Reviews

The Leica 75mm Summarit f/2.5 (short review) | Peter Prosophos

Conclusion

The Leica 75mm Summarit (f/2.5) is capable of rendering with impressive sharpness and very pleasing bokeh.  It’s perhaps too sharp for some types of portraiture and its bokeh may be marginally less smooth as compared to some of Leica’s finest   A major shortcoming is its minimum focus limit of 0.9 m.  The only other limitation is its maximum f/2.5 aperture, which is only a problem if you require wider apertures — in which case, you shouldn’t be looking at an f/2.5 lens.  In the final analysis, however, the 75mm Summarit is an excellent optic in a small package that, in most applications, simply excels……

Source: photographsbypeter.com

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X-StreeT1: My Fujifilm X-T1 Review | Jonas Rask

This will be somewhat different from my usual “reviews”. Well, they aren’t really reviews per se. Much more like me praising the hell out of glorious lenses and cameras. (I’m overly positive, I know!) So, on May 27th, I caved, and bought the X-T1. I had shown some latency, since I really disliked the way the camera looked as compared to my X-Pro1. Looks???? you ask. “Why on earth is that important, Jonas?” Well for starters, it probably doesn’t matter to a lot of people, but to me it does. How a camera feels to me, makes me relate to it, and actually makes my pictures look better! Dunno why. It just does. I like aestetics. I like design. I like order. I like simple. I like my X-Pro1… ALOT! Why did the X-T1 need more dials? Why did it need a EVF hump? Why did it need that big FUJIFILM logo screaming on the front? Why did it need a tilt screen? ….

Source: jonasraskphotography.com

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Fujinon XC 50-230mm f/4.5-6.7 OIS – Review | PhotoZone

Verdict

The Fujinon XC 50-230mm f/4.5-6-7 OIS is a good performer in relation to its price level. The results are mostly sharp in the image center. The corners aren’t quite as snappy in the upper range but let’s be fair – you don’t tend to place the main subject of your scene into the extreme corners anyway. The level of CAs is pretty good at the extreme ends with a weak spot (135mm) in between. Distortions and vignetting are taken care of by the automatic image correction. However, the original characteristics are quite a bit worse though – especially in terms of light falloff. As far as build quality is concerned, you shouldn’t expect wonders. The lens body is completely made of plastics and the build tolerances aren’t quite as tight as on the Fujinon XF lenses. The comparatively low price tag takes its toll here. That being said – the zoom action is a bit smoother than on the XF 50-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS. The AF performs is pretty fast in bright conditions but slows down in low light – this is more an issue on the camera side though. The OIS (optical image stabilizer) works nicely but due the slow max. aperture of the lens this feature is also often needed. Compared to the XF 50-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS, we would place our bets on the XF. However, if your bank account manager starts crying, the XC 50-230mm f/4.5-6-7 OIS will be a viable choice without sacrificing too much quality…..

Source: www.photozone.de

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Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS – Review | PhotoZone

Verdict

The Fujinon XF 55-200mm f/3.5-4.8 R LM OIS is a very harmonious offering. It may not excel in quality but it has only few weaknesses. The Fujinon is pretty sharp across the zoom range and entire image field – even at max. aperture. The low amount of lateral CAs also contribute to the subjective quality perception. Due to the system’s image auto-correction, neither distortion nor vignetting are relevant to the average user. Under the (RAW-)hood these two characteristics are not as quite as perfect though. The quality of the bokeh is just average for a lens in this class. The build quality is on a very high level thanks to high quality materials and tight assembly. However, Fujifilm has overdone it with the stiffness of the zoom ring which feels inconvenient even though this may avoid zoom creeping. In terms of AF speed, the results are solid for a mirrorless system albeit not outstanding when compared to the benchmark systems. The optical image stabilizer is certainly a plus regarding the moderate max. aperture of the lens. Given the comparatively moderate pricing, the Fujinon is a obvious choice even though there isn’t much to choose from in this lens class anyway. Well done, Fuji! …..

