Reviews

Fujifilm X100T | K-pture

Il y a parfois des rendez-vous ratés, des histoires d’amour avortées. Telle est mon histoire avec la série des Fuji X100/S/T. J’ai adoré le Fujifilm X100 originel ; au premier regard, j’étais conquis. Malheureusement, la relation a été de courte durée. L’appareil était très charmant, plein de promesses, mais bourré de défauts. La rupture a été douloureuse, mais rapide. Son successeur, le Fujifilm X100S a eu le même effet sur moi, mais j’étais plus méfiant. Fuji avait écouté les utilisateurs du X100 et amélioré de nombreux points, y compris l’autofocus et la réactivité générale. Mais ce n’était pas encore « ça ». Je l’ai emmené avec moi sur quelques reportages, en second voire troisième boîtier, mais il n’est pas parvenu à me convaincre (pour une utilisation professionnelle.) L’autofocus était bien meilleur, mais il avait encore des défauts et surtout l’ergonomie était loin d’être parfaite ; mention spéciale à la roulette directionnelle imprécise et pratiquement inutilisable. Je me suis plutôt dirigé vers les X-E2 et X-T1. Quoi qu’il en soit, le X100S était et reste un excellent appareil……..
 
Source: blog.k-pture.com

English version (Google Translate)
 


Fuji X100T

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HO! HO! HO! with the XF 50-140mm F2.8 R LM OIS WR |
Olaf Sztaba

When a package from Fujifilm Canada with the XF 50-140 OIS lens arrived on my doorstep, I got unusually excited. I couldn’t wait to start shooting. How strange, I thought. After all, I have never been a fan of zoom lenses; I mostly shoot with primes and the line of XF prime glasses fills my camera bag leaving no space for zooms. But somehow, this new, large, heavy lens had captured my attention since the first day it was announced. There are three main reasons: First, we have said many times on this blog that the right way for any company to build a photographic system from the ground up is to start with quality lenses. Amateur photographers usually get excited about cameras while lenses tickle the professionals (in the end, great glass will attract pros and ultimately sell cameras). In fact, the prime reason we started shooting Fuji X-series exclusively was the superb quality of the XF lenses. The XF 14mm F2.8, XF 35mm F1.4 and XF 56mm F1.2 are in our bag and they are some of the best lenses we have ever used. Therefore, XF 50-140 F2.8 OIS WR – the first really professional zoom from Fuji immediately had us on alert……

Source: olafphotoblog.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Fuji 50-140mm f2.8 :: It Thinks It’s A Prime | Derek Clark

All of these portraits of my kids are straight out of the camera. I have not adjusted contrast or sharpness. This is what you get from an X-T1 and the 50-140mm f2.8. I will do a follow up post to show how great the shallow depth of field looks, but I wanted to get a review out as quick as possible and it’s been a dark grey weekend. This won’t be a technical review. You can find plenty of specs on the web if you need them. Specs are fine, but if they’re not engineered properly, they don’t mean a thing! It seems nobody told this lens that it’s not supposed to be as sharp as a prime. Come to think of it, nobody told Fuji that you can’t make a zoom that performs like a prime lens either. But I’m glad, because they have pulled it off. Click on any of the portrait shots to see a full size version on Flickr. Ok, so the shot above is sharp, very sharp. But look below and you will see that this is just a small crop of the original photo. Not only that, but as I said above, this is SOOC. These portraits of my kids were shot with the Fuji X-T1 and the new 50-140mm f2.8. With a full frame equivalent of 75-210mm, this is Fuji’s answer to the classic professional workhorse 70-200mm f2.8. Now I own a 70-200mm Nikon and it’s a fantastic lens (as is the Canon version). It’s the reason I’ve held on to my Nikon D800, because I need that 200mm reach for my jazz photography. Fuji’s other long zooms are too slow for what I need and my longest prime is the awesome 56mm f1.2. I’m looking forward to my next jazz shoot with an all Fuji setup!………

