixel CMOS unit. Not only does this improve resolution, but the use of CMOS technology means the Monochrom (Typ 246) gets live view display and the ability to shoot 1080p Full HD video. The new 3-inch 921,600-dot LCD monitor is also a great improvement over the previous 2.5-inch 230k-dot screen and is protected by a sheet of super-hard, scratch-resistant sapphire glass. There’s also a faster processor that can push DNG raw files and JPEGs to the memory card a lot quicker than before, as well as being able to display captured images with less delay. As the camera shoots only in black and white, the Monochrom has no need for the coloured filters that usually cover pixels on digital sensors. Without these filters more light reaches the photodiodes, hence the base sensor sensitivity has been upped to ISO 320, with the range extending to ISO 25,000. As with most other modern Leica M cameras, you can choose between manual exposure or aperture priority, but focussing is an entirely manual affair……

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.digitalcameraworld.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Mono a mono: Leica M Monochrom (Typ 246) hands-on |
Damien Demolder

Leica’s new Monochrom M camera brings the black-and-white-only concept up to date and into line with the technological advantages of the latest M (Typ 240) and M-P cameras. The main changes in Leica’s latest M-series models are a switch from the previous CCDs to 24MP CMOS sensors, and thus the introduction of live view, a new buffer to speed the processing along and a much better rear screen. With modern Leicas you have to look pretty closely to know which one is in front of you. The M Monochrom (Typ 246) has been designed very much in the style of the latest M models, with the distinctive curved corners and a very solid build. As expected, the top deck and base plates are machined from solid blocks of brass, while the body is made from magnesium alloy. The top-plate is free of any embellishment, and there isn’t a red dot to be seen anywhere – or even a Leica logo – so the camera is very low-profile and designed not to stand out. The chrome black finish is nicely matte too, and contributes to the overall understated concept. The only written clue to the exact model you’re holding is the word ‚Monochrom‘ etched in black into the black hotshoe guides……..

Source: www.dpreview.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Leica 28mm Summilux f1.4 Aspherical | Jonathan Slack

In 2008 Leica surprised the world by releasing the 21mm and 24mm f1.4 Summilux Aspherical lenses and in 2010 they announced the 35mm Summilux FLE (floating Element). So there has been an expectation for some time that there would be a 28 Summilux to complete the picture. In 2014 they produced a special edition stainless steel lens (101 were produced to celebrate 100 years since Oskar Barnack produced the first prototype of a 35mm camera). The expectation was that a series lens would soon follow, and finally it has. I had a prototype lens to test in April 2013 (when the picture above was taken). Sean Reid also had a prototype in early 2014 and has made a report on his site ReidReviews on May 22nd – you can click on the link to look at his detailed images. I returned the prototype last summer, but was lucky enough to be able to buy a lens a little early, and I’ve been shooting with this early serial lens since March. Some of the images shown here may be familiar  as I’ve been allowed to release them over the last month or so. For many photographers the Leica 28mm f2 Summicron Aspherical is a favorite lens, but personally I’ve always found it slightly uninspiring, whilst the 28m f2.8 elmarit is a fantastic lens – tiny and incredibly sharp, but of course it’s only f2.8. I wasn’t sure whether I actually needed the extra speed, but I’ve found that the quality of the lens wide open is rather seductive…….

Source: www.slack.co.uk
 


Leica M-P 240

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

The Leica 50mm f/2.5 Summarit-M | 35mmc

Along side – or at least attached to – the Leica M-A I recently borrowed from Leica UK was a 50mm f/2.5 Summarit-m. To be honest I’m not sure if they meant to send me this lens, or if they had intended to send me the new 2.4 version, but either way this is what I received. It is also the lens I shot all but a few of the photos I took with the camera over the period of time I had it. And since this amounted to quite a few photos, I actually came away with quite a good appreciation for how well this lens performs… So I thought I’d do a little review… For the most part, the “new” lenses in my box of tricks are Voigtlanders, and even the Voigtlanders I own are a few years old. My newest Leica lens is a late model v4 50mm ‘cron, but even that dates back to 1989 – it’s the same age as my wife. Despite being 26 years old and having a few marks on and around its being, it does feel quite smooth to operate (the lens, not my wife…get your mind out the bin!). In fact it does feel quite close to a brand new Leica lens, but as close as it might be, it definitely isn’t as smooth and silk to use as the Summarit was…….

Source: www.35mmc.com
 


Leica M-P 240

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Why Shoot Film? | Leicaphilia

Why shoot film? In a digital world of instant information and communication, there is something very appealing about a medium that requires one to slow down, focus and delay, (thus enhancing) gratification.  There is nothing like shooting a roll of film, then, whether processing yourself, or waiting to receive your results from a lab, viewing the results of what was so carefully crafted. Professional photographers know and love the image quality of film.  Many professional artists will tell you that there is a quality to film that isn’t easy to, or even impossible to replicate digitally. In a fast paced digital world, there is definitely a need for digital photography within the professional realm, but there will always remain a cherished place, and desire for film as well.  There is a growing embracement of film among creative youths, who are discovering its magic for the first time. With the increasing accessibility of high quality cameras and lenses at affordable prices, it’s easy for anyone to get started with film. This has opened up a thrilling resurgence of creativity and ingenuity within the world of photography…….