Source: www.photozone.de

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Fuji XC 50-230mm lens | PHOTO-Grafia

Ok so lets get this out of the way first, its plastic all around. Lens mount, body, focusing ring are all plastic. The zoom ring does have a nice feeling rubberized coating on it which makes it comfortable to use and its just big enough for your fingers to fit around. The plastic that Fuji used on this lens is pretty high quality though, it doesn’t scream budget and I think it looks quite good. Below are the pictures of the lens attached to my Fuji X-Pro1 at both 50 and 230mm ends. One of the biggest advantages of this lens over its big brother (50-200mm) is the weight savings. It is dramatic how much less this lens weights as compared to the all metal construction of the afore mentioned offering from Fuji. For me this was a big selling point as most of my photography is done on trips, hikes and generally hauling a backpack along………

Source: paulsamolukphotography.com

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Review | Fuji’s XF 23mm f/1.4. With A 35mm Full Frame FOV,
Is It A Rival For The X100S? | SLR Lounge

One of the things you’ve got to love about Fuji is the company’s ambition, and the gamble it’s been taking on the X-Series. Not only have they been putting out a veritable full bar of lenses compared to say, Sony’s appertif for its A7, but the quality of said lenses is so high. Management could’ve taken guidance solely from the perspective of a P&L sheet and decided they wanted to provide many options on the cheap, by creating cheap lenses, but instead have gone for the throat of quality. You can almost tell just by looking at them, but once you pick them up, you know. The XF 23mm f/1.4 fits this mold, and is already a staple in their growing list of gorgeous primes……

Source: www.slrlounge.com

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Fujifilm XF 18-135mm f3.5-5.6 Fujinon lens test (PART 2) |
Björn Moerman

In Part 2 of the Fujifilm XF 18-135mm lens review, we will have a look at some real-life images shot over the last few weeks… If you missed PART 1, please click here. The camera used was a Fujifilm X-T1; a perfect companion for this new weather resistant lens! For most of the shooting I had the new MHG-XT grip on the camera, giving it a perfect balance……

Source: bjornmoerman.blogspot.de

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Review: Handgriff MHG-XE für Fujifilm X-E2/X-E1 | Feyzi Demirel

Im Großen und Ganzen ist die Fujifilm X-E2 eine sehr gut gelungene Kamera. Einer der wenigen Punkte, die mich aber latent störten, war die Tatsache, dass man die Kamera nicht gut greifen kann. Sie sieht zwar sehr gut aus mit ihrem Retrodesign, aber genau dieses Design hat auch dazu geführt, dass der Griff der Kamera kaum als solcher bezeichnet werden kann. Und wenn man sehr lange fotografiert, dann ist es nur eine Frage der Zeit, dass man einen Krampf in der Hand bekommt und die Kamera in der Tonne landet. Soweit ist es natürlich nie gekommen, denn die Liebe zu meiner X-E2 war am Ende doch immer größer. Nichtsdestotrotz habe ich öfter ein wenig neidisch in Richtung der X-T1 geblickt, immerhin hat diese ein Spiegelreflex-Design und somit auch einen vernünftigen Griff. Dieses Problem habe ich wohl nicht exklusiv, weshalb Fujifilm schon für die X-E1 einen Handgriff herausgebracht hat, den es inzwischen als erneuertes Modell nun für X-E1 und X-E2 gibt. Ich wusste zwar nicht, ob dies die Lösung meines Problems ist, aber ich habe mir den Fujifilm MHG-XE Handgriff einfach mal auf gut Glück bestellt…..

Source: www.oz50.de

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Fujifilm X-T1 Mirrorless Camera Review: Fast Shooter |
Tom’s Guide

Not everyone is keen on retro digital cameras, but those who are — be they enthusiasts or pros — can tap some analogue nostalgia with the Fujifilm X-T1. The latest addition to Fujifilm’s popular X-series mirrorless cameras, the midrange, 16-megapixel X-T1, is available body only for $1300 (list price) or with an 18-55mm kit lens for $1700. Its old-school design is attractive and, like the $2,750 Nikon Df, is outfitted with mechanical dials for adjusting exposure and other parameters. Those who prefer the beach or the boat to dry land, will appreciate the camera’s weatherproof sealing. And, the X-T1′s great autofocus and continuous shooting are fast enough to keep up with skittish wildlife, high-energy dancers, and sports such as mountain biking or skiing…..

Source: www.tomsguide.com

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Leica M (Typ 240) rolling review | Ron Scheffler

There are a lot of online Leica M (Typ 240) camera reviews, considering it was announced at Photokina 2012, and started shipping at the end of February 2013. Therefore I’m a bit late to the game, but hopefully my impressions can provide value to those still undecided about the new M. I should also note that my intention is not to touch on every feature of the camera, rather, to discuss how I’m using it and how that does, or does not, suit my needs. Having been a Leica M9 user since the end of 2010, I finally made the decision to upgrade to the M (hence referred to as M240). I’ve debated the merits of this upgrade for some time, as the feature set over the M9 is not considerably different. A consequence of major Leica announcements is that product is often backordered for a long time. With the M240 it has taken about a year for dealers to finally have stock on shelves. Not wanting to commit to a pre-order, it gave me time to keep an eye on early developments with the camera and determine if it indeed lived up to its on-paper specifications…….

Source: www.ronscheffler.com

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