Source: www.derekclarkphotography.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Fuji XF 56mm f/1.2 R: A stunning, ultra-fast portrait lens
for X-Series | MacFilos

Every so often a lens comes along that tickles the fancy. My particular fancy is normally stirred by one or other of the long list of venerable Leica optics. They are an expensive indulgence, but one that must be savoured at least once in a lifetime. That said, the remarkable XF 56mm from Fujinon has wormed its way into my affections of late. At around £800, this lens with its bright f/1.2 aperture is no Poundland bargain, except perhaps in relation to its nearest Leica competitor, the 50mm Summilux. That object of desire costs nearly four times as much. The Fujinon, on the other hand, is also very good, very desirable and a relative bargain to boot. The lens reviewed here is the original 56mm introduced earlier this year. Fuji has now launched an apodised version, the APD, which will arrive shortly and will be around 25% more expensive than this review model. The APD promises to produce even more satisfactory bokeh but, as you will see, the existing model is already a pretty dab hand at this particular task……

Source: macfilos.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 56mm F1.2

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Fujifilm Macro Extension Tube MCEX-11 | Randall Cipriano

Currently, the only macro capable lens from Fujifilm is the XF60mm F2.4 R. Unfortunately, the magnification factor of the XF60 doesn’t really afford it the title of a real macro lens. For those left wanting for a better and cheaper macro solution than the Zeiss Touit 50mm, Fujifilm just announced the MCEX-16 and MCEX-11 macro extension tubes. The MCEX-16 extends the barrel to 16mm while the MCEX-11 extends it to 11mm. The longer the extension, the larger the magnification. The extenders do have lens contacts for passing on autofocus and aperture data to the body so you won’t lose any functionality with XF and XC lenses. I don’t have any of the X-Mount Zeiss Touit lenses so I can’t say for sure if these will work with them. For these series of images, I tested the MCEX-11 with the XF23, XF27, XF35, XF56 and XF18-55. All processed in Adobe Camera RAW except for the XF18-55 shots which are in JPEG…….

Source: www.randallcipriano.com

FUJIFILM XF 50-140 f2.8 OIS WR FUJINON LENS –
IN THE FIELD REVIEW MYANMAR (BURMA) | Björn Moerman

A few days ago, I got back from a two week photo-adventure to Myanmar (Burma). Even though, I still have a lot of editing work to be done on the +3000 images I shot, I don’t want to delay my in the field review of the Fujinon 50-140 f2.8 lens I took on the trip any longer. First of all I would like to start with a big thank you to Fujifilm Middle East, who provided me with a copy of the lens ahead of the official launch date. As the lens did not have a pre-production SAMPLE stamp on it, I suspect it will be very close if not identical to the final version. The lens firmware used was 1.00. Rather than going into pixel peeping mode, I prefer to give the readers a practical review of how I used the lens over the last few weeks………

Source: bjornmoerman.blogspot.ae
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

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Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 review | Matthew Maddock

I personally shoot with the amazing Fujinon prime lenses for the vast majority of the time, but the XF18-135 WR did strike me as the perfect lens for the travel photographer and so I was interested in how it would perform.  It seems like an ideal lens for use in environments in which you don’t want to be changing lenses, and Fujifilm UK were kind enough to recently send me a sample of the Fujifilm XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 lens to review and generally have a play with!  I am not paid by Fujifilm in any way to write anything about their gear, or influenced at all to say good things! This isn’t going to be one of my huge write-ups as I had a fairly limited time with the lens, and as I said, I’m mainly a prime shooter these days, but I got out and about with it a few times, both in the countryside and in the city.  I’ll post up a gallery of full resolution images at the bottom of the page so you can judge for yourself how the lens performs! The XF 18-135 is the 35mm equivalent of 27-200mm (or thereabouts) which is a good long range for someone if they want to go out with one camera and one lens.  It makes the ideal range for travelling and combined with the X-T1 you have a full weather resistant system.  The advantage of that long range in is that in an environment where you need that resistance, you never have to remove the lens from the body, therefore protecting the internals of the camera……..