Source: leicaphilia.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Leica M Edition 60 – The Street Photography Review . . . |
Street Photography Blog

. . . During the previous installment of this review, I got to know the M Edition 60 a little better and gained a clearer understanding of what it can offer photography today. Now in this, the final chapter, I took the Leica M Edition 60 out and onto the streets of Chester and Manchester, where I could properly put the camera through its paces.  . . The brief was simple. Evaluate whether a digital camera can function as an everyday ‘shooter’, without a screen – just myself and the Leica M60 enjoying a relaxing stroll through the sights, sounds, smells and inhabitants of two popular, sprawling and rugged cities in the North West of England.

Source: www.streetphotographyblog.co.uk
 


Leica M-P 240

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

New Leica M Monochrom (Type 246) at High ISO – Comparison Test | Jono Slack

Well, I don’t do this sort of thing, but I have been asked, so I thought I’d do a simple (hah!) comparison between different Leica cameras at different ISO values in black and white. I’ve included:
 

  • Leica M9
  • Leica M Monochrome
  • Leica M-P (typ 240)
  • Leica Monochrom (typ 246)
  • Leica X (typ 113)

I’ve made a real attempt to keep everything as equal as possible. It seemed to be worth including the X, although it’s an APS-C camera, the 16mp at 23mm is very roughly equivalent to the 24mp at 28 mm full frame. All pictures were taken at f8 (except the Leica X which was at f5.6), and with the Leica 28mm Summilux on the M cameras, and with the 23mm lens on the Leica X. The tripod wasn’t moved between shots, and the camera’s white balance was set to daylight…….

Source: www.l-camera-forum.com
 


Leica M Monochrom

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

The Future of the Leica M (Cometh) | La Vida Leica!

Exclusive La Vida Leica news! So, earlier in the week we dropped a little tidbit about the Leica Q (Type 116) coming in June. What about the Leica M, you ask? Many people have been thinking that there must be a megapixel monster lurking in the wings – to be introduced at Photokina 2016. Well, we have both good news and bad news – and in both cases, people are going to be talking about this for some time to come. Many will even say we’re insane. But regular readers of La Vida Leica know that we’ve had many exclusive scoops in the past… The (new) Leica M Monochrom, M-E, M-A, T and X Vario to name a few. Granted, some details are still a bit vague – nature of the business – but you heard it here first! First, the good news. You won’t need to wait until Photokina 2016… A new M camera is coming by the end of this year! You might be wondering why this isn’t coming out at Photokina 2016. Three guesses here; one is that it might be more of a „special edition“ sort of camera like the Leica M60, especially if it lacks an LCD (more on this below). Second, we understand that Leica has been working on a „high megapixel camera“ but it might not be ready for primetime (again, more on this below). There’s also the fact that the Leica M-P came out in September, and we all know what that means… Finally, our source was clear – this camera was coming by the end of the year……

Source: lavidaleica.com
 


Leica M-P 240

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

How to choose a film Leica M rangefinder | Michael Fraser

I’m often asked, „Which Leica M should I buy?“. My usual response is to run down the features of the various models and compare this to what the photographer is looking for in a camera. At this point, it generally becomes clear which M is right. Once you’ve made the decision to purchase a Leica M, you’re confronted with a bewildering assortment of models released over the past 60 years. In order to streamline the decision making process, I’ve summarized the decision making process into a handy dandy flow chart. This chart includes all of the major Leica M models made since 1954, but excludes the Leica CL and Leitz Minolta CLE. The chart also excludes non-Leica M compatible rangefinders such as the Zeiss Ikon, Konica RF, and the Voigtlander Bessa cameras; these are fine cameras, but for the purpose of this post, I’m assuming you’re looking for a camera made by Leica. Finally, I’ve not included more specialist M cameras, like the M1 and MDa, which lack a viewfinder, rangefinder, or both……..

Source: mfphotography.ca
 


Leica M

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

The Leica M3 DS – Double Stroke vs. Single Stroke | 35MMC

Since writing my first Leica M3 post – and in fact actually not long after I published it – I found myself in the possession of a rather tatty Leica M3 double stroke. At the time of writing this first post I had no direct experience of an early model, yet despite this I managed to be fairly fervent in my conclusions about buying a late model. Because of this I thought it worth an update to reflect this more recent and actual hands on experience of the M3 DS. Before I get stuck into this post, let me just point out that this is effectively a part 2 to the first Leica M3 post. So if you have stumbled across this looking for general info, or if you want broader depth of opinion on these cameras, I’d start here first……

Source: www.35mmc.com
 


Leica M

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

Page 5 to 31« First...34567...102030...Last »