Source: photomadd.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 18-135mm F2.8

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Fuji XF60mm f/2.4 R Macro: A Lens Re-visited | Dave Young

With the release of the X-pro1, Fuji released 3 prime lenses for their interchangeable lens system cameras, the 18mm, 35mm and 60mm.

With a 35mm focal equivalent view of 90mm, Fuji’s 60mm lens was the ideal portrait lens, together with having the ability to be useful as a macro lens offering a 2:1 ratio for macro use. It’s ability to shoot sharp is well known with many top Fuji professionals once favouring it as their go to lens, however it’s ability to focus fast in anything other than good light has been questioned and with the release of the razor like 56mm f/1.2, the 60mm is less popular than it once was. Last Christmas, I had an opportunity to try the 60mm for a few days and loved it. OK, so the focussing wasn’t lightning quick, but it was OK and the rendered images made up for it. At the time I’d have bought one there and then given the right incentive. Since then I’ve changed my criteria of shooting and with the XT1, been giving serious consideration to the 56mm. The perfect lens for portraiture work, and super fast with its f/1.2 aperture and its ability to melt away backgrounds. However, a very lightly used 60mm became available at just a third of the cost of a 56mm, and so this seems to work all ways……..

Source: daveyoungfotografia.co.uk
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF 60mm F2.4

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Fujifilm TCL-X100 tele-conversion lens | Phil Hall

For me, the Fujifilm X100S is one of the standout cameras of the past few years. I love the relatively compact size, classic styling, handling and the results it produces thanks to the excellent sensor and 35mm equivalent lens. With the TCL-X100 teleconverter, the focal length is increased to 50mm for times when the lens is a bit too wide. As the TCL-X100 screws directly onto the front of the X100S, there are no electronic connections, while the large front element means the combination is a more bulky affair. However, it still balances nicely in the hand, and while focusing behaves in a similar way when shooting normally, in macro mode it struggled to acquire focus at times. Images look very good, with the X100S applying in-camera corrections to control distortion very well. The good news is that if you’re shooting raw, Adobe Camera Raw 8.4 applies these same corrections, so you’re not restricted to JPEG-only corrected files……..

Source: www.amateurphotographer.co.uk
 


Fuji TCL-X100

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Fujifilm XF 56mm f/1.2 APD, XF 50-140mm f/2.8 and
Zeiss Touit 50mm f/2.8 – A portrait gallery | MirrorLessons

A couple of weeks ago, Heather and I spent the day at a special Touch & Try event organised by the great people at the Riflessi Shop in Turin. There we had the chance to have a second look at the new Fujinon lenses announced at Photokina, which we briefly tried at the event. Due to limited time and the restricted location, this article isn’t an actual review of the lenses but a gallery of images taken in a studio environment combined with a few personal thoughts. While testing these different lenses, I came to the realisation of just how perfectly executed the Fujifilm lens road map is. The company has worked extremely hard to create as many tools as possible, not only for amateurs and enthusiasts but also professional photographers. One of the best ways to do this is to concentrate not only on the cameras but also the lenses. If we count 2015, in three years Fujifilm will have manufactured all the lenses users need for 99% of situations and just as with the X series cameras, the quality of these lenses is extremely high. From the first well chosen trio of focal lengths (a wide angle, standard and macro/portrait lens) to the latest addition, Fuji engineers have never seemed to veer away from the path. Thanks to the latest releases, the options for portrait photographers are now expanding, and with the lenses coming out next year, they will soon have everything they need to work…….

Source: www.bestmirrorlesscamerareviews.com
 


Fujifilm Fujinon XF50-140mm F2.8

Do you love my work and want to support me? If you’re planning on buying camera gear, you can check out above-noted links. Prices remain the same for you, but a small percentage of your purchase value is valued back to me. Thank you!


 